Posts By Brad Moore

New KelbyOne Course – Retouching in Lightroom: It’s All in the Details

Portrait photographer, Tracy Sweeney, will share with you her “It’s all in the details” approach to crafting captivating, creative portraits in Lightroom Classic. In this session you’ll focus on texture and clarity sliders in Lightroom Classic, and learn how to elevate your portraits with simple techniques that will enhance details and diminish distractions, resulting in wow factor photos.

In Case You Missed It: Pro Tips for Photographing Toddlers with Tracy Sweeney

Don’t be afraid of toddlers! Join Tracy Sweeney as she shares her best practices for photographing these little movers like a pro. In this class Tracy teaches you the importance of setting expectations with the parents and shares her tips for coaching the families through a session. You’ll learn her approach to posing toddlers and creating natural opportunities for keeping them engaged.

You’ll get to see Tracy putting it into practice through three different live shoots with toddlers and their parents, and at the end of the class Tracy shares her post processing workflow to help you become more efficient at creating your final images. With all of these tips and techniques in your bag of tricks you’ll be ready to create dynamic portraits that your clients will cherish.

Editor’s Note: In honor of Tracy’s new KelbyOne course, Retouching In Lightroom: It’s All In The Details, we’re sharing her guest post from September 2020!

FIVE TIPS TO CAPTURE AUTHENTIC MOMENTS IN CHILD PHOTOGRAPHY

Well Hello! Tracy Sweeney here, owner/photographer of Elan Studio in Bristol, Rhode Island. I’m thrilled to return and guest blog about an absolutely important topic in family photography.

Have you ever viewed an image that was so powerfully driven in “something” that it physically stirred you? Perhaps it was “something” so evocative, a single moment crafted from someone else’s time, and yet the picture’s energy mirrored an indelible memory of your own, bringing forth genuine connection? Or possibly there was a level of emotion that resonated so profoundly that it made you just feel “something?” That “something,” that thing that pulls us, draws us in and makes us wonder, anticipate, relive, laugh, cry, gasp, pause, that “something” is authenticity. 

Authentic imagery is powerful, and because I know that, I approach every photo session with the goal of crafting beautiful images through authentic means. Authentic, in elementary form, is defined as real and genuine. And through this consideration, it might seem paradoxical that my entire aim is authenticity, because, after all, I am a child and family photographer who poses, orchestrates, and directs; I am not a lifestyle photographer. Do I capture candids? Absolutely, but my style is certainly not photojournalistic. So then, how does one, under these self-imposed parameters (that have shaped my business), create natural, authentic imagery?

1. BE YOUR AUTHENTIC SELF

The key to creating natural, authentic images is quite simple: be authentic yourself. That seems rudimentary, right? Perhaps there was a specific tool you were hoping I suggest, or an actual phrase, game, gear, or direction I would give to guarantee that, even in a melange of subjects, you would be able to draw each out naturally, and each of their best selves would shine.

Well, in part, that’s true, because your authenticity, your approach that makes you feel so natural and fluid, will attract that likeness, and in other trending words, “your vibe will attract your tribe.” If you are interacting with your clients in a way that feels fluid and true to you, your subjects will respond effortlessly and relaxed, allowing you to capture them naturally. This applies to adults and children.

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Ask Me Anything!!! with Scott Kelby and Erik Kuna | The Grid Ep. 529

Want to ask Scott and Erik a question?? Well, it’s too late this time, but maybe someone else asked the question you wanted to ask! Tune in to find out what the guys discussed, and keep an eye out for your chance to ask them a question in the future!

New KelbyOne Course – Portrait Photography: One Prop, Unlimited Possibilities with Frank Doorhof

Maximize how you use a single prop in your portrait photo shoots! Join Frank Doorhof as he demonstrates how he uses several different props to create a wide range of looks and effects. From room dividers to lightbulbs to the common chair and fabric, you’ll be amazed at the possibilities that can be achieved from a creative approach with the props you may already have on hand.

Frank-15-Mei-2011-28

Editor’s Note: This was originally published in 2016, and I thought it would be great to share again along with Frank’s latest KelbyOne course!

A while ago I posted the following online: When you look at carpenters, you will not see them laughing at each other because of the brand of hammer they use. They know it’s all about the work they create, the end result.

Still in almost every workshop I teach, I will have attendees who think they can’t do something because of the camera (or even the brand) they use. In essence it’s all about the work you do, it’s just a tool.

Much to my surprise, some carpenters responded and told me that this was not true and that there are indeed (just like with photography) people that talk down to carpenters using a certain kind of hammer. To say my dream was destroyed goes a bit far but… Well I was actually a bit surprised.

Of course there are fields where gear is incredibly important like biking, racing, etc. that are highly depending on the gear. Fine tuning the car a bit more can be the difference between placing pole position and all the way at the back. The driver is also vital, but sometimes I wonder what the combination is; I think it’s mostly machine “helped” by the human driving it.

Now, with photography I won’t tell you that the gear isn’t important at all. I wish that were the case because that would make our passion a lot lot cheaper! But what I do want to tell you is that the human factor is incredibly important.

Our History

When my wife Annewiek and I were still living in our caves and I came home from the hunt with my dinosaur and could relax while Annewiek was preparing our meat on the BBQ, I couldn’t watch TV so I started drawing on the caves walls. I didn’t draw beautiful women in tiger skins (realize the women back then were also carrying weapons). What I drew were literally stories about my heroic adventures and how I discovered fire and later the wheel. Fast forward to our pyramids and we also used drawing/imaging for story telling.

For me photography is not only story telling, but I do like it if most of my images (if not all) have an element of story telling.

What Is Story Telling?

When you talk about story telling, for a lot of people this means letting the model/sitter do something. Add a REAL element of a story and this is 100% true. I would rather call this a concept shoot, meaning you really tell a story.

Nadine Juli 9 2015 0091

For me story telling is more adding some elements in a shot that make the viewer go, “Mmmm I wonder what he/she is thinking?” or, “What is going on?” It can be done with a simple element like a camera, but it can also be done with something like an expression.

Sometimes people ask me why most of my models look away from the camera. I think this is actually part of that story telling element. If a model looks straight into the camera, this can be incredibly powerful (don’t get me wrong). However it can be even more powerful when the model isn’t. Then the immediate question becomes, “Where is she looking, what’s going on over there?” Hence your story telling element.

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2022 Worldwide Photo Walk Winners with Scott Kelby and Erik Kuna | The Grid Ep. 528

Did you participate in the 2022 Worldwide Photo Walk? Even if you weren’t able to, you’ll still want to check out this episode of The Grid, where Scott Kelby and Erik Kuna share the winning photos and other amazing images from the event! There are always lots of amazing submissions from all over the globe, and this year was no exception.

New KelbyOne Course – Travel Photography: Post Processing Interior Images with Scott Kelby

Wrapping up this two-part series, Scott Kelby uses Lightroom Classic and Photoshop to show you how to bring back the best pictures you’ve ever taken while traveling. Using the photos he created in Travel Photography: Capturing Beautiful Interiors Scott demonstrates his post processing workflow for overcoming tricky lighting, lens and perspective distortions, removing distractions, enhancing sharpness, and a whole lot more. Through each lesson Scott works through the challenges each photo presents while sharing killer tips, tricks, and techniques to bring out the very best in each picture.

On stage at Self Help Festival 2018. Thanks to Adam Elmakias for the photo!

What’s the Best Photo Advice You’ve Been Given?

Hi! I’m Steve Brazill, and I’m a Southern California based music photographer, and the host of the Behind the Shot podcast. I want to start by thanking Scott for having me back. I read this blog regularly, so it is truly an honor. Also, thanks to Brad Moore for all you do.

The last time I was here I talked about “The Joy of Live Music Photography,” and the first time I talked about “Five Lessons Learned from Hosting the Behind The Shot Podcast.” Today, I want to talk about the photo community, and how supportive we are of each other.

Jerry Horton, of Papa Roach, at Fivepoint Amphitheater, Irvine, CA, Aug 23, 2022

If you’re like me, you get a lot of questions about photography. Looking back over the years that I have been doing this I find it interesting that this has happened the entire time I’ve been into photography. Even when I was just starting out, knowing less than I do now, people asked me questions – often ones that were beyond my skillset. If I didn’t know the answer, I would usually try to do a little research to help them find an answer.

Well, fast forward to today and I still get questions, only now I get them more often, and on everything from photography, to licensing, copyright, printing, what to charge, podcasting, and networking (as in actual networks, my background is in I.T.). To be clear, much of this is still way beyond my level, but people ask anyway, and I try to answer, time permitting.

In my case, part of this stems from hosting the Behind the Shot podcast. Each episode I have an amazing photographer as a guest and we dissect one of their images. On occasion I do a special episode, but for almost six years that has been the basic formula, and it creates the impression I know more than I actually do. But every photographer I talk to seems to get a lot of questions too, and every single one of them, in my experience, takes the time, when possible, to help. The creative community just feels unique.

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