Posts By Brad Moore

How to Automate Photoshop with Terry White

Learn how to speed up your Photoshop workflow through automation! Join Terry White as he shares some of his favorite tips and techniques for dealing with those repetitive tasks we all face. No matter how you use Photoshop, there are a number ways you could incorporate automation techniques to work more quickly and efficiently.

In this class you’ll learn how to leverage Creative Cloud Libraries, Generator to save out assets, Actions for all kinds of cases, droplets, PDF presentations, and more. Stop clicking those same buttons over and over again and automate!

In Case You Missed It… Photoshop For Business: Pro Techniques

Think differently about your business! Join Mark Heaps as shares tips and tricks for efficiency in Photoshop, while at the same time teaching you how to set yourself and your collaborators up for success. This class has two parts, and in the first half Mark demonstrates a number of Photoshop techniques to help you work smarter.

In the second half he delves into more strategic concerns designed to help you grow your business, help you define who your customers are, learn key phrases and terms, and so much more. By the end of the class you’ll have a strong foundation for working as a great collaborator whether you are part of a team or an independent freelancer.

What the Flash?

I am not a newcomer to photography or photographic education, but I am new to the KelbyOne family. I’m honored to be among many of my photographic heroes. My goal is that after you read this blog post, you will be motivated to join me on the journey and exploration of lighting.

Light is at the core of our creative practice; without light, it would be impossible to create photographs. Although with the advanced technology of today’s cutting edge cameras, you can make a picture by moonlight, not all light is good light. I photograph people, and I strive to capture them in their best light, both figuratively and literally.

Off-camera flash, in particular, Speedlites, is my tool of choice. The power and possibilities of off-camera flash allow me to overcome many of the challenging “What the Flash” situations I often find myself in. I never want to be a victim of poor available light!

Let us begin with a little background; I started my career as a photojournalist way back in high school while working on the school newspaper. I freelanced for a string of weekly community newspapers selling photographs of our football team, which happened to be in the running for the state championship. Once I learned, I could make a living as a photojournalist. I set my sights on the Chicago Sun-Times.

I reached my goal in 1983, and I’ve been a working photographer ever since.  My cameras have been a passport to the world. I have been fortunate enough to photograph every President since Ronald Reagan. I have been fired by President Trump and captured the pinnacle moments of  Michael Jordan’s basketball career with The Chicago Bulls.  

I left the news industry in 2004. Burned out on bad news, I embarked on the second act of my photographic career starting our wedding, portrait, and event studio. After a large commissioned project for Oprah, The Legends Event, my wife and partner Dawn Davis joined me in this creative endeavor forming Bob and Dawn Davis Photography and Design.

Dawn is not a photographer, but she is the glue that keeps everything together, and I would not enjoy the success I have without her. She has that rare ability of the left brain, right brain. Dawn was an accountant with a passion for graphic design and postproduction.

I think of us like Elton John and Bernie Taupin. They create their music in two rooms, Bernie writes the lyrics and Elton writes the music. I can see the photograph before I press the shutter, in my mind, I see all the elements coming together, composition the moments unfolding, and the light. I am a seeker of light. Dawn sees how the image can reach its full potential with a timeless classic look, and knows Lightroom and Photoshop the same way I know lighting. Together we have created our brand and style. To this day, we pinch ourselves and do the happy dance each time we receive a request to photograph someone’s most special day. We are blessed to work with A-list celebrities, athletes, and people who love photography.

Let us explore the power and possibilities of off-camera flash. The photographs I’m going to share are from the engagement session of Lauren and Ryan.

Time: 5:48:46 PM
Model: Canon EOS-1D X Mark II
Lens (mm): 142
ISO: 200
Aperture: 5.6
Shutter: 1/200

The couple envisioned a romantic scene as the sunset over this lily pond in Chicago. I don’t always have the luxury of shooting during golden-hour, I have to work around my client’s schedule. On this particular day, the skies were gray, and the rain was coming.

One of my core beliefs is always to be prepared. I packed the Think Tank Photo FirstLight 40L backpack with the following:

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The Art of Black and White Photography with Serge Ramelli

Ready for a master class in fine art B&W photography? Join Serge Ramelli as he takes you through his workflow for capturing and preparing photos to be included in fine art photo books. The beginning of the class takes a very detailed look at some of his favorite photos from his book on Paris. From there, Serge moves on to a behind the scenes look at some of his top photos from New York.

As Serge steps through his post processing workflow using Lightroom Classic, Photoshop, and Aurora HDR, he shares the decisions he made at the time of capture, his approach to basic processing, HDR merging, panorama stitching, noise reduction, and of course, black and white conversions. Be sure to download the practice photos to follow along!

In Case You Missed It… Unlocking the Secrets of the Black and White Masters: Classic Techniques for Creating Black and White Images

Learn how to create amazing and dramatic black and white photos in Lightroom! Join Serge Ramelli as he pays homage to the masters of B&W photography by teaching you his tips and tricks for creating compelling B&W photos.

Serge shares his techniques for dodging and burning, working with high key B&W, creative uses for panoramic merging, converting high ISO images, creating and applying presets to save time, and so much more. Serge shares some of his own Lightroom presets to get you started.

Secrets to Amazing Photo Composition from the Masters with Marc Silber

Improve your ability to tell stories with your photographs by learning new compositional tools and secrets from the masters! Join Marc Silber as he demonstrates and explains over 80 different composition techniques that you can mix and combine in your own photography.

Marc uses a series of live shooting examples, diagrams, and examinations of photographs to illustrate each tool and technique. You’re sure to come away with a new perspective on composing photographs, and an expanded visual vocabulary for communicating with your images.

In Case You Missed It: The 20 Time Proven Rules of Composition with Rick Sammon

Don’t just take pictures, make pictures! Join Rick Sammon as he dives deep into his 20 time proven rules of composition. It’s up to you to tell your story with creative composition, and in this class Rick provides you with new ways of seeing when you are holding your camera in hand.

Whether you call them rules or recommended guidelines, Rick shares over 250 visual examples to help you understand how to use these tools to make great shots instead of snapshots. In the end you’ll be a better photographer for not only knowing the rules, but knowing when to break them, and have fun while doing it.

If you follow my work, you know I am passionate about bringing my kids’ imagination to life, and since most of us are getting to spend more time with our kids at home, I want to share some of my favorite tricks with you so you can create the most amazing memories with your family too!

My approach when it comes to working with kids is a little different from other photographers I know. When I work with kids, I step down and let the kids take the Creative Director role (with a little guidance of course). So how do I do that? EASY! The magic of storytelling!

It all starts with, “Once upon a time,” a pencil, and paper.

I’m sure by now, you have heard about the elements of storytelling—the setting, characters, plot, theme, symbolism, and emotion.

I use all of these as prompts when I do storytelling sessions with kids. You can ask questions such as: where does this story take place? Was it day or night? What were you doing? Who else is in the story? Etc.

Then make a little sketch about the story. The sketch will serve as a visual prompt when it is time to posing, and it will also serve as a reference if you are making a composite image.

So, Gilmar, why don’t you just take a picture and that’s it? Why complicating things?

Because I want these pictures to be a representation of these kids’ imagination and their sense of wonder, I want to validate their ideas and feel empowered by them. Lastly, I want to cultivate and nurture their creativity. All of that translates to the final images.

Once you have a story and a rough sketch, it is time for the photoshoot! Believe it or not, photoshoots are super fast if you used the techniques I mentioned above. There is no awkwardness because your little subject will know exactly what to do, and if he or she is a bit confused, you can show them the sketch. It always works like a charm!

Another great way to keep kids engaged in a photo shoot is by giving them props. I found this trick works great with adults too! In the images below, my daughter picked lots of sailing props and played around with them as I was taking her pictures.

Let them get into character. My daughter has been worried about getting older, to the point she said she didn’t want to grow up (she is only 5!) so to face her fears I dressed her up as an old lady, and let me tell you, she was the most adorable old lady I’ve ever seen!

You don’t need to have any props or to be Photoshop compositing wizard. Find a cardboard box, give it to a kid, and see all the creative uses and stories a kid will make out of that box. You can turn each one of them into photos you will treasure forever!

You can see more of Gilmar’s work at GilmarPhotography.com, and keep up with her on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and Twitter.

15 Years Of Retouching and My “Over Retouching” Story

When I started photography 15 years ago, what attracted me to it at first was the post-processing process. I remember seeing some super strong HDR photos that I was in complete admiration of, hoping that one day I would be able to pull that off.

So I started photography using Photomatix and doing lots of HDR. I felt like a kid that was given a toy. And like any kid, I played with the latest toys until I got bored with it

A panorama  of the opera with a bit of illustrative look
A picture containing outdoor, building, large, bridge  Description automatically generated
One of my first HDR shot of the Eiffel Tower that became an official post card sold at the Eiffel Tower :-)

I loved doing this kind of photography. But there was just one thing that bothered me. The first reaction I was always got was, “Did you use Photoshop?” All  because I used a post processing software. It sort of meant to me that I was not any more a legit photographer, but more like a graphic designer.

At first this did not bother me. But after years and years of getting this reaction, I started getting a little tired of it.

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Another HDR shot of La defense, the business area of Paris

In 2010 I went to Photoshop World for the first time in Las Vegas and discovered the work of Peter Lik. I was absolutely in admiration of his photography and the size of the gallery in the Mandalay Bay Hotel. I did some research on him and discovered that he had several galleries on his own. Since then, I visited the one in Soho New York and Rodeo Drive in Los Angeles (which is now closed). I spent hour observing the reactions of the public in the gallery.

What surprised me the most is that the public usually reacted with, “Wow! What a beautiful beach, what a great city,” etc… there was no mention of Photoshop.

It was clear to me that there was some serious post processing done on his photos. But it was good processing. Processing that made the photos very dramatic but with a natural flair.


I then realized that there were several issues in my photos.

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