Posts By Brad Moore

Just One More Flash with Scott Kelby
Learn how to add one more flash to your portrait lighting with Scott Kelby! Building on the foundation you gained in Just One Flash, Scott teaches you the why, when, and how of adding a second flash to your Speedlight setup. Whether you want to create separation between your subject and the background, add a fill light to your subject, or change the look of the background itself, you’ll be amazed at all the great things you can do with a second flash. Be sure to re-watch the Just One Flash class first, then you’ll be ready to take it to the next level with the skills you’ll learn here.

In Case You Missed It
Capturing great portraits is all about understanding how to manipulate the quality, quantity, and direction of light. In Simple Lighting Techniques for Photographers with Tony Corbell, learn how the pros use a variety of light shaping tools to create fantastic portraits every time, and in any kind of situation.

Small Studio, Big Potential
Around 10 years ago I invested in a wooden cabin at the end of my garden. Finally I got every portrait photographers dream, my own permanent studio and it was HUGE… then I started adding lights, props, an office and I realised it was small, very small!

Thanks to YouTube, I’ve invited millions of photographers into my studio and have been asked countless questions about my small home studio set up, so here are some answers.

How Small Is Small?
Don’t let the photos fool you, my studio is just 13 feet wide by 24 feet long. That sounds like plenty of space until you realise 6 feet of length is my office and shelving takes up 3 feet of width in places.

The ceiling is 8 feet high at the centre but drops to 6.5 feet at the edges. On paper, floor space might sound like the big limiting factor but I’ve found the lack of height is an even greater restriction on the lighting styles I can use.

What Are The Limitations?
There are obvious ones, like full length portraits are very tricky with anything other then a wide lens and there’s never enough space to store stuff. But there’s also the unexpected compromises, such as the need to use smaller softboxes; my go-to size is between 50 – 100cm (20 – 40in) diameter. I also shoot a surprisingly large number of images with people sitting down just so I can get my lights up high. I’ve become very adept cloning out stray light stand legs. Shift clicking with the Spot Healing Brush Tool is my secret weapon there.

Does The Limited Space Limit Your Style?
I may only have one wall to shoot against, but that doesn’t mean I only have the choice of one background. I’ve found working in the same space has made me very good at being creative, especially with backgrounds. When I change my background I’m in a whole new studio and ideas flow from there. Fabric, paper, smoke and coloured gels; I’ve used all sorts of things to create new backgrounds in my small home studio.

Where Did You Get That Textured Background From?
After years of working with a smooth white vinyl background, I needed to do something very different to save my sanity. Building a permanent grungy, textured background was the best thing I ever did in my studio. You can read the write up on the build on my blog. My D.I.Y. skills are basic at best, can’t even saw in a straight line. So if I can build this, almost anyone can!

Does A Small Studio Mean Small Lights Are Best?
It’s not the size of the space that dictates the power of the light, it’s the size of the modifier and how close it is to your subject. But in theory yes, I could shoot almost everything I do with speedlights. But having a slightly more powerful light means I can run it at a lower power for quick recycle times and super fast flash durations. Whatever flash you choose, get one that’s battery powered. With less room to run cables and often a forest of light stands filling the space, small studios can be a big trip hazard!

What’s The One Thing You’d Change About Your Studio Space?
My photography studio has evolved over time, but one thing has remained a constant pain: the heating and ventilation (or rather the lack of).

Do you like to use smoke in your shots? Me too. A lack of ventilation makes clearing the smoke a slow process, and as a result it’s ALWAYS held back for the last shots of the day.

In the winter my studio is freezing. Insulation in the walls would help, but that would make my small studio even smaller. Ever wondered why my models often wear coats and jumpers? Now you know!

You can see more of Gavin’s work at GavTrain.com, and follow him on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Designing Graphics for Social Media in Photoshop: 101 with Dave Clayton
Learn how to use Photoshop to help get your message out on social media! Join Dave Clayton to get a designer’s perspective on using your images to build your brand awareness on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram. Each social media outlet has its own set of parameters you need to consider, and with Dave’s Photoshop templates and techniques you’ll be well on your way to creating a cohesive message tailored to each platform. Whether you have a business or a hobby you’ll benefit from learning how to optimize the way your images appear, create more brand awareness, and get more enjoyment out of the process.

In Case You Missed It
Learn how to get started as a concert photographer with Adam Elmakias! Adam is a music photographer based in San Diego who got started in the business at a young age and has learned the ropes from spending time in the trenches with bands on the road, and in all kinds of venues. In this class Adam will teach you all the tools you need to be a successful artist today, from how to get a photo pass to the importance of networking, and from how to build your brand to how to find balance with social media. The photo industry is constantly changing, and one of the most important things you can do is position yourself to be an influencer within your photographic community. Adam addresses all of these points and so much more!

Photo by Eric Ryan Anderson

What’s Brad Been Up To?

Hey everyone, I figured I would take this opportunity to just check in and let you know what I’ve been up to so far this year! I’ve been doing a bit of a hodgepodge of things, but I’m definitely staying busy…

I kicked the year off with a few thousand of my friends (and Styx and Keith Urban) at Jack Daniel’s Music City Midnight at Bicentennial Mall Park in Nashville.

Photo by Robby Klein

As if that wasn’t enough fun, just a few days later I made my debut at The Ryman when I helped my buddy Robby Klein out on a shoot there.

Then there was a Run The Jewels concert a few weeks later.

At some point in January, I decided to start taking this whole photography thing more seriously.

And figured, if I’m going to take this seriously, then then what better way than by helping my buddy Rob Foldy out on a shoot at Vanderbilt University for ESPN?

Photo by Matt Divine

In February, I took a trip to Vegas for WPPI where I led an available light portraiture photo walk. Rob returned the favor by helping me out here ;-)

When I got back, I took some pictures of my favorite pup nugget, Opal Pancake, to give my sweetheart for Valentine’s Day.

(She may have also had a birthday recently…)

I’ve also been shooting some video content for my buddy Phil Barnes, a musician and songwriter in Nashville.

Photo by Eric Ryan Anderson for The New York Times

In March, I helped Robby Klein on another shoot with Kellie Pickler for her Selma Drye home goods collection, then followed that up with helping my buddy Eric Ryan Anderson on a shoot with Paramore for The New York Times.

In April, I shot a couple of videos for a new music startup called Crowd Music.

And one for my friend Annette McNamara to help her promote her corporate headshots.

Then I met up with the old gang in Orlando for Photoshop World.

And from Florida, I went to Atlanta and spent a few days editing photos for The Orange Conference.

Last week I shot Tycho when they came through Nashville and played at Marathon Music Works.

And just a few days ago, I photographed the Iroquois Steeplechase horse race at Percy Warner Park in Nashville.

Coming up next month, four days of shooting at the Bonnaroo Music Festival for Red Bull! This will be my first time photographing the iconic music festival in Manchester, TN, so I’m pretty stoked for that experience!

It’s been an exciting 2017 so far, and I can’t wait to see what the rest of the year holds for me!

Brad Moore is a Nashville based entertainment and commercial photographer and videographer. You can see more of his work at BMOOREVISUALS.com, and follow him on Instagram, Vimeo, and Twitter.

Everything Else In Lightroom: Part Two with Scott Kelby
Building on Everything Else in Lightroom, Part 1, Scott Kelby has assembled a new set of skills every Lightroom user should know into Everything Else in Lightroom, Part 2. This series is designed to teach you a wide range of Lightroom topics, and serve as a reference for those times when you just want to dive into a specific topic, or come back and review. In this class you can master custom file name templates, learn how to use the Map module, become more efficient with export actions, customize your default settings for raw photos, develop a smart object workflow, and a host of other killer Lightroom techniques. You’ll be amazed at how many things Lightroom can do!

In Case You Missed It
Time for some Lightroom killer tips! Join Scott Kelby as he digs deep and shares dozens of tips, tricks, and workarounds to help you work faster, more efficiently, and have more fun while using Lightroom. From little known features to time-saving techniques, Scott will help you get more out of Lightroom than you knew was possible. Feel free to jump in with any lesson that catches your eye, or take it from the top. These killer tips can be found almost every corner of Lightroom and can be applied to any workflow.

Photo by John Schell

My 5 Essentials For An Outdoor Location Shoot
Spring is officially underway and with it, a flurry of photoshoots among the beautiful flowering nature. It’s that time of year when shooting outside is comfortable, and the evening light has the last of winter’s lingering softness. A vast majority of my shoots take place on location, and over the years I’ve learned to bring along a few things that make shooting outdoors that little bit less stressful.

1) Scissors
I have a pair of strong scissors I bring to “tidy” up a scene (i.e. get rid of leaves, small branches, brambles, etc). They also come in very useful if labels are left on clothes, and any of the multitude of reasons you’d need scissors for!

2) Rose Clippers
On the subject of “tidying” up a location, some foliage is a little too thick and this is when my rose clippers would come out. They’ve saved me lots of Photoshop time across many a shoot.

3) Fabric (thick or thin)
Sometimes it’s not so easy to predict whether an outdoor location would be muddy or not. I always bring fabric along to protect the garments from getting dirty. If the dress the model is wearing is full length I would make sure to always have fabric tucked underneath so as to protect it from dirt. Ideally using a fabric that’s a similar colour to the dress makes life easier.

4) Reflector
If you’re a natural light shooter then bringing a reflector along is always a good idea. It’s a great tool to manipulate light as well as doubling up as a scrim, providing some shade where there isn’t any available. It’s also super versatile as it comes in handy on occasions where I forget to bring fabric and needed to protect the garments.

5) Safety Pins and Hair Grips
Two things that are a staple in my camera bag! If you’re working with an experienced hair or makeup artist they would bring these along with them. I, however, can always count on something going wrong on location shoots such as, zips breaking, hairstyle needing tweaking, pinning the dress so it fits better, etc!

We all know that the more you can capture in camera the better, and that’s why it’s worth going the extra step in preparation.

Here are a few more suggestions for a comfortable location shoot!

Water: Hydration is always a good idea!

Hand warmers, hot water bottles and heaters: Great if you’re shooting in the winter.

Umbrella: Have one for the model if you’re shooting in the summer.

Food and snacks: Because food puts everyone in a good mood!

Music and a bluetooth speaker: To help set the mood and vibe

Ladder: Useful as a prop or to capture a new perspective/angle.

Battery bank: You never know when people’s phones or other things need to be charged. It’s always good to have something in this situation to keep you covered.

Shower Cap: If it were to rain, you can protect your camera with it and it also allows you to still work with it.

I would love to know, what are your location shoot essentials? It’s always interesting to see what other photographers bring along to shoots!

You can see more of Bella’s work at BellaKotak.com, and follow her on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube.

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