I am so, so excited about this new full-day seminar — and here’s what’s it’s based on; if I could spend just one day with a friend, and I only had that one day to give them a giant leap forward in their photography, what would I teach them that would have a real, immediate impact on their photography. What could I show them, that would change their photography from that day forward. That’s exactly what I put in this semimar.

Check out this video and you’ll totally get it.

This video gives you all the details. I hope you’ll give it a look.

Who should attend this new seminar?

It’s not aimed at pros (though there will be some pros there for sure); but it’s for landscape photographers, portrait photographers, travel photographers, flash shooters, natural light portrait folks, wedding photographers, and street shooters, fine art photographers, food photographers, and anyone who is just tired of struggling along, and knows there’s got to be an easier, faster, better way to make great images.

It kicks off next month in Indianapolis and Minneapolis

…and I want you to come out and spend the day with me. You have nothing to lose — it’s risk-free because it’s 100% money-back guarantee if it’s not the best photography seminar, you’ve ever attended, at any price ever. Period! Don’t spend the next five years “paying your dues” and learning everything the hard way, or not learning it at all. If you’re ready to make a big jump in your skills and start taking great images now, this is the one day that can change everything.

It’s just $99 for the full day of training and includes a detailed printed workbook (the biggest one I’ve ever written by the way) bonus videos and more goodies. It’s a kick-butt day and you’re going to learn a lot no matter where you are on your photographic journey.

Here’s the ticket info for Indy (Tuesday, May 7, and Minneapolis, (Thursday, May 9). I hope I get to meet you in person next month for a day that’s going to change everything!

Have a great Easter weekend, everybody!

-Scott

P.S. More cities and dates to be announced soon, but we’re going pretty much everywhere in the US, so hopefully we’ll be in your hometown soon. :)


Advanced Photoshop Compositing: The Art of Storytelling with Kirk Marsh

Step right up, step right up, and welcome to the big show! Join Kirk Marsh at the Vernardos Circus for a class on conceptual composite photography. In this class Kirk goes through his process of separately photographing a circus strongman and a juggler with the goal of compositing them both together into a fantastic and magical final image. Kirk goes through the gear used, his camera settings, the location set up, props, wardrobe, and how to approach creating the elements for the final composition.

After the strongman and juggler shoot is completed, Kirk has an additional shoot with just the juggler in a variety of positions to create a fantasy composite of her in multiple locations within the final image. After the images are captured Kirk heads into the studio to share his compositing workflow. By the end of the class, you’re sure to be inspired to create cool composites of your own or maybe even run away and join the circus!



In Case You Missed It

Learn how to do a family portrait with a magical twist! Join Bret Malley as he teaches you all the steps, from shooting to post processing, needed to create your own fantasy fine art composite. Bret takes you through the gear he uses, his process for pre-production, how to communicate and work with the subjects, his lighting setup, how to photograph each element of the composite, and then how to bring it all together in Photoshop. The first half of the class is a live shoot where Bret creates all the pieces, and in the second half he teaches you his tips and techniques for creating a seamless composite that brings your imagination to life.

How I Became a Real Estate Photographer + 8 Tips to Help You Get Started

As I reflect on my 20s, I realize it probably sounds like the same story as a lot of other millennials: broke, confused, directionless, and full of wanderlust. Upon graduating with a degree in Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences from Texas A&M University in 2012, I was having difficulty landing a job and honestly had no idea what to do with myself. So, I did the only thing I could afford to do, which was move home to my parent’s house in Beaumont, Texas.

I spent the next two years aimlessly working in a daycare and then as an administrative assistant in a private school. The wanderlust I mentioned previously became too much to bear, so I quit my job and moved to Rome, Italy for a year to be a live-in nanny. When I returned home again (this time with a belly full of fresh pasta, wine, and gelato), my wanderlust was temporarily cured, but I was still broke, confused, and directionless.

My dad, being a business owner himself, has always attempted to guide me in the direction of self-employment. I had a decent enough background in photography, Lightroom, and Photoshop, so when he suggested that I try my hand at real estate photography, I was up for the challenge. I spent the next couple of months attempting to wrap my head around this style of photography and have been photographing real estate ever since.

Before I get into the nitty gritty, I think it is noteworthy to mention that there are essentially three types of real estate photographers, and it is important to figure out what category you want to fall into. Keep in mind that there are no wrong answers and you can always evolve.

The first type are ‘run and gunners.’ They are in and out of homes in a matter of minutes and handhold their camera. They may or may not have a flash mounted on top and typically take one exposure. (High efficiency and low cost.)

The second type are the most common of the bunch. They use a tripod, take multiple exposures and are most likely using at least a bounce flash. (Average efficiency and average cost.)

The third type are the artists. They definitely use a tripod, make sure each shot is perfectly composed and level, use pops of flash throughout the space with the intention of manually hand blending multiple frames in post processing. (Low efficiency and high cost.)

I fall into the third category simply because I have goals of working exclusively with designers and architects one day and am working towards building a portfolio worthy of doing so. Moving forward, you have to figure out what works best for you and the market in which you are planning to build your business.

Here are 8 tips to get you up and running as a real estate photographer:

(more…)

Last night, I sat down to write this post and I had a bit of a situation. Well, a bit of a disaster actually! I dropped my phone onto my laptop screen and everything went dark. I’ve just taken my laptop to Apple and owing to my carelessness, I now have a five-day wait and a £460 bill to pay for a new retina screen, and it’s caused a delay in publishing this post! My apologies. Let’s get cracking!

So, every #TravelTuesday, here on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider, I land with a little something for you from the world of Photoshop, photography, travel, and life. Today, I’m going to tell you all about something you should be using, and which Scott showed you yesterday—Adobe Spark Page.

Adobe Spark is a creative suite in itself, within the Adobe ecosystem, which allows users to create social graphics, webpages, and videos on a web or mobile platform, and it’s awesome! In fact, all my header graphics here on Scott’s blog and on my own blog at capturewithdave.com are made using Adobe Spark Post.

Scott used Adobe Spark Page to create his story yesterday about his visit on the USS Harry S. Truman, and it delivered an amazing result both in terms of its aesthetic prowess and its storytelling ability. The user interface for creators is top-notch, as is the interface for the end user.

The app allows us to quickly and easily lay out our images, videos, and words, and it encourages good design and placement. The text alignment and animation creates a user experience with apparently seamless links from one section to the next. The ability to decide on the positioning of our images in a variety of styles, and with additional copy over them, gives us the ability to customise our page and truly tell the story in the way we want it to be seen. 

As a photographer, I am of course a creative, but one friend of mine has some strong words which this app brings to life for me. Graphic Designer and KelbyOne instructor Dave Clayton says in his latest awesome class that a graphic designer is a photographer’s best friend. Knowing how to present your work in the best possible way is important for a photographer, and a graphic designer can help you to do this. It seems that this series of apps is the first step towards that goal.

Adobe Spark is part of your Adobe Creative Cloud subscription, and its best comparison is that it’s basically Microsoft Publisher turned up to 11, and it’s fast!

You can take a look at one of my stories on the northern lights here and one of Terry White’s stories on Iceland here

Have a closer look at the Adobe Spark range and I think, as a photographer, you’ll be pleasantly surprised at what it can do for you. 

Much love

Dave

I’ve got the images, stories, behind-the-scenes shots, and even some short videos from my trip out the USS Harry S. Truman last week. Lots of fun stuff to share, and I laid out the images using Adobe Spark Page (about the best way to share your photography work online):

Here’s the link if you’ve got a sec: https://spark.adobe.com/page/D9QsBX3AikF9k/

OK, I’m back to work this week — I’ve got a tour to get ready for (My “Ultimate Photography Crash Course” full-day seminar, kicking off next month in Indianapolis and then Minneapolis. Come on out and spend the day with me.

Have a kick-butt week everybody!

-Scott

Lt. Blaine Reeher Dixon prior to launching off the deck of the Truman in a FA/18 Hornet

It’s been six years since my last opportunity to fly out to a carrier for a few days, and I was so thrilled to get that chance again. I don’t know if you remember the story of my original trip (here’s the link), but I was so overwhelmed the first day out on the flight deck, that I basically blew the shoot. I took the same shot over and over again jets taking off again and again, and when I looked at the images later, I realized I was shooting the wrong thing. Ever since then I’d be hoping for an opportunity to try again, and thanks to my buddy Ed Buice, I finally got the chance.

I didn’t have any internet or cell coverage since Tuesday afternoon, and it was a blessing and a curse (you really learn fast how much you rely on your phone for simple things like “What time is sunset” and “Who was the actor in that movie?” all day long). I liked being unplugged less than I thought, but it was still a nice break (and one I’m glad that’s over).

Anyway, as I write this I’m on my connecting flight home from Atlanta and it’s 9:26 pm, so I’m not going to have any photos to share until Monday, where I’m planning to do an Adobe Spark Page post of the trip. Lots of stories to share, photos, behind-the-scenes stuff. Hoping for Monday. Now, this was a different carrier than I had been on before — my last trip had been out to the USS George H. W. Bush.

One thing was exactly the same, though…

That one thing that was exactly the same was my admiration for the men and women of our US Navy. I wish every American could get the opportunity to spend a few days on a Navy ship. What an outstanding crew – so professional, dedicated, polite, friendly, hard-working, and the sence of pride they have for what they doing, and how they do it, is just something to see for yourself. Seeing how they handle the jets and helos on the flight deck is just…well, it’s a master class on precision and teamwork, but it extends through the entire crew. I’m so grateful for their service and sacrifice, and the sacrifice of their families.

I’m also so thankful to my buddy Ed Buice (you are the man!), and my new buddy Todd “Brian” Beveridge, NCIS Special Agent Afloat Dan Chaney, and all the folks at NCIS who helped make my trip out to a carrier not only possible but an awful lot of fun.

That’s pretty much all I have for today, except that I did take an hour on my first flight today to watch the final episode of Season 7 of “Game of Thrones.” I binge-watched all seven seasons in the past few months while traveling on planes, and I believe it’s just about the best show on TV. Now I’m all caught up and ready for the final season. I hope it ends better than “Lost.” ;-)

Have a great weekend everybody! Anchor’s away!

-Scott

P.S. Don’t forget to book your hotel rooms at the Hyatt Regency in Orlando for the Photoshop World Conference at the end of next month. We’re almost sold out of rooms there. Here’s the link to the travel page.

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