B. Winston Hendrickson   |    1962 – 2018

If you’ve been to the Photoshop World Conference, you probably recognize Adobe VP Winston Hendrickson from the many times he’s delivered Adobe’s opening keynote presentation to kick off the conference.  That’s Winston above during the keynote in 2013, but even if you didn’t recognize him, you’ve felt his input, his influence, and his vision every time you launched Photoshop or Lightroom.

Winston was Adobe’s Vice President of Engineering for Photoshop and Lightroom, and he was the perfect person to be in that role because he used and loved those programs as much as we do. He was a brilliant sports photographer — a far better one than I’ll ever be — and he used Lightroom and Photoshop every day for his photography work. He was a true champion of the end user because he actually was an end user. He “got” us in a way I’ll bet few execs in America today could ever do.

Winston between plays in Tampa for the Falcons/Bucs game.

He would fight for the new features, and improvements and speed boosts — the same ones we all wanted, and his drive, and his team, have made so many of those requests a reality over the years. I loved that when we sat down and talked about things that needed to be added or addressed or fixed in Photoshop or Lightroom, he didn’t defend them; he didn’t excuse them — instead he set out to fix them or to add them, and he had the power and will to do it, and the team that could make it happen. He was the kind of guy you wanted behind such important products, and him being in that role really made a difference.

I was heartbroken to learn this weekend that after waging such a brave battle against an incredibly tough form of cancer, he passed away. He faced that fight with an attitude, strength, courage, and sense of humor throughout that was truly inspiring to everyone around him. His passing caught us all by surprise because his on-going coverage and witty writing style (on his CaringBridge blog) made you feel certain that any day this would be behind him, and he’d be back on the sidelines at a Falcons game, or up on stage at a Photoshop World. My heart sank when I read the news. One of my heroes at Adobe, and one of my dear friends and sidelines buddy was gone. He’s younger than me and gone far, far too soon.

I could tell you so many stories about what an awesome person Winston was. How he stayed up crazy late on the phone giving me advice when I really needed it, or how we’d talk for hours about football gear and settings and lenses (and how I tried to tell him how much he’d regret hand-holding a 200-400mm for an entire NFL game). I could tell you great stories about how he genuinely looked out for Adobe customers, how he even looked out for friends and colleagues, and how much he loved his wife and family, and how proud he was of his daughter’s softball skills and how much he loved traveling with her team.

Anyone who knew him could tell you how humble, funny, laid back, and down to earth, he was. He could make anybody feel comfortable around him, and if you met him for five minutes, you felt like you had known him forever. No pretense. Not an ounce of “bragging” in him. When you were with him, you lost all sense that you were with one of the top minds in our industry. He was just “one of the guys,” and I loved that about him. I could fill pages with stories about him, and our times together, but instead, as a tribute to Winston, I’d like to share a very special story. It’s about what Winston told me was one of the greatest days of his life, and I was blessed to be a small part of it, and watch it all unfold.

L to R: Me, Lynn Bass, Falcon’s Team Photographer Jimmy Cribb, Michael Benford, and Winston

Our story starts in Atlanta
A few years back, at a Photoshop World Conference in Atlanta, some friends of mine from the Atlanta Falcons NFL team were at the conference, and I had told them what a lights-out sport shooter Winston was (thanks to his many years of shooting his daughter’s college softball team. His timing and technique were pro level). Well, I got the opportunity to introduce them at the conference, and my friend Michael Benford (Creative Director of the Falcons, seen next to Winston in the shot above) invited Winston to come shoot a Falcons NFL game on the sidelines.

Well, he was thrilled at the opportunity, and he also made the most of it — shooting like a pro and garnering an open invitation to shoot for the Falcons any time, and sure enough, he wound up covering a number of games for them, in Atlanta and on the road, too.

When we’d be shooting a Falcons game together, in-between plays we’d talk about big picture Photoshop and Lightroom stuff, and I was always bending his ear about feature requests, or things our members would like to see added under the hood, and we’d wind up just talking about everything from cameras to cars, too. We laughed a lot, shot a lot of pictures, but when he shared his Picks after the shoot, I was always amazed at his timing and how many “keepers” he got during the game. He nailed a lot of shots I totally missed. Winston was really talented, and he could have been shooting on assignment for any sports wire service, newspaper, or magazine. He was that good.

I learned something about Winston I never knew
One night over dinner, this Californian revealed something I never knew — he had been a lifelong Dolphins fan. I think saying “fan” is underplaying it a bit. He was a raging Dolphins fanatic! Despite not being from Miami, or even Florida, the Dolphins were the team he grew up following and loving, and he knew every player, every stat, and every piece of trivia from the Dolphins famous 1972 miracle undefeated season. Well, as luck would have it, my buddy Rob Foldy shoots for the Dolphins, and he had invited me to come down sometime and shoot a game with the Dolphins photo crew (Surf, Jon, Brandon, and Jeff). After dinner I called Rob and asked if there was any way that Winston could join me for that sideline shoot. After a few calls, Rob got it approved (Rob already knew Winston from meeting him at a few Bucs games he covered for the Falcons down here in Tampa, so he was already “buds” with Winston, and more than happy to make it all happen).

Game Day in Miami
The night before, Winston treated Rob, the Dolphins photo crew, and me to a wonderful dinner near the stadium and we basically closed the place – staying up late talking football and photography, until they nearly threw us out. Winston was super psyched (to say the least), and the great guys on the Dolphins crew were nearly as excited to see someone so tickled about this opportunity. Just one of those great nights you don’t forget, but this was only the beginning.

We got to the stadium early
Winston couldn’t even make it from the parking lot to the stadium without stopping every 50 yards to get another picture of Hard Rock Stadium. He was all grins, and we kept busting his chops as sports guys are known to do when one of the guys can’t stop smiling from ear to ear. We get inside the stadium, and the Dolphin’s guys and Rob give us a tour of the newly renovated stadium (and it was pretty sweet). We’re getting a tour of one of the VIP clubs (which this early before the game, was practically empty) when up steps Dolphins Hall of Famer, Larry Little to welcome us (and yes, he was wearing his Hall of Fame jacket). Winston recognized him immediately, and the two stood there sharing stories for 20 solid minutes. Larry was so gracious and kind, and funny, and I think if we hadn’t dragged Winston away, we probably would have missed kick off. As we were finally walking away, Winston looks over at me, and says, “I can’t believe I just met Larry Little. I can’t believe it! He was so nice! I can’t believe what just happened!” He was on cloud nine.

It was a perfect day — perfect weather — we’re at the stadium nice and early, and he just met one of his childhood heroes. It can’t get better than this, right? ;-)

Photo by B. Winston Hendrickson

A Field of Dreams
Winston, Rob and I headed up high into the stands to take some shots of the still empty stadium from up high (that’s one of Winston’s shots above). Then we headed down to the field as soon as some of the Dolphin’s players started to take the field for warmups. After a few minutes, the stadium is open; fans are starting to stream in, and they’re cranking the music down on the field. There’s a buzz — an electricity in the air, and there’s Winston, in the middle of “Dolphin-land” and he looks like a kid in a candy store. Huge grin; he’s taking some shots of the Dolphins warming up, and one of the Dolphin’s photo crew comes up; taps Winston on the shoulder and says, “Want to take a photo with the coach?”

We turn around, and behind us, just a few feet away on the sidelines, sitting in a golf cart is the one and only Don Shula – the legendary Dolphin’s Coach — and yes, the coach of that miracle 1972 Dolphin’s team. Winston was speechless (for about two seconds) as they walked him over to meet “The Coach” and Winston and Don chatted for a few minutes about the old team, and today’s game, and then I got this photo of them together. This was truly a magic moment, and I was just thrilled to be there to see it.

Winston meeting “The Coach” — Don Shula.

When they parted, and Winston walked back over to me, he laughed and said, “I just met Don Shula.” Then he stood there with the biggest smile. I don’t think even for a second that Winston thought he might meet Shula in person, but he did, on the sidelines of a Dolphin’s game he was getting to shoot. It doesn’t get better than that! Actually, it does.

While Winston is still reeling from meeting Shula, one of the guys comes up again and says, ‘Hey, want to meet Dan Marino? He’s right here.” Winston turns around, and there is Marino — Dolphin’s Hall of Famer QB and another of Winston’s heroes. That look on Winston’s face says it all.

Dolphins game time
Before you knew it, it was game time. We covered the player intros (through the smoke and fire), and then it was kickoff, and we all went to our different positions on the field and started shooting. Because it was “that kind of day” for Winston, of course, the Dolphins won. Winston once again shot “lights out,” and he shared his Picks from the game over at his SmugMug page. I captured a few for you below so you can get a sense of what a talented shooter he truly was, and why teams were so happy to have him shooting for them on their sidelines.

I knew Winston would want a few pics of him shooting on a day like this, so in between plays I’d grab a shot or two, and I wanted to share them with you here (below).

After the game, as we’re packing up, and he can’t stop grinning from ear to ear, I asked him “So, how was your day.” He just laughed, “It was OK.” As we’re walking out to the car, he thanked me again and again for helping him get this opportunity, and he said, without a doubt, it was absolutely one of the best days of his life. I know a lot of people say something like that, but in this case, I believed him. However, I was just blessed to be there and to have seen it happen, but it was Rob Foldy and the gracious crew of the Dolphins that truly brought Winston such a magical day.

I will always miss Winston. He was just one hell of a guy. A friend and mentor — immensely talented and humble to a fault. You can ask anybody who knew him, inside Adobe or on the sidelines — he was a Hall of Famer in his own right. He was one of the greats.

-Scott

…you’re using TTL (Thru The Lens metering).

I know, I know, all the flash manufacturers love to talk about TTL in their marketing pieces, and it’s touted as a miracle fix-all for new flash users. But in my honest opinion, I think it’s probably the single biggest reason new flash users struggle with their flash or even hate their flash, and it’s because of TTLs total inconsistency or flat-looking results when it does work.

For example, you’re shooting a wedding; you’re getting decent results for the first few minutes; you turn to shoot a different part of the church/reception/whatever, and all of a sudden it looks horrible. You haven’t touched anything, you haven’t changed everything, but it now it looks awful. Now what?

The concept behind TTL is great — it meters the existing light in the scene, and theoretically it then sends just the right amount of light onto your subject. Sometimes it’s fairly right, but quite often it’s not at all, and you wind up with an image that looks like you were shooting a crime scene for law enforcement.

Now, I know what you’re thinking, “But Joe McNally uses TTL!” That’s true — but you’re not Joe McNally. He’s the magical unicorn of flash, and he could form a flash from a watch battery, a packet of soy sauce, and a can of Crisco and use it to light a portrait using TTL that would make Rembrandt reconsider using natural light.

Yes, there are pros who can tweak TTL to where it works for them — but that’s not who I’m talking about here. I’m not talking about people who have mastered TTL or overcome all the quirks of TTL, and they’ve made it work for what they do. I’m talking about everybody else. I’m talking about the thousands of people I taught during my Shoot Like a Pro seminar tour who were miserable with their flash. Sadly, so many had given up on flash altogether when all they had to do was switch off TTL and switch their flash to manual. Then if the flash doesn’t look bright enough in the shot, you just turn up the power of the flash. If it’s too bright, you turn it down.

Can it really be that simple? Absolutely!

I did something to help all those folks
I wrote a book called ‘The Flash Book,’ and in it, I tell folks to turn off TTL and start loving their flash. Of course, there’s way more in the book than just that (or it would be a 1-page book), but it’s a really great start because I teach a system that I know works from the hundreds of folks who’ve told me that now they finally love their flash.

There are more reasons why folks hate their flash, and I’ll cover some more here maybe next week, but this weekend, dust off your flash; turn off TTL, switch to Manual Mode, and start down the path of finally falling in love with your flash. It can change everything.

Here are the winners of my Flash Book give away:
Congrats to:

Teri Yearkey, Macomb Township, MI
Jose Mario Monia Sanchez, Spain
Gary Phillip, England

Still waiting to hear from the other two winners, but we’ll find ’em. :)

Have a great weekend everybody, and here’s to making better images with your flash!

Best,

-Scott

How To Use The Nikon D850 Like A Pro with Moose Peterson
Join Moose Peterson as he teaches you how to use the Nikon D850 like a pro! The D850 is an amazing camera that combines huge files with fast shooting and extremely high quality. In this class Moose teaches you the ins and outs of the D850’s menus and options to help you get the most out of the camera. From a tour of the buttons and dials on the exterior to a deep dive into the menus, you’ll finish this class with an understanding of how to configure the camera to maximize it for the way you shoot. As a bonus, Moose provides a PDF download containing his custom settings.

In Case You Missed It
Join Moose Peterson for an in-depth lesson in how to pack your camera bag for air travel. If you’ve ever had to get from point A to point B with your gear, been worried about what to bring, what gear to check, how to make it all fit, and how to do it safely, then this is the class for you. Moose talks through several different job specific gear load outs, and packs each lesson with hard earned tips learned from traveling thousands of miles each year. It’s not all about the gear though, you’ll learn the importance of planning ahead, how your attitude can make all the difference, and much much more.

Photo by Rémi Thériault

How I Went From Taking Photos Of Nothing To Award-Winning Architecture & Interior Photos
Unlike a lot of photographers with a clear vision of their style and a desire to specifically shoot a certain kind of subject, I’ve been very happy to just get paid to take photos. Seriously, it’s the best job in the world and the happiest I’ve ever been. That said, I also don’t just take anything that’s thrown at me. I’ve worked at my craft and developed my business over the years to work specifically in a commercial and corporate photography field. I mostly deal with other businesses and, I think, I’m good at it.

Project1 Studio

I didn’t go to school for photography. I bought my first SLR just to take random photos of flowers, the ground, and my friends. I was soon asked to start taking photos FOR people, and that was how I started, way back, photography as a vocation. For the first several years it was events, headshots, a bit of editorial and almost anything anyone threw at me. A builder saw some of my landscape work and thought I might be good at interiors. I enjoyed shooting and was happy to take the work that was presented to me. I trimmed my portfolio down to the kind of work I was getting the most of: Commercial and corporate.

Kitchen by Nathan Kyle/Astro Design Centre
Kitchen by Walter William Bunda/Astro Design Centre
Kitchen by Grassroots Design & Build
Kitchen by Marina Medina/Astro Design Centre

Interiors
Focusing my work had the benefit of getting me more of it. Photographers always tell you to show what you want to shoot, but I found it difficult to let go of the “everything” mentality since I needed the cash. Interior work was also an interesting departure from portraits. A more controlled environment let me set my own pace to take images as I wanted them. I learned to move things around a scene, shift furniture and accessories to get the image near-perfect.

That level of perfection has, of course, changed over the years. I added lighting to help fill in shadow areas, or create contrast where there was none. I learned to wait, patiently, for the light to change and be in the right spot to get the best image. To show up before sunrise for east-facing exposures, and stay into dusk for the west.

I see myself as a technical photographer. I like the precision of straight verticals and good colours. I do extensive cloning to remove imperfections in post. I taught myself the pen-tool (thanks to my medium Wacom Intuos 4 for making this possible) to make precise masks for colour and tonal correction. Anything I can correct on location, however, I will. So with that in mind, I’ve invested heavily in my kit.

Kitchen by Dean Large/Astro Design Centre
SAS by Parallel 45
Discovery Dream Homes

Gear
Starting out with a used 1DMKII (1.3 crop) and the Canon 17-40 f/4.0 L with an aluminum Manfrotto 190 tripod, I quickly started acquiring specialty gear to improve on technical issues had on location: Lighting gear, more stable tripods with better ballheads, and tilt-shift lenses. If nothing else, I won’t compromise on quality if I can avoid it, and I have no regrets on any of the more expensive items that I’ve purchased to help me achieve it (and yes, this is a dream kit that I’m extremely fortunate to have).

Here’s an essentials list for me now:

  • Canon 5DMKIV, backup 5DMKIII with Really Right Stuff L-brackets
  • Canon 17mm f/4.0 L TS-E
  • Canon 24mm f/3.5 L TS-E
  • Canon 50mm f/2.8 L TS-E Macro
  • Canon Extender EF 1.4x III
  • B+W Circular polarizers
  • Really Right Stuff TVC-33 Carbon Fibre tripod
  • Arca Swiss D4 geared tripod head
  • 2x Elinchrom Quadra ELB400
  • Elinchrom Ranger ELB1200
  • Microsoft Surface Pro for tethered shooting (I’ve recently made the switch from Adobe Lightroom to Capture One 10)
  • Tethertools AeroTab Universal Tablet System L4
  • TetherTools USB 3.0 USB Right-Angle cable & Tetherboost Pro USB 3.0 Core Controller
  • Another tripod that shall-not-be-named because it was cheaper, it’s broken twice, and I hate it

All of this lives in a ThinkTankPhoto Airport Takeoff, a Logistics Manager 30, and a Tenba 38” Rolling tripod Grip case (with stands and umbrellas).

UpperWest by Minto
Christopher Simmonds Architect & RND Construction
Architectural Design by Ha2 Architecture

Today over half my business is architectural and interior photography, a far cry from the events and portraits that I started out with. I’ve refined my business into specific niches. I still photograph people, places, and people in places (I will always have a passion for environmental portraiture).

I provide photos that have value to my clients. They help them to sell: sell themselves, or their projects, and their businesses. I’ve grown with a few and we both get better work to show. Many of these projects have gone on to win awards for my clients.

Bathroom by Dean Large/Astro Design Centre
Kitchen by Dean Large/Astro Design Centre
Bathroom by Veronica Martin Design Studio

I admire photographers who have a singular vision and passion, and sometimes wish I had the same. But I’m also very fortunate and happy to be where I am and can support me and my family through photography, to be able to explore and grow and learn about myself too. At 36 I’m not the youngest person in my field, but I’m just as excited as anyone to see what will come next.

You can see more of Justin’s work at JVLPhoto.com, and follow him on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

#HybridDaveTuesdays has landed again! Straight into the flow this week, as it connects to last weeks post.. here goes!

We’ve all scrolled through Instagram and seen, usually 4th post from the top, a sponsored post. These paid ads end up there direct from companies who are paying Instagram for the spot, but here’s a secret for you… Just like last week when I told you that you can make money from stock, you can also make money by posting on Instagram! Take a look…

 

 

That’s me leaning awkwardly on the rear wing of a £130,000 supercar, but it isn’t my supercar! That car belongs to BMW. In fact, it only has 200 miles on the clock. It’s loaned out as a promo car as part of a larger fleet and, in exchange, BMW gets an invoice from me for posting about their awesome car and the expenses associated with that. Thing is, and perhaps this is a little nod to Scott, I’m not sure I enjoyed shooting the car quite as much as I enjoyed shooting the burger for Byron Burger!! So there’s a time when it’s appropriate to be ‘social media loud’ and as an influencer, so long as you’re backed up with justification for being loud, you should be! Let me show you that post and then we’ll get into the how’s of monetising Instagram!

 

 

Number One on your list is to establish yourself on Instagram. By this I mean checking the things off this list:-

  • Having a consistent theme to make yourself attractive to agents.
  • Having a substantial following, over 1k, to maximise your reach.
  • Having a good engagement rate to show your images are actually noticed. 5% is a good baseline.

Once you’ve got that sorted you can move on to dangling the carrot to agents to get the cash flow started.

 

 

This shot is one of the first I posted that made me some money as an influencer. Thing is, I took this photo 2 years before I posted it. The approach taken here was that the client, in this case The National Lottery, took their budget and split it across a load of influencers. The correct term here is Mirco Influencers, meaning that the brief has been sent out far and wide rather than to one or a handful of influencers. For this shot, bearing in mind I’d already taken it, I picked up £46. It starts out as pocket money and grows on success all the way up to the likes of @beautifuldestinations which is essentially an influencer account – let’s discuss the kind of things they achieve which you can achieve too.

 

 

As well as cash, and sometimes instead, you can get products too. This shot was taken for BoxFresh and as well as paying the bill they sent me a pair of trainers they were looking to promote. You’ll have noticed a lot of flat lay shots, I’m sure, where the product is the centre of attention but these ‘situational’ shots are also a big deal and as long as you have the time to get them they’re an easy income stream. Below is a Wilkinson Sword razor which is part of the range launched to coincide with the Star Wars release and both of these shots were taken on my iPhone in a few minutes. It really can be money for nothing sometimes.

 

 

So how do you make the cash start to flow? Well, once you’ve hit the three points on the checklist above it’s time to do these two things:-

  1. Get onto Facebook and search for ‘influencers’ – you’ll find a whole bunch of groups and pages dedicated to connecting influencers with brands, some big and some small, but wherever you start it’s a foot in the door to bigger things.
  2. Search Google for influencer agencies. One such agency is Tribe. When you’re signed up you can access their entire list of campaigns and find something that suits you. From there just compose a shot and caption and submit it along with your asking price – if you’re approved you can post it and get paid!

When you’re being noticed by agencies and brands after posting a few times you’ll find it becomes easier to get briefs and if there’s a particular brand you want to reach out to for any reason they can see from your account that you have some credibility behind your offer. Chances are they’ll contact you though, and from the first job there’s always the opportunity to prove yourself with repeat work and become a brand ambassador!

It’s as easy as that. I’ve given you 5 points altogether and once you’ve hit them you can start to work with the brands, score some free products, have cool experiences like hotel stays and activities, and see extra money start to be injected into your bank account.

I hope this has been helpful, and if you need an extra hand with anything I’ve talked about here please feel free to ask! I’m @hybriddave on Instagram and I’m happy to help :)

Much love

Dave

 

Hi, gang, and greetings from a really chilly Nashville (I’m here for PPA’s Imaging USA conference & expo. Great show – lots of good energy. You can catch my show coverage over on my twitter page or watch live show floor tours on my Facebook page).

On to the contest: We’re teaming up with the folks at Lexar Memory for an Instagram architectural photography competition, with loads of Lexar prizes for the winners (and even some for the runner-up and 3 honorable mentions).

How to Enter Your Architectural Photos in the Contest: 

  1. FOLLOW: Follow @lexarmemory & @kelbyonepics on Instagram
  2. POST: Post one of your original architectural images to Instagram and include the hashtag #KelbyOneLexar. (also, tag @lexarmemory & @kelbyonepics to make sure we see your entry!)
  3. SHARE: Now that you’ve entered, you can invite your other photography friends to enter the contest — just tag 3 people in the comments on the #KelbyOneLexar Architecture Photo Contest post

That’s it — you’re entered.

Deadline:
Entry deadline is Feb 15th at 12:00 midnight ET.

Judging:
I’ll be choosing 1 winner, 1 runner-up, and three honorable mentions (all of whom will receive awesome Lexar prizes – [since they make memory cards and card readers, but who doesn’t need more fast memory cards – am I right? Can I get a whoop whoop!].

Good luck everybody, and we’ll see you, and your images, on Instagram. :)

Other Contest News: Today’s the deadline to submit for your own gallery showing at the Gallery at KelbyOne
Last day to enter and all that. Just remember — all three of the people that have won so far, and had their own solo gallery shows (and wine and cheese receptions), all said the same thing: “I never thought I’d win.” So, if that’s what you’re thinking…you’re in good company. Here’s the link to enter.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. If you’re here at Imaging USA — I’m doing a book signing for my new book, “The Flash Book” at 11:30 today at the Rocky Nook booth on the Expo Floor. They are in booth #767 (they’ll have lots of my other books for sale, too!).

 

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