Posts By Scott Kelby

We actually launched the book last night with a live “Book Chat” (now kind of a tradition) where I talked about the book, how it works, and revealed the basis of “The System” through a series of tutorials, and I’m embedded the whole book chat below, in case you’ve got a chance to check it out.

These Book Chats are fun and very informal, but there’s a lot of cool Lightroom stuff, too. My publisher literally gave 50% deals on the book (in print or ebook or both), and the deals are good all week (here’s the link).

You can also order it direct from Barnes & Noble, or Amazon.com

Thanks for giving that a look — hope you found it helpful. Have a great weekend everybody, and we’ll catch ya next week. :)

-Scott

OK, this is technically a Photo Tip Friday but we’re running it on Monday because it’s just so good (and it’s just one minute long). It’s from portrait photographer Lenworth Johnson, and this is really great stuff. Check it out below:

Come on — you gotta love that! One light, and one reflector. Lenworth rocks! (his new class is now on KelbyOne. Here’s the link.

Aviation Photographers: Don’t Miss Out!

Can you imagine spending a couple of days with the man who literally wrote the book on aviation photography at a live seminar? If you’re into aviation photography, this is just an incredible opportunity to learn from the very best (in person on online). More details and tickets right here.

The Best Instructors in the World Are Here!

They’re all coming together for the Photoshop World Conference 2021 — August 31-Sept 2nd, 2021, and you can be a part of it from anywhere in the world this time around, as it’s three days, all online, all awesome, and you get the conference archived for a full year. For more information, or to reserve your spots now using the early-bird discount, click this link right here, and we’ll see you at the conference.

Check out this year’s instructor lineup:

Thanks it for today, folks. Have a good one!

-Scott

P.S. Last week on “The Grid” our topic was “Copyright, Model Releases and how to protect your work” with guests Intellectual Property Rights Attorney Ed Greenberg and Copyright advocate Jack Resnicki. Absolutely fantastic, eye-opening, educational, and funny episode. Here’s the link.

When we do an online conference, we usually wrap up the conference with a live Q&A session with each of the conference instructors (it’s way more fun and entertaining than it sounds, and our attendees love it). During these sessions you’ll invariably get a question like:

“Yesterday morning, Instructor [insert name here] said their favorite lens for shooting portraits was a 50mm, but in your session you said you wouldn’t recommend a 50mm lens for portraits, and then another instructor said they use it for weddings, but not for anything else. So, which one of you is correct?”

This type of conflicting information happens every day, all day, in the photography community, and the best place to see it in action is in your social media news feed, where one headline will read, “This is the only lens you need to take amazing landscape photos” and then 30-seconds later another headline scrolls by stating, “These are the three landscape lens every serious landscape photographer must own.” So, do I need one lens or three? Who’s right?

First, are those headlines “clickbait?

No. Neither of them are (even though folks who don’t fully understand the meaning of “Clickbait” would accuse them of being just that). Clickbait is a headline or photo that is deceptive or misleading. It’s designed to trick you into clicking on the article and then it doesn’t deliver what it says it would. If you clicked on that “The one lens you need…” article, you can bet they would tell you which lens it is and why they chose it. You may not agree with it, but that doesn’t make it deceptive or misleading.

The Bottomline

The bottomline is — the reason we get such conflicting info on all these topics is — what you’re reading (or hearing) are opinions. The person who wrote the “This is the only lens you need…” believes that’s all you need. The person who said you need three, believes you need three. These two writers could sit at the bar and argue their point until last call, and there would be no clear winner because they are their opinions based on their experience. If you can get the job done with one lens great, but if you the article and think three might better, that’s OK, too. The vast majority of what we read today about photography are opinion pieces, but that doesn’t make them any less valuable.

There is no “International Council of What’s Right in Photography” (That would be the ICWRP, which is an awful acronym and probably the real reason behind why their is no ICWRP). We’re all just trying to make informed decisions on gear and technique, and my goal is to seek out people’s whose opinions I can trust.

If Moose Peterson says a particular piece of gear is good, I know it’s good. I’ve followed his advice for years and it’s served me well. Same with Terry White. If Terry’s jazzed about it, I know I will be, too. Same for Joe McNally, Rick Sammon, Karen Hutton, Frank Doorhof, Tracy Sweeney, Dave Black — the list goes on, but these are people whose OPINIONS I trust. They all don’t always agree with each other, which is why, at the end of the day, we’re ultimately the one who has the final say. We gather up the info from our trusted sources, we see which ones make the most sense for us — for how we shoot and what we shoot, and we try to make the best choice we can. What I love about these photographers I trust is — their advice is real world stuff. It’s not about nerd tech specs or stuff measured on an oscilloscope in a lab environment. They just tell like it is, and that’s what I need to hear.

I’ve been doing this my whole career — taking in guidance from different sources I trust, and rarely have I been led astray, but even if a particular choice didn’t work out for me…it doesn’t mean it wasn’t the right choice for them.

I hope that helps shed a little light on why we have such conflicting and just straight up different info out there on everything from which camera, lens, technique, light, and even brand of memory card we all should be using. By the way — the one you should be using is whichever one I mention here on the blog. ;-)

Hope your Monday is a great one!

-Scott

It’s three full days, multiple training tracks, all online, Featuring your favorite Photoshop World instructors, and the Photoshop World experience, complete with an opening keynote, Midnight Madness, the attendee party, the Guru Awards — the whole nine yards as we aim to make it as close to the in-person event as possible, which means it’s going to be awesome!

Just like always, you can watch any session in any of the tracks, and we archive the entire conference for a full year so you can catch any sessions you missed or re-watch any sessions you want to see again.

Tickets and Info

For more information, or to reserve your spots now using the early-bird discount, click this link right here, and we’ll see you at the conference.

Have a great weekend, everybody!

-Scott

If you’re planning on shooting the fireworks Sunday for “the fourth” (or if you’re shooting off your own private display), check this out: A while back we did a special 4th of July episode of ‘The Grid’ all about how to take great fireworks shots. Erik (the Rocket Man) Kuna and I cover everything from the gear to the techniques to the post-processing in Photoshop and Lightroom and lots of helpful tips along the way.

We get right to it from the start (we have a lot to cover), and if you’re looking to make great fireworks shots tonight, we give the exact time-tested recipe of settings that can’t miss!

Here’s wishing and your family a happy, safe, and fun 4th of July. Hope you get some great shots! :)

-Scott

P.S. A big thanks and shout-out to the more than 1,000 photographers who attended our ‘iPhone Photography Conference.” It was a roaring success — it was so much fun — and we’re very grateful you were there to share it all with us.

PROGRAMMING ALERT: The iPhone Photography Conference starts tomorrow and runs for two full days and if you want to join the 1,000+ photographers from all over the world who will be spending the next two days learn how to take seriously great photos with your iPhone, it’s not to late to join in. Here’s the link to get your tickets (it’s two full days, two separate training tracks, and it’s all online —  plus you get a full year’s access to the archives of the conference to catch any sessions you missed or want to rewatch). Today we’re doing an orientation class and then I’m doing a class on “What makes a great photograph” — again — not too late to join us even today! :)

OK, I’m back from vacation, refreshed and ready to hit the ground running!

This new book on Macro photography is special

As a guy who writes books on photography, this is one I wish I had written — it’s an incredible new book on Macro photography from Canadian photographer and Macro shooting guru, Don Komarechka.

During my week off I got to spend some time with this book and he did a really incredible job from top to bottom. It’s an educational book that almost feels like a coffee table book, because it has so many big beautiful macro images, including some really unique stuff that you’re probably not going to learn about anywhere else. It’s like the book has one foot in the classroom and the other in an art gallery.

Sharing just a few pages here does nearly do the book justice (and it’s so detailed, I just cannot imagine how long it must have taken to put this together. You can tell Don really put his heart and soul into it.

You can pick up a copy of Don’s wonderful book (it would make a great gift) right here. My congrats to Don for a job well done — from one author to another, Don you knocked this one out of the park!

Glad to be back with you – thanks for stopping by, and don’t forget to catch “Travel Tuesday’s with Dave” tomorrow right here. :)

-Scott

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