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I did this interview a while back, but I had never actually seen it until I ran across it by accident earlier this past week, and the person interviewing me is Mubai-based Photoshop wizard (and super great guy all around) Unmesh Dinda.

He did such a great job in every aspect of this, from the production (just watch the first minute and you’ll see what I mean), to the questions he asked, to well…the whole thing. It was such a fun and different chat, and I give the credit to Unmesh – he is really, really good at this stuff and it was an honor to get the opportunity to chat with him.

If you get a sec, give it a listen (you can let it run in the background while you’re editing). :)

I’ve embedded the interview above, but I’m very grateful to Unmesh for his thoughtful questions, and for making the interview so much fun. He’s a very special guy, and we’ve been very fortunate to have him teach at the Photoshop World and to feature him in KelbyOne Online Courses.

Thanks for giving it a watch (or a listen in the background), and here’s wishing you a great weekend! :)

-Scott

#TravelTuesday has come around again and I, Dave Williams, am here as always! My departure date is getting closer and closer and I’m busy preparing and testing for my mission in Kofifernweh. I’ve been making minor adjustments and I’m happy to report that the turbocharger is now fully operational again. But that’s not what I’m here for – I’m here to talk pixels. More specifically, gifting them!

With a special time of year approaching it’s time for us to get thinking about what to do in the way of gifts. A random gift from Amazon may solve the issue of being empty-handed, however we can use our skills as photographers and artists to give a gift that really has meaning instead.

A portrait photographer can gift a portrait, a landscape photographer can gift a landscape, and a photographer with too many to choose from can gift a calendar. We have so many fans amongst our family and close friends that offer constant praise and act as personal cheerleaders to our growing photography skills that we could think smart and offer something bespoke that they would really love.

Having seen the headline of this post you could have very easily guessed what it was about and you’ve just read it, so surely there can’t be a lot left to say. Well, here comes the curveball!

Gifting photos to promote our business and to open doors is very, very effective. I’ve told the story of how I shot inside St Pauls Catherdal in London with a tripod – a feat only ever achieved by the BBC when they record and broadcast ceremonies – and it was all down to the promise of a print.

I got in touch with the marketing manager (who is always a good person to start with) and ensured I addressed them personally, by name. I asked very nicely what I wanted to ask without beating around the bush or wasting their time, offering a brief explanation of the circumstances, the intended result, and who I was. At the end as well as the usual line of ‘you can have copies of the images’ I added, ‘and I would love to print one for your office.’

That offer of a print, or the surprise gift of a print, is a fantastic way to market ourselves, make ourselves memorable, and form a lasting relationship. It’s also the best tool for leverage!

Short but sweet, but valuable, that’s todays post. Honestly worth its weight in gold!

Much love

Dave

This feature is so incredibly useful, I can’t believe Adobe hasn’t made a bigger deal of it. It’s kind of a “hidden right in front of our eyes” feature but I haven’t found any of my friends yet that even knew it was there.

Check out the short video below where I show what it is, where it is, and why it’s so awesome:

Is that super helpful or what? Time to add that one to your workflow. :)

Hope you all have a fantastic Monday! Go Bucs and #Rolltide!

Scott

Great video today from our friend and colleague, Jefferson Graham, about all the cool new stuff for iPhoneographers in the upcoming operating system update for the iPhone – IOS 15

(NOTE: Apple is having a big event on Tuesday to launch the new iPhones, maybe a new watch, and perhaps other cool stuff, so we’ll have access to this new stuff fairly soon). Anyway, check out this short video from Jeff:

Thanks, Jefferson. Can’t wait until Tuesday for news on the camera hardware side of things.

Have a great NFL football weekend, everybody. #RollTide and high-five to the Bucs for beating the Cowboys last night. That was more of a nail-biter than I had hoped, but we pulled it off. Now for a big Alabama win! :)

-Scott

It’s #TravelTuesday again and I, Dave Williams, am here from Salisbury Plain, home of Stonehenge, with about as much wisdom as I bring to the party every Tuesday. Let’s go!

This morning I woke up bright and early to shoot sunrise over Stonehenge, a neolithic stone monument here in the UK on Salisbury Plain. Whilst I was here, I noticed two other photographers had similar ideas, though not quite the same idea. One of them was up early and then disappeared before the sun was up. One appeared once the sun was up, missing the bit before dawn. It was a little odd because they both had cameras on tripods, so I wanted to quickly explain why I shoot the whole sunrise.

The photographer that was up before the dawn broke was shooting the blue hour. Blue hour is so named because the sky is largely blue because as the sun hasn’t breached the horizon yet its warm light doesn’t cast. It’s worth noting that it isn’t actually an hour, but can be longer or shorter depending on the season and latitude. Here’s my blue hour shot from this morning: –

The other photographer missed out on blue hour and shot golden hour. Again, this isn’t actually an hour, but it’s the time just after the sun breaks the horizon in the morning (or just before it does so in the evening) and, owing to various environmental and scientific factors including the effects of the wavelength of red light and the distance from us, we get a red or orange sky. Here’s what that looked like this morning for me: –

I was left a little baffled about why, if you’d dragged yourself out of bed at 6am, you wouldn’t shoot both types of light. It dawned on me, if you’ll pardon the pun, that perhaps they’d each only ever seen the one type of morning light and perhaps weren’t even aware of the other.

I know it’s a big ask, but here’s what I would like you all to do:

One day, when you have the time, get yourself up an hour before the sun is due to rise. The sky should still be a little dark and you will probably be able to see a star or two. Now, just watch what happens. Take a camera, or don’t take a camera, it’s entirely up to you, but be sure to observe exactly what is happening in the sky all around you. Notice the colours change. Watch what happens just before the sun breaks the horizon. Then how fast it moves. Watch where it goes. Watch how the light changes. Just take note of all that happens at sunrise and how it can affect a photo. Then, if you want, make a cup of tea and go back to bed.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. Sunrise totally beats sunset.

Have a great day!

Much love
Dave

Great tip from photographer and podcaster and just generally awesome guy, Frederick Johnson about a technique he learned when he was a military photographer to learn to break down barriers and getting access when you want to take a street portrait. It’s just a 60-second tip, but so interesting.

Thanks, Frederick. Don’t forget to check out Frederick’s new course on KelbyOne.

Have a great weekend, everybody!

-Scott

P.S. A big thanks to everyone around the world who came and spent this week with us at the Photoshop World Conference. It was a blast to see everyone, and we’re so grateful for the wonderful turnout, and awesome people we met along the way. Thank you again for your support and hope you learned a lot, laughted a lot, and make some new friends. :) 

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