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I want one!

I don’t even know all the specs yet, but between the features that Canon has announced, and the ones that reliable sources have leaked, I’m thinking it’s time for a new body! (Note: Don’t tell my wife. This is just between us. It’s a secret. Etc.).

Now, I don’t know what it costs (if Canon said how much they’re charging, I missed it), so there’s still a big question mark out there, but I’m hoping it’s priced right (so, basically not in the 1Dx III price range).

You had me at two card slots!

Not really (gotcha!). Seriously not a big deal to me whatsoever (I thought all the hand-wringing about the EOS R not having two slots was really overblown), so if it has two slots. great. I’ll probably leave one empty, and I don’t even know what type of cards it supports yet anyway). And the 8K video? I don’t shoot video, so it doesn’t help me one way or the other, but it seems a lot of people are really psyched about that.

What I do like is the very fast frames-per-second rate; the higher megapixels; the good possibility of a sensor with improved dynamic range, the IBIS (In Body Image Stabilization), and there are still more features yet to be announced. OK, I’m in. Ya know, in theory — still doesn’t know what it costs.

Shout to out San Diego and Phoenix

Great turnouts in both cities (thank you guys), with almost 550 photographers coming out for the two days. I met a ton of great folks; really had a lot of fun, had a great dinner with a buddy in San Diego’s Little Italy section, and got to see some more friends in Phoenix. Thanks to everybody that came out spend the day with me. Next stops: Houston then Los Angeles next month. I am having so much fun on this tour — I can’t wait!

Well, that’s it from here in the Delta Sky Club at Phoenix Airport’s Terminal #3. Got a red-eye home tonight at 11:25 am. Zzzzzzzz!

Have a happy Valentine’s Day (don’t forget your sweetie), and a great weekend. :)

-Scott

The Art of Zootography with Steven Gotz

The zoo is a wonderful place to begin or renew your love of photography! Join Steven Gotz at the Oakland Zoo as he takes you through all of the photographic opportunities that can be found at your local zoo. From shooting megafauna like lions and bears to microfauna like reptiles and insects, there’s always something to photograph at a zoo.

In this class you’ll learn about the gear and camera settings you can use, how to shoot through fencing and glass, how to use small flash in surprising ways, how to shoot animals in natural looking habitats, the importance of doing your research before you go, and so much more. As Steven takes you through the zoo he shares many tips and tricks to help you get the most out of your zoo experience.

In Case You Missed It: Moose Peterson’s African Safari Adventure

Moose goes on safari! With a career studying and photographing wildlife for over three decades, Moose has his first African safari and you’ve got a front row seat. Join Moose as he encounters the wide array of wildlife that calls the Mala Mala Game Reserve in South Africa home. Moose shares his take on the gear he brought along with his tips and techniques for capturing images that help tell the story of your trip.

I want to thank Scott and Brad for allowing me to share my travel photography process and tips. I’m an architectural photographer that started out using 4×5 view cameras, which just means I’ve been photographing architecture a long time.

Tips for Photographing Architecture While Traveling

You might think that when traveling I would focus on something different, like people or landscapes, but my real love is still photographing architecture. Now I even find myself planning trips that allow me to photograph beautiful and spectacular buildings and their interiors. Here are a few tips to help you capture great architectural images in your travels.

Strahov Monastery Library, Prague

Planning Your Shot List

The number one thing you can do is to plan your trip as far in advance as possible and give yourself plenty of time to do the research needed for success.

One of the first places I go is Google Images. I start with Google because they have almost every image ever made by mankind with links to websites where the images came from. I’ve found information there from other photographers that allowed me to know exactly where and at what time they took their photos. This can be very helpful when you don’t have time to scout the location in advance.

Dancing House, Prague

Google may be good for finding a location, but not for inspiration. That is where 500px.com comes in. If you want to get excited about your travel location and subjects, you’re going to love 500px. It is visual overload with great images that will motivate you. The not so good with 500px is that locations are not always provided, which can be frustrating.

Geisel Library, San Diego, California

The Gear

Now that you know what and where you want to photograph let’s talk a little bit about gear.

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I’m Dave Williams, here for #TravelTuesday at ScottKelby.com as always, and let me start by saying that right now I have zero trips booked! Zero! This is unusual for me, but I’ve got a lot going on with a new writing gig over at DIYPhotography, and I’m moving house this month. This is not good for me—I’m feeling very apprehensive and need to get a trip booked soon, so if anyone has any ideas of where I should go next, drop it in the comments!

This week, I want to address a subject which is very important in making our images stand out, and one which unfortunately seems to take a back seat. Depth! Giving our images the third dimension is very beneficial in keeping the viewer’s eyes on our image just a little longer. Considering a foreground, middle ground, and background is the simplest way to bring the third dimension to life, but there are some techniques that can help us do this. Lucky for you, I’ve slimmed it down into five steps! Let’s go!

Use Perspective

If we have different elements of a scene that provide perspective, we create a sense of depth. Converging lines do this very well. Converging lines draw our eyes through a subject, perhaps to another subject, and eventually end at the horizon.

The lines of the roofs and floors of the cabins in the foreground, on either side, extend to the background and converge. They converge on the centre cabin, but could just as easily converge on the horizon and do the same job.

Use Leading Lines

Similarly to using converging lines, we can use leading lines to convey depth in a scene with fantastic results. A simple way to do this is to use a wide-angle lens, but any lens will work fine if we’re considerate about what we’re doing. The lines don’t even need to be obvious—they can be subliminal or subconscious and work great.

Everything in this shot leads the eye to the jagged stack in the sea—all the lines, the clouds, and even my gaze. Yes, it’s a selfie.

Go Aerial

Aerial shots add depth through both perspective and atmosphere. Incorporating atmospheric conditions into our shot helps convey a sense of depth and dimension.

If we reinforce our aerial perspective through the use of another one or more techniques from this list, we are onto a winner.

Shoot Through Something

By literally adding another layer to our image we add a sense of depth. We can do this by using a part of the environment as a frame, or by selecting something like a plant to shoot through, focussing on either element to create the depth.

Consideration should be given to which element deserves focus. As you can see here, when I shot this grass on top of a Norwegian fjord, I decided it deserved the attention whilst the enormous depth of the background adds an enigmatic quality.

Isolate the Subject

By using depth of field to isolate our subject, we inherently create depth through bokeh. The blurred background helps to separate the subject from the background.

This Hairy Highland Cow was shot at f/2.8, which is a decent, wide aperture and lends itself to this kind of bokehed background.

How’s that for quick-fire education on a Tuesday!? I hope something in there was useful for you. But, seriously, I don’t have any trips booked! If you think of something, shout at me on my Insta. I’m feeling very tripophobic right now.

Define: Tripophobia [ trip-uhfoh-bee-uh ]

  1. (n) The fear of not having any trips booked.

Much Love
Dave

Last week I did a tutorial over at my Lightroom blog (LightroomKillerTips.com) and it was on how to create a 6-up layout in the print module (six tall images on one page). In that tutorial I showed how to use the Identify Plate so you can add text below your image. Even as I was writing the tutorial, I couldn’t help but think, “This is just a mess.”

It was Adobe that first brought professional type to computing — it’s in their DNA — heck a ton of our fonts have Adobe in the title, but when it came to Lightroom, it’s like Adobe got amnesia. Lightroom has the most limited type features of any program you have today on your computer. Any of them. Even Apple’s free TextEdit app runs rings about Lightroom’s type features…with one exception and that’s what this post is about.

Take a look at the Type panel from Lightroom Classic’s Book module (below):

Tracking, Leading, Kerning, Baseline Shift…actual real type controls and even text style presets. Real type controls, and this is already in Lightroom Classic inside the Book module.

Dear Adobe: Please copy this panel over to the Print Module and the Slideshow module.

You’ve already created it. It’s got a UI. It’s already a panel inside of Lightroom. It’s already there, just one module over. Please make type in Lightroom at least decent.

I know this might not be on the top of your Lightroom wish list, but this is already there. It’s not like we’re asking for a new feature — just take one that’s already there and copy it to where it will do more good. It’s low-hanging fruit. Pick it!

Thanks for listening. :)

-Scott

P.S. I’m off to San Diego tomorrow for my “Ultimate Photography Crash Course” seminar on Wed, and then in Phoenix on Thursday. Nearly 500 photographers are coming out – if you’re not signed up, it’s not too late. Here’s the link for tickets and more info.

That was our topic Wednesday on “The Grid” in response to a Petapixel.com article titled: “Adobe, This is Why Photographers Are Hating On You.”

I’ve embedded the episode (below); Not a lot of visuals, so you can just let it play in the background if you like. The feedback on this episode has been great, and we covered a lot of interesting angles and viewpoints. Hope you’ll give it a listen. :)

Here’s wishing you a great ‘no hater’s allowed’ weekend. :)

I look forward to seeing a whole bunch of you next week in San Diego on Wednesday and Phoenix on Thursday for my full-day seminar (not too late to come out and spend the day with me if you want. Tickets and info here.

Cheers,

-Scott 

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