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Canon just announced perhaps one of the most anxiously awaited new cameras in years — the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV. I got a chance to do a shoot with it (see the video below), and I have to say, it’s not only probably the best camera Canon’s ever made, it’s arguably one of the best cameras ever made, period. I just fell in love with it!

First, check out the video where I go over all the main specs (and I share a few shots from my first shoot with it).

https://youtu.be/nJmq0AkW1C4

That video covered all the really big features, but…
there’s all sorts of other cool stuff in this camera, so head over to Canon’s site to read the press release about all the other stuff, like built-in light flicker correction and a new noise algorithm, and enhanced scene recognition and face detection capabilities, and all that type of stuff.

In the meantime, here’s some more picture of the body, which look astonishingly like the old 5D Mark III body!

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Above: The back view which look very familiar. 

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Above: Side view with lens attached (seriously, where you would be without these helpful captions)?

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Above: What could this be? Wait! Wait! I know! Is it — the top of the camera? Yes, you are correct (said the council on the glaringingly obvious. So why did I make these captions at all? Because it looks better!). 

Canon also announced a couple of new lens (one that I am particularly interested in is the newly updated 16-35mm and they also announced a 24-105mm. Both expected in October I believe).

OK, that’s the big news today. I’m in Indianapolis with my seminar today. I expect to meet a bunch of very excited Canon shooters there today!

Best,

-Scott

 

LargeFormatPrinting

Fine Art Photography: Creating Large Format Prints with Steve Hansen
Make your fine art prints stand out from the pack! Join Steve Hansen for an in-depth look at all of the steps involved in creating a large format fine art print. In this class you’ll learn what makes a print a fine art print, how Steve takes a photo from capture to post production to print, the importance of a test print, and how to decide what type of paper, ink, and printer is best for your type of photographs. Throughout the class Steve shares tips, tricks, and techniques for working in Lightroom, Photoshop, and with all of the materials used in creating the final print. Creating a fine art print is all about bringing your vision to life in a print, and by exploring a variety of finishing options that fit your style you can add value to your work and make it stand out from all of the rest.

It’s our “Throwback Thursday” Class
In case you missed it first time around – It’s all about the edit! You’ve just had an awesome photo session and now you need to narrow it down to just the best ones. How do you do it? Join Peter Hurley as he walks you through a series of live headshot sessions and then talks through his editing process with the subjects at the end. Peter is joined throughout the class by Scott Kelby, and together they edit through multiple different shoots that Scott has brought in. Editing is all about narrowing shots down to just the ones that will go into your portfolio to help you get more work. Learn how to develop this muscle and find your own shabangs!

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Exploring the City with Hasselblad X1D
Hello everyone, My name is Ali Rajabi, I am Hasselblad Master and Photoshop Expert based in New York. Let me start my blog with the name of God, and a very special thanks to Scott who let me to write again as his guest blogger. Oh, It was 6 years ago that I wrote my first blog here and you know, Time flies !!!

Every person who is close to me, they know that I am a photographer who believes in a combination of tools and ideas. When you know more about the tools, it can help you to expand your projects and will reveal the creativity that is inside you. As you might know, the Hasselblad company introduced the first mirrorless medium format camera X1D (it is not yet fully developed) in the world some weeks ago. So, they asked me to take some shots with it and I was delighted to have this opportunity to work with this brand new camera that only a few people in the world have had a chance to test.

It was a 3-day project and I decided to take some photographs in the streets of New York based on the theme,”Freedom.” Although I had a very short period of time to work with the X1D, I did my best to explore the features of it. Honestly, I don’t want to have a deep dive into technical sides and compare it with other brands because you can find very useful articles about the technical features on the internet. But I am going to share my photos, impressions and experiences as a photographer. Although we know, none of us can run from the technical side, ever.

So lets start with some Q&A, and after that I invite you to see some behind the scenes pictures:

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I really liked the shades of light and working with colors, specially when I edited them in Camera Raw.

1) The company said X1D is a Game Changer, Is it ?
If I want to answer this question, we need to know more about the definition of the word “Game Changer.” To me, a game changer is a person or thing that will help and save you in a moment that nothing else can. They do magic in an appropriate time. So, I think Hasselblad X1D is a game changer between the cameras that produce high quality images. Moreover it is handy, light weight, and with its mirrorless feature it captures the exact moment of your scene. It keeps you in the dark in the situations that you don’t want to have the attention of your subjects, especially in the streets when you are taking picture of people. Imagine that you have a 50 megapixel sensor that is a mirrorless medium format and will produce a photo with 14 stops of dynamic range. It rocks.

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I took this shot at Bryant Park, There were lots of people who didn’t feel that I am taking their pictures. Anyway, I showed them the final Image.

2) Is it a camera for professionals or everyone?
If I want to be honest, even if you have a budget to buy it, it is not a camera for everybody, although I believe Hasselblad expanded their audience from the moment that they announced the X1D and it was some of the most positive feedback that I felt. I think it is a camera for a person who knows and wants to do a specific project. I can imagine this camera in the hands of fine art, landscape, fashion, portrait, street and wedding photographers. What I am saying is you should be a person who is completely aware of your skills and abilities as a photographer or as an artist. It is not the kind of camera that you pick up and it shoots as much as you can. Like tegh tegh tegh tegh….

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I was standing in the middle of 6th Ave, Manhattan with my tripod to capture the pedestrians.

3) Is it worth to pay $9000 to buy this camera?
This is a question that everybody asks. I know there are lots of different aspects to answer this question, but I want to keep it simple and answer it very short even if you have your own reasons to reject mine. When you want to go to the next level of your career, you need to pay for it and invest in it. It can be an investment on education, tools, or moving to a different location for the next chapter of your life. I believe the most important question is, is it the right moment for you to move to the NEXT LEVEL ? This is the question that you need to answer for yourself based on the situation that you are. When you find out, I am pretty sure you will decide what is best for you.

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Everything in this world can be Freedom for everybody, It depends that how do you define it.

4) Can you share some of your experiences about the specs of the X1D?
As a photographer I want to have a camera that fits in my hand perfectly, and the X1D is a well designed camera for this part of my taste. It is very handy and portable. The sensor that is located in the viewfinder is very useful for switching between the LCD panel and viewfinder itself. The camera startup is kind of slow right now but the people at Hasselblad told me, they will upgrade the firmware for this issue. The touch functionality on display is very fast, user friendly and the quality of LCD is perfect compared to previous Hasselblad products except the H6D. You only have one focus point and it works based on the contrast detection. There is no True Focus system on it.

The XCD lenses with integral lens shutter are 30mm, 45mm and 90mm with the speed of 60 minutes to 1/2000, but you will be able to use an adapter for using the H-system lenses. I can not talk about the battery life because it was a prototype camera. I really liked the way of changing white balance and ISO on the viewfinder. One of my main concerns was using the high ISO in low light situations, and when I compare it one on one with my Canon 5D Mark III it surprised me with the result. As you can see in the photo below in their 1:1 compare, the color and the quality on X1D is much better than Canon 5D Mark III. You can see the details in the shadows and the texts on the labels are clear. It should be.

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(X1D Left), (5D Mark III, Right) – ISO: 6400 , Focal Length: 36mm, F:8, 1/100,
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Even at the Low ISO:100, X1D (left) produces more accurate light & color with clear details. Although the focal length, shutter speed and ISO are the same, pay attention to the sparkle on the word “Radio” and street lamp.
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Always keep moving forward, you will never know what will happen.
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There is a difference between knowing the path and walking the path.

Anyway, these are just the result of my 3 days experiences with the prototype X1D. I am pretty sure Hasselblad will resolve every issue in the final release at the end of August or early September. You can find more details about it on the Hasselblad website. The only thing that I can emphasize is, continuity is the key of every success. You need to work hard to achieve the goals that you want in the world of photography and art. Tools are always necessary and you can not ignore this fact. But what is more important than the tools is the person who is using them. Be creative, be a hard worker and always update your knowledge in every aspect of your life.

 

The photos below are some behind the scenes from when I was shooting on the streets. Special thanks to Maryam Moradi who captured them.

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Best Wishes
-Ali Rajabi

You can see more of Ali’s work at Ali-Rajabi.com, and follow him on Instagram @nightblueman and @rajabiphotography, Twitter, and Facebook.

1000walks

This is just insane! So exciting, and just crazy! In just one week, over 1,009 cities already have photo walks approved as part of my 9th Annual Worldwide Photo Walk, sponsored by Canon. WOW!!!

We have NEVER had this many walks, this quickly, and I’m just absolutely delighted (and very thankful to our Leader coordinator this year, Jeanne Jilleba, who has been working her butt off getting all of these walks approved so quickly).

If you checked last week, and there wasn’t a walk in your city yet…
…I’d go back and check again. Chances are, there is one now! (link)

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Above: This is the group shot from Paris a couple of years ago, led by our friend Serge Ramelli (that’s him bottom right corner giving a thumbs up – I’m behind him standing to the right in the black Adobe hoodie. Photo by Kalebra). 

We’re still accepting new cities
If there’s not a photo walk in your area, it’s not too late to volunteer to be a Walk Leader. Head to the official “Worldwide Photo Walk” site, and click on the Lead a Walk button to apply.

Thanks to everybody who has signed up for a walk, and to everyone who has volunteered to lead one, and to Canon for making this all happen (and for providing lots of amazing prizes for the contest portion of the walk). This is just awesome!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Whoo Hoo!!! :)

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Above: The Dewitt Wallace Periodicals Room at the New York Public Library on 5th Ave. in Manhattan, taken with a Canon 11-14mm super wide-angle lens on a Canon EOS 5Ds.

Hi gang, and happy Monday. I shared the image you see above on Instagram this past weekend, and as expected, one of the photographers that follows me there wrote:

“Lightroom can easily straighten the verticals with just a few clicks, hint hint.”

Of course! I know that: I’ve written about it in my books, talked about it in my online classes, etc., but it was nice of him to let me know, anyway. ;-)

Here’s the thing…
I like it just the way it is, or I would have fixed it before I posted it on Instagram.

Even though the verticals are not “technically correct” (meaning the walls are leaning inward) I love the look a super wide angle gives. I know the verticals aren’t straight, but I love that look. It’s breaking the rules on purpose.

It’s just like breaking the “rules of composition” — if you don’t know what you’re doing and you break the rules, you’re a “goober.” If you know what the rules are, but you break them intentionally because you like the way it looks, then you’re an artist.

If I wanted the straight verticals look, I would either have used a tilt-shift lens when I shot it, or I would have fixed it in Lightroom, but I left the verticals untouched (and I generally do), in all my super wide angle images unless (and this is a biggie) it looks bad to me. That’s the “art” part of it, and a decision the photographer taking the image makes. In this case, I don’t believe the “technically correct” shot looks better. You might feel differently. See below.

verticals2b

Above: Here’s what the same shot looks like when you fix the verticals in Lightroom. This is a more “technically correct” shot, but I don’t like it nearly as well.

Yes, the walls are now straight and not leaning inward. But, to me, the shot lost some of it’s “epicness.” It’s now cropped almost into a square, and I had to use Content Aware Fill and some Cloning to fill the edges. It’s really not a super wide-angle shot any longer. I don’t like what it did to the ceiling, and I just don’t like it in general. I miss my bendy walls. :)

Now, all that being said…
…it’s very possible that you prefer the second shot (the shot with corrected verticals) better and I’m OK with that. That lens distortion in the first shot (the walls leaning in) doesn’t agree with everybody — though one guy on Instagram wrote:

“…the distortion really draws me into the photo.”

I dig that guy. Plus, I agree, and I think that is part of the power of not correcting — it kind of draws you in. Anyway, when you take images really wide like this, this is a call (to correct or not correct) you’ll get to make, and I’m sure a lot of people will choose to fix the verticals. I’m cool with that too.

My style is to not fix the verticals (scroll through the images on my Instagram page and you’ll see this look again and again, along with the occasional corrected shot, too, but for me, that’s rarely the call I make). That’s the awesome thing about creating art. Everybody gets to do their “own thing.” If we all saw art the same way, what a boring world this would be.

Technically Correct vs. Artistically Correct?
Does your photo look better to you a stop under-exposed? How about 2-stops over-exposed? There’s a difference between a mistake, and an artistic decision. At the end of the day, this is a call only you can make, and as long as you’re making the call intentionally, then go make your art. :-)

A Quick Shout Out….
…to the super friendly folks in Little Rock, Arkansas who came out to catch my keynote presentation at Photo Expo 2016 last Friday night. I met so many wonderful photographers, and enjoyed the Little Rock hospitality (and the entire audience “calling the Hogs”) very much indeed. Also, a big thanks to Canon for inviting me to be there in the first place.

Have a great Monday everybody, and I hope I have given you something to think about today. :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. A TON of new cities around the world just posted photo walks this weekend as part of my “9th Annual Worldwide Photo Walk” (sponsored by Canon). If you looked last week and your city didn’t have a walk organized yet, I’ll bet it does now! Here’s the link to check. 

P.S.S. I’m in Indianapolis on Thursday with my seminar. Hope you can join me. 

t-shirts

Be the envy of your fellow walkers when you show up to the walk sporting your stylish, official Worldwide Photo Walk T-shirt.

Not only will you look particularly snazzy, you’ll have done something bigger than just showing up your fellow walkers — because 100% of the profits from the sale of these t-shirts goes directly to the Springs of Hope Orphanage in Nakuru, Kenya to feed, clothe and care for 31 very awesome kids.

But it’s not just t-shirts. It might be chilly in some parts of the world. That’s why we have…

sweat

Sweat Shirts (in White and Ash Gray), long sleeve t-shirts, and even Hoodies (in White, and Heather Gray). They all look awesome, and you will, too (both inside and out). :)

NOTE: A special thanks to Rob Jones at Towner Jones Photography for hosting our t-shirt store each year. Rob is the man!

But what if I don’t want a t-shirt?
You can still help. You can donate directly to the orphanage by giving $1 (if each photo walker gave just $1 we would hit our goal no problem), $5, $10 — really as much as you want to give. They have huge needs at the orphanage, and they need our support (right now, they need a small bus to transport the kids to school, and we’re going to help).

Here’s the link to donate — do it right now (btw: you will feel awesome if you do this!)

So, what is Springs of Hope Kenya? 
Watch this short video from Molly Waits and the kids themselves. Just watching this will help.

https://youtu.be/umfLabd40Po

Think of how much we all spend on gear…
…and then think how little it would take for each one of us photographers to give some hope, food and a future for these deserving kids. Please give anything you can. Even just one dollar makes a difference. It matters.

Thanks everybody for opening your hearts to this orphanage. Since 2009 we’ve raised more than $100,000 for the orphanage and this year, they’ve got some really big needs — please join with us in helping them. This is the stuff we are called to do.

Have a great weekend everybody and….order those shirts! :)

Best,

-Scott

 

 

 

 

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