Category Archives Photography

It’s not a print on metallic paper — it’s actually printed on metal, and when you see it in person it’s like that day when you saw your first 4K TV at BestBuy and your jaw dropped. I got my first metal print back in 2009, from the same folks I got this one from — ImageWizards — and I have to say, I am once again absolutely blown away by how it looks. It’s like a 4K TV print.

Here’s a picture of the print (above); hanging in my living room. It was taken the day before my travel photography workshop in Guilin, China, last year. It was shot on a Canon EOS R (30.2 megapixels), and that print you see above is 60″x40″ (whoo hoo!), and it looks just stunning in person. Now all I want to do is order more prints on metal (and I’m going to do just that this weekend, but probably 24×36″ size or smaller for the rest).

One thing that really surprised my wife and me was — despite its ginormous size, it’s not really heavy. It’s surprisingly light (especially considering that it’s metal), and it comes mounted to a frame for hanging.

I found this video on their YouTube page (it’s embedded below) about how they prep your images for printing on metal. It’s less than 90-seconds long, and when you see the lengths they go when prepping your print for color accuracy and consistency, it’s pretty amazing. They call it a promo video, but again, it’s really about their process, so it’s worth a quick look:

They are offering a discount to my readers this weekend

I told them I was going to do this post about my print, and so they are offering my readers a 15% off deal right now, so go to ImageWizards.com and use the code Kelby 15 at checkout to get the deal. Thanks to the folks at ImageWizards for the deal, and for rockin’ that 60×40 print — it looks incredible (and makes me wish we could still travel).

We talked about all this on The Grid on Wednesday

I’ve embedded the episode, but I set it so it starts right when Erik and I start talking about the print, so you can pick it up right there — just hit play.

If you’re as passionate about printing as I am, I hope you’ll check them out. I just cannot recommend them enough (and no, they’re not a sponsor), but I’ve been getting prints from them since back in 2009, and it’s been a love affair with their work ever since. Great people, and a great product. If you get one of their metal prints, send me a pic on Facebook or Twitter — I’d love to see it! :)

Next Tuesday The Photoshop Conference Kicks Off

We’re going to have over 1,000+ photographers learning from an all-star crew of the best Photoshop instructors anywhere and you do not want to miss out. Don’t wait and hear how awesome it was after the fact — instead, why not be a part of it? It’s next Tuesday and Wednesday (July 14-15, 2020); it’s all live-streamed online so you can watch it wherever you are; plus all the classes are archived for you until the end of the year, and tickets are available right now at kelbyonelive.com — You’ve been wanting to really learn Photoshop — now’s your chance! :)

Hope you all have a great weekend. Look out for each other. Stay safe, love your neighbor, and we’ll catch you back here next week.

-Scott

#TravelTuesday is here and I, Dave Williams, have this week’s installment of wisdom for you, free of charge!

They say a picture is worth a thousand words, but who are “they” and what else do “they” say? Sometimes, all we need is a little inspiration, a little motivation, and a little quote. From the world of travel and photography, here are some of my favourites to put you in the right frame of mind on this sunny Tuesday before travel comes back to life. Well, it’s sunny here in the UK! Hopefully, it’s sunny where you are, too!

Which is my favourite photograph? The one I’m going to take tomorrow.

Imogen Cunningham

It’s weird that photographers spend years or even a whole lifetime, trying to capture moments that added together, don’t even amount to a couple of hours.

James Lalroupi Kelvom

If I could tell the story in words, I wouldn’t need to lug around a camera.

Lewis Hine

Great photography is about depth of feeling, not depth of field.

Peter Adams

The camera is an excuse to be someplace you otherwise don’t belong. It gives me both a point of connection and a point of separation.

Susan Meiselas

My life is shaped by the urgent need to wander and observe, and my camera is my passport.

Steve McCurry

If you want to be a better photographer, stand in front of more interesting stuff.

Jim Richardson

You can look at a picture for a week and never think of it again. You can also look at a picture for a second and think of it all your life.

Joan Miro

All photographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.

Richard Avedon

You don’t take a photograph – you make it.

Ansel Adams

To me, photography is an art of observation. It’s about finding something interesting an ordinary place… I’ve found it has little to do with the things you see and everything to do with the way you see them.

Elliott Erwitt

What I like about photographs is that they capture a moment that’s gone forever, impossible to reproduce.

Karl Lagerfeld

There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.

Ansel Adams

I really believe there are things nobody would see if I didn’t photograph them.

Diane Arbus

Photography has nothing to do with cameras.

Lucas Gentry

The picture that you took with your camera is the imagination you want to create with reality.

Scott Lorenzo

Taking pictures is like tiptoeing into the kitchen late at night and stealing Oreo cookies.

Diane Arbus

It’s one thing to make a picture of what a person looks like, it’s another thing to make a portrait of who they are.

Paul Caponigro

Photography for me is not looking, it’s feeling. If you can’t feel what you’re looking at, then you’re never going to get others to feel anything when they look at your pictures.

Don McCullin

We are making photographs to understand what our lives mean to us.

Ralph Hattersley

Photography is a way of feeling, of touching, of loving. What you have caught on film is captured forever… It remembers little things, long after you have forgotten everything.

Aaron Siskind

When I have a camera in my hand, I know no fear.

Alfred Eisenstaedt

Photography is the story I fail to put into words.

Destin Sparks

The eye should learn to listen before it looks.

Robert Frank

It’s not enough to just own a camera. Everyone owns a camera. To be a photographer, you must understand, appreciate, and harness the power you hold.

Mark Denman

The context in which a photograph is seen affects the meaning the viewer draws from it.

Stephen Shore

The way that light hits objects, I think, is one of the more important things that sculpture and photography share.

Rashid Johnson

What do we feel when we look at a good photograph? We just want to be there, right at the exact moment that photo taken.

Mehmet Murat Ildan

When a moment in front of me appears to be particularly special, whether it be by beauty or experience, I capture it. I usually find a reason to justify taking that photo – symmetry, or color, or contrast – and it’s my hope that my photography sheds light onto what I see and do on a daily basis.

Connor Franta

The art of photography is all about directing the attention of the viewer.

Steven Pinker

It takes a lot of imagination to be a good photographer. You need less imagination to be a painter because you can invent things. But in photography, everything is so ordinary; it takes a lot of looking before you learn to see the extraordinary.

David Bailey

Ok, so that was 31, but who was counting?! I hope there was some inspiration in there for you and I hope you all have a great day!

Much love

Dave

If you’re planning on shooting the fireworks tomorrow for “the fourth” (or if you’re shooting off your own private display), check this out: Last year we did a special 4th of July episode of ‘The Grid’ all about how to take great fireworks shots. Erik (the Rocket Man) Kuna and I cover everything from the gear to the techniques to the post-processing in Photoshop and Lightroom and lots of helpful tips along the way.

We get right to it from the start (we have a lot to cover), and if you’re looking to make great fireworks shots tonight, we give the exact time-tested recipe of settings that can’t miss!

Stay safe; keep the heck away from everybody, and here’s wishing and your family a happy, safe, and fun 4th of July. Hope you get some great shots! :)

-Scott

Zoo photography counts as travel photography, so for #TravelTuesday today I want to share my top tip for photographing animals in the zoo. I’m Dave Williams and I’m here every Tuesday on ScottKelby.com—let’s begin!

I realise that zoos aren’t for everyone, so let’s get that out of the way straight off. Personally, I’m careful to ensure that any zoo I visit has credibility in conservation because, as an animal lover, there’s nothing I loathe more than visiting a zoo with animals that aren’t properly cared for. There is a difficult balance, I realise that, but so long as there’s no mistreatment etc., I’m happy to visit.

I won’t mess around with a clickbait-esque title—I’ll cut to the chase. My number one tip for photographing animals in the zoo is…

Make it look wild!

It can be tricky to achieve this, but making the scene look wild will add so much to our images. Freeing the animal back into the wild gives a much greater connection to the animal’s natural environment, and that connection will cause the viewer to lend more appreciation to our image.

To achieve this our best tactic is to ensure the background is absolutely clear of any “zoo clutter.” By this I mean any unnatural enclosure features, like cheesy fake rocks, fences, walls, cables, walkways, all the stuff we see at the zoo that makes it so fake.

Something else we can do is crop in close on the animal, perhaps not dissimilar to a portrait shoot showing just the head and shoulders. This will bokeh out any unwanted background and give star-focus to the animal we’re photographing, revealing their character. When we do this a key portrait rule applies: always focus on the eyes! Bonus tip: if the animal is at an angle, focus on the closest eye.

And, finally, also themed around aperture, is this: –

When shooting through a mesh fence, like in a predator enclosure, we can lose the fence by shooting wide open if the subject is a reasonable distance from the fence. This wide aperture pushes our plane of focus and depth of field away from us (and from the fence), so we can often get a cool image with no fence in it.

I hope that tip was useful, and if you keep an eye on my Instagram for the next few days you can catch a few more tips!

Much love

Dave

If you can’t wait for the print version, the eBook version is on Amazon right now. The print version is literally on press as we speak (so don’t let the late date that Amazon put on it scare you off — it’ll be here fairly soon). If you missed the news about this major update to the bestselling book on digital photography in history, check out the video below.

Here’s the link to the eBook edition (available now)

Here’s the link to pre-order the print edition (on press now).

This is for photographers who do their own portrait retouching:

We just released a Photoshop class I did on “25 Quick and Easy Portrait Retouching Techniques for Photographers.” I wanted photographers who wind up doing their own retouching to have a resource where they could go and quickly learn exactly the particular retouch they need to know right now for the image they’re working on. So, if they needed to learn how to trim eyebrows, there’s a quick lesson on just that. Hotspots? Check. One eye higher than the other? Got it. Need to reduce wrinkles — go right to that lesson and there it is — quick and easy. Hope you’ll give it a look this weekend. Here’s the link.

We’re just a few weeks away from our Photoshop Conference

It’s two full days, all live online with with two simultaneous training tracks, and an incredible team of instructors. Best of all, it’s all online, so everybody, everywhere can attend, and it’s so affordable anybody can be a part of it. Hundreds of photographers have already signed up – you can too at https://kelbyonelive.com/photoshop-conference – sign up right now to get the best pricing.

Have a great weekend, everybody. Safe safe and sane and we’ll catch you next week. 🙂

-Scott

Whether you shoot for fun or you’re an amateur turning pro, this little list contains the secrets to success. I’m Dave Williams, it’s #TravelTuesday, and it’s time to get on with things!

1 – Be committed

Take the sunrise analogy. If we’re committed, we’re there for the first light of the day, ready and keen to get started. If we’re willing to sacrifice a warm, comfortable bed in exchange for a cold, early morning, we’re demonstrating our commitment to travel photography and to ourselves.

2 – Think laterally

If we go where the crowds go, we’re more likely to take a shot that the crowds already got. If we think outside the box, however, we’re far more likely to create something unique that stands out amongst the crowd. It’s worth putting in the work to create something unique.

3 – Research hard!

If we put in the research behind our shots, we can plan for things that don’t often happen, like obscure moon phases or annual events. Putting ourselves in the right place at the right time will allow us to achieve something different, and meticulous planning results in us knowing where to be and when to be there. This research should present itself in the form of a shot list, allowing us to prioritise and plan whilst on a trip.

4 – Know your gear and techniques

Practicing hard and educating ourselves with regard to our gear and the techniques we can use will pay dividends when we’re on location. Having our methods honed so they become second nature means we can get far more done in a shorter time, and react to any changes effectively. We don’t need to travel to far-away locations to practice, we can do it close to home. When we are well-practiced it shows in our work.

5 – Learn patience

Patience is the most important tool in our bag—this is something I’ll always remember hearing Scott say. One characteristic of a great travel photographer is identifying and composing a photo, then waiting for everything to be right. The right light, the right colours, the right mood, the right anything—it often takes patience to have everything right.

6 – Be ready

Despite the need for patience, we also need to have the ability to reach quickly, responding to situations that develop around us. We need to understand the exposure triad (ISO, shutter, aperture) and know how to quickly apply it by touch only, so a fleeting moment doesn’t pass us by.

7 – Understand composition

We need to know when and how to apply the rule of thirds, leading lines, diagonals, the golden spiral, and every other compositional technique, as well as knowing when to break these rules with patterns, contrast, and depth.

8 – Self critique. A lot!

At the end of the day, when the shooting’s done, examine your work very carefully. Then take a break and come back to it again for another examination. Critique yourself and actively look for your mistakes so you know where to improve next time.

Photography is competitive, in some cases, more so than others. The most important thing is to have fun, and if we practice hard and achieve the most we possibly can, it becomes less stressful and easier to have fun.

Much love
Dave

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