Category Archives Photography

I am so, so excited about this new full-day seminar — and here’s what’s it’s based on; if I could spend just one day with a friend, and I only had that one day to give them a giant leap forward in their photography, what would I teach them that would have a real, immediate impact on their photography. What could I show them, that would change their photography from that day forward. That’s exactly what I put in this semimar.

Check out this video and you’ll totally get it.

This video gives you all the details. I hope you’ll give it a look.

Who should attend this new seminar?

It’s not aimed at pros (though there will be some pros there for sure); but it’s for landscape photographers, portrait photographers, travel photographers, flash shooters, natural light portrait folks, wedding photographers, and street shooters, fine art photographers, food photographers, and anyone who is just tired of struggling along, and knows there’s got to be an easier, faster, better way to make great images.

It kicks off next month in Indianapolis and Minneapolis

…and I want you to come out and spend the day with me. You have nothing to lose — it’s risk-free because it’s 100% money-back guarantee if it’s not the best photography seminar, you’ve ever attended, at any price ever. Period! Don’t spend the next five years “paying your dues” and learning everything the hard way, or not learning it at all. If you’re ready to make a big jump in your skills and start taking great images now, this is the one day that can change everything.

It’s just $99 for the full day of training and includes a detailed printed workbook (the biggest one I’ve ever written by the way) bonus videos and more goodies. It’s a kick-butt day and you’re going to learn a lot no matter where you are on your photographic journey.

Here’s the ticket info for Indy (Tuesday, May 7, and Minneapolis, (Thursday, May 9). I hope I get to meet you in person next month for a day that’s going to change everything!

Have a great Easter weekend, everybody!

-Scott

P.S. More cities and dates to be announced soon, but we’re going pretty much everywhere in the US, so hopefully we’ll be in your hometown soon. :)


Last night, I sat down to write this post and I had a bit of a situation. Well, a bit of a disaster actually! I dropped my phone onto my laptop screen and everything went dark. I’ve just taken my laptop to Apple and owing to my carelessness, I now have a five-day wait and a £460 bill to pay for a new retina screen, and it’s caused a delay in publishing this post! My apologies. Let’s get cracking!

So, every #TravelTuesday, here on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider, I land with a little something for you from the world of Photoshop, photography, travel, and life. Today, I’m going to tell you all about something you should be using, and which Scott showed you yesterday—Adobe Spark Page.

Adobe Spark is a creative suite in itself, within the Adobe ecosystem, which allows users to create social graphics, webpages, and videos on a web or mobile platform, and it’s awesome! In fact, all my header graphics here on Scott’s blog and on my own blog at capturewithdave.com are made using Adobe Spark Post.

Scott used Adobe Spark Page to create his story yesterday about his visit on the USS Harry S. Truman, and it delivered an amazing result both in terms of its aesthetic prowess and its storytelling ability. The user interface for creators is top-notch, as is the interface for the end user.

The app allows us to quickly and easily lay out our images, videos, and words, and it encourages good design and placement. The text alignment and animation creates a user experience with apparently seamless links from one section to the next. The ability to decide on the positioning of our images in a variety of styles, and with additional copy over them, gives us the ability to customise our page and truly tell the story in the way we want it to be seen. 

As a photographer, I am of course a creative, but one friend of mine has some strong words which this app brings to life for me. Graphic Designer and KelbyOne instructor Dave Clayton says in his latest awesome class that a graphic designer is a photographer’s best friend. Knowing how to present your work in the best possible way is important for a photographer, and a graphic designer can help you to do this. It seems that this series of apps is the first step towards that goal.

Adobe Spark is part of your Adobe Creative Cloud subscription, and its best comparison is that it’s basically Microsoft Publisher turned up to 11, and it’s fast!

You can take a look at one of my stories on the northern lights here and one of Terry White’s stories on Iceland here

Have a closer look at the Adobe Spark range and I think, as a photographer, you’ll be pleasantly surprised at what it can do for you. 

Much love

Dave

I’ve got the images, stories, behind-the-scenes shots, and even some short videos from my trip out the USS Harry S. Truman last week. Lots of fun stuff to share, and I laid out the images using Adobe Spark Page (about the best way to share your photography work online):

Here’s the link if you’ve got a sec: https://spark.adobe.com/page/D9QsBX3AikF9k/

OK, I’m back to work this week — I’ve got a tour to get ready for (My “Ultimate Photography Crash Course” full-day seminar, kicking off next month in Indianapolis and then Minneapolis. Come on out and spend the day with me.

Have a kick-butt week everybody!

-Scott

Lt. Blaine Reeher Dixon prior to launching off the deck of the Truman in a FA/18 Hornet

It’s been six years since my last opportunity to fly out to a carrier for a few days, and I was so thrilled to get that chance again. I don’t know if you remember the story of my original trip (here’s the link), but I was so overwhelmed the first day out on the flight deck, that I basically blew the shoot. I took the same shot over and over again jets taking off again and again, and when I looked at the images later, I realized I was shooting the wrong thing. Ever since then I’d be hoping for an opportunity to try again, and thanks to my buddy Ed Buice, I finally got the chance.

I didn’t have any internet or cell coverage since Tuesday afternoon, and it was a blessing and a curse (you really learn fast how much you rely on your phone for simple things like “What time is sunset” and “Who was the actor in that movie?” all day long). I liked being unplugged less than I thought, but it was still a nice break (and one I’m glad that’s over).

Anyway, as I write this I’m on my connecting flight home from Atlanta and it’s 9:26 pm, so I’m not going to have any photos to share until Monday, where I’m planning to do an Adobe Spark Page post of the trip. Lots of stories to share, photos, behind-the-scenes stuff. Hoping for Monday. Now, this was a different carrier than I had been on before — my last trip had been out to the USS George H. W. Bush.

One thing was exactly the same, though…

That one thing that was exactly the same was my admiration for the men and women of our US Navy. I wish every American could get the opportunity to spend a few days on a Navy ship. What an outstanding crew – so professional, dedicated, polite, friendly, hard-working, and the sence of pride they have for what they doing, and how they do it, is just something to see for yourself. Seeing how they handle the jets and helos on the flight deck is just…well, it’s a master class on precision and teamwork, but it extends through the entire crew. I’m so grateful for their service and sacrifice, and the sacrifice of their families.

I’m also so thankful to my buddy Ed Buice (you are the man!), and my new buddy Todd “Brian” Beveridge, NCIS Special Agent Afloat Dan Chaney, and all the folks at NCIS who helped make my trip out to a carrier not only possible but an awful lot of fun.

That’s pretty much all I have for today, except that I did take an hour on my first flight today to watch the final episode of Season 7 of “Game of Thrones.” I binge-watched all seven seasons in the past few months while traveling on planes, and I believe it’s just about the best show on TV. Now I’m all caught up and ready for the final season. I hope it ends better than “Lost.” ;-)

Have a great weekend everybody! Anchor’s away!

-Scott

P.S. Don’t forget to book your hotel rooms at the Hyatt Regency in Orlando for the Photoshop World Conference at the end of next month. We’re almost sold out of rooms there. Here’s the link to the travel page.

It’s #TravelTuesday right here on Scott’s blog, and that means that I, Dave Williams, am here!

It has been a full-on week with lots of prep and planning for a couple of upcoming missions for me. I’ve been working through files from my most recent trip to Norway, and I’m lining up ideas for a little trip to Dorset this weekend for my birthday. It’s all go here, and to top it all off, I’m formulating ideas for an awesome project that has already started rolling: The Diary of the Traveling Platypod, which sees a Platypod Ultra travel the world to help create amazing images (#TravelingUltra)! Larry, the creator of Platypod, sent it to Gilmar Smith to begin its journey, and now I have it! You can sign up here if you want to host the Ultra on its global journey.

But, let’s get back on track and take a look at a cool Adobe Camera Raw trick that can help you create an HDR look from a single file.

HDR (High Dynamic Range) is a look that has come in and out of fashion, but the concept behind it remains very useful. With this trick, you can take a single exposure, so long as it isn’t overly clipped either way, and create an HDR look from it by ignoring every piece of advice I’ve ever given you and going to 100 on a few sliders! Watch this: –

Here’s a fairly bland shot of a Norwegian road in Senja, turning a corner along the edge of a fjord, with the rugged mountainscape background (mountainscape—definitely a real word).

You can see it’s pretty “regular” looking—more of a snapshot than a creative photograph. By opening this RAW file in Camera Raw and maxing out some sliders, we can really bring it to life.

If we first consider what HDR processing involves, we can start by replicating it. We’ll do this by bringing in the darkest elements of the brightest exposure and the brightest elements of the darkest exposure by setting the Highlights slider to –100 and the Shadows slider to +100. We can give some “punch” to the image by also setting the Contrast slider to +100 and the Clarity slider to +100, increasing the contrast across the entire dynamic range of the image.

Once this is done, we’ll likely end up with something a little bit dodgy looking, but stick with me. The last little tweak is the Exposure slider. We’ll just move this slightly in order to reduce that overly dramatic hit. In this image, I’ve moved it to 0.60, and it has done just the trick.

We now have that HDR look from a single exposure, and it was incredibly easy!

Catch you all next week and, in the meantime, please do keep in touch over at @CaptureWithDave on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

Much Love

Dave

I am so excited — this is the first thing I’ve ever invented (with lots of help from my friends at Westcott) — it’s a lighting tool for educators and students, and its sole purpose is to teach people lighting before they go and buy lighting. Check out the video below to see what it’s all about (and how the idea came about).

So, now that you’ve seen the video, you know — it’s about experimenting, learning, and seeing “the light.” That way, when you do buy a flash or a studio strobe or continuous light, the frustration, the futzing, and the whole guessing game is over because you’ll have a plan — you’ll know what you’re trying to achieve, what light does, when to use hard light, diffused light, what gobos do, what fresnels do, the color differences between tungsten and daylight. You’ll know all this because the light comes with a full training class on light, and how to use The Learning Light, in your classroom, or with other students, or for just you as you’re learning.

It’s got direct hard light, soft diffused light, a Fresnel spotlight, its own set of gobos, and a carrying case it all fits perfectly inside. It’s LED powered so it doesn’t get hot to the touch.

We released a full training class on it to KelbyOne members this week, but if you buy the light, you get full access to the class as part of the lighting package.

It’s available today

The light, with the gobos and the training class, is just $89.90 and you can get it direct from the folks at Westcott (here’s the link), and B&H Photo will be carrying them any day now, too.

As an educator myself, you can probably imagine how exciting it is to have a tool like this for other educators and students, and I’m so grateful to my friends at Westcott: Eric Eggley (who came up with so many great ideas for The Learning Light, and took my initial idea and took it much farther than I’d ever hoped), and to Brandon Heiss, whose vision and commitment to helping teachers is why there is a Learning Light today at all.

I’m super-psyched! (can ya tell)? ;-)

One last thing, and it’s something I think is really important (and you’ll hear me talk about this aspect a lot). This is not lighting. It’s a learning tool. It’s the light you buy before you buy real lighting. It’s for experimenting with shadows, and light, and for learning lighting before you fully invest it in. I truly hope you’ll find it helpful (and I think you’ll find it’s a lot of fun), and thanks for taking the time to let me share this all with you (and tell your teacher friends about it, if you would). :)

Have a great weekend, everybody!

-Scott

P.S. Did I mention I invented a light for educators? Whoo hoo!!! I’m super-psyched!

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