Category Archives Photography

OK, it may be more than a few, but it includes lots of behind-the-scenes shots (often including camera settings), and shots from my travel workshop there, and from my trip to Provence to shoot the Lavender fields, and the story behind it all.

If you’ve got a minute and want to start off your Monday in a “French crepe with Bananas and Nutella” kinda way, I hope you’ll give it a quick look. Here’s the link:

https://spark.adobe.com/page/iu1Zv6auT0fu5/

Thanks, everybody, and here’s wishing you bakery baguette kind of morning.

Merci,

-Scott

I was hoping to share the shots and stories from my Paris trip today, but with catching up at work and all, I couldn’t get it done in time, but I did want to share something I’m particularly excited about. Remember that trip I took out to the aircraft carrier, the USS Harry S. Truman (link)? The images and story from that trip are featured in a 12-page article in the June issue of the International Society of Aviation Photography’s (ISAP) official magazine (ISnAP), and I am psyched!

Here’s a look at the spreads from the page.

If you want to see more images from the trip (or at least larger ones than shown here), you can check out Adobe Spark page on the trip.

Many thanks to ISnAP for including me in their awesome magazine. Very honored indeed.

Have a great weekend everybody!

-Scott

P.S. Chicago area photographers — I’m heading up there next month with my new full-day seminar, “The Ultimate Photography Crash Course.” Details and tickets right here.

Hi all! It’s #TravelTuesday here on Scott Kelby’s blog and that means I’m here to lay down something from the world of Photoshop, photography, travel, and life. Today is no exception! I’m Dave Williams—let me tell you a sad story.

There’s a shot I want to get so bad. It’s here in the UK and it’s dangerous! I want to get out on the water of the English Channel to shoot the Beachy Head Lighthouse from the sea. The problem, however, is that where there’s a lighthouse, there tends to be a reason! The lighthouse is accessible from land about 1.5 miles west or 2 miles east because of the high cliffs behind it. The only way is to launch from one of these two points and going via the water.

The shot will look amazing. I want to get a wide shot with the stereotypical red and white lighthouse centre-frame and have the enormous white cliffs taper off in either direction, and I want it at sunrise. I’ve tried to get this shot three times and failed. Here’s what happened: –

The first time I had an inflatable kayak. I drove through the night (it’s a 170-miles round trip) to arrive in time for sunrise. I was there on time and the twilight gave me the blue hour, so I hauled my gear—the kayak, life vest, paddle, waterproof bag with camera and drone—down a dead-steep hill to the cliffs and then down the cracks and ledges in the limestone, and was at the water’s edge about 15 minutes before dawn. The water was rough and I walked along the tide line trying to find a safe spot. The water was just too rough, though, for an inflatable kayak and there was no safe place to launch, so I had to turn myself back around and carry everything back up that insanely steep hill, back to the car, and try again another day. My legs were burning from lactic acid with all that weight on such a steep hill, and it was all for nothing.

The next time I quit halfway there, the weather report changed and it wasn’t even worth going. That’s two goes, and a couple of days ago was attempt number three. I left home before 1:00 a.m. to make it down to the coast. First light was forecast at 4:00 a.m. and sunrise at 4:46, so I had to get there with plenty of time to get in position. The first challenge I had was, with this attempt being at the other location, I needed to carry the rigid kayak I’d got down the stairs to the stone beach I’d launch from. It wasn’t light!

The next challenge was the launch. All the planning I’d put in by checking weather, wind, tides etc., was telling me there’d be a high neap tide with low wind, which tends to suggest the waves will be minimal. What I actually faced was something altogether different: –

The waves were enormous, but I pushed on. First, I put the kayak at the water’s edge and climbed in with my waterproof bag between my legs. But, before I could get the spray deck attached, the water swept over me and flooded me out. Unperturbed by this setback (as is my nature), I pulled the kayak back, turned it over to empty it out, and tried again. The second launch wasn’t all that much better though, turning me sideways and showing me the sheer power of the water. I was done in again by the sea and gathered everything back together to try again. Third time’s a charm, right? Unfortunately not. This time I’d managed to get settled and get the spray deck attached in time for the first big wave to come in and hit me, but the power of the sea was still just too much and I was fully inverted. I had to give up.

When I said this shot was dangerous, I meant life-threateningly so. I was cold and drenched through every layer—the sea had beaten me and I still don’t have the shot! Shame too because the sunrise was pretty cool that day.

But here’s the thing: if you have a target in your sights, don’t give up on it. I’ll be back to get that shot! (By the way, if anybody reading this has a boat in Eastbourne, please feel free to get in touch!) I’m not giving up on this shot—I’ll get it one way or another. It’s not worth giving up on something good just because it’s a bit difficult.

Don’t give up just because things are hard. I have a tattoo on my left arm which says “aut viam inveniam aut faciam” which is Latin and means either find a way or make one. If you can’t stop thinking about it, don’t stop working for it, because some things that are worth having don’t come easy. You are so much stronger than you think. Someday you’ll look back on all the progress you made and be glad you didn’t quit. If you fall three times, stand up four, because winners aren’t people who don’t fail—they’re people who don’t quit.

Much love

Dave

I’m happy to announce that we are now accepting entries to have your own solo gallery showing at The Gallery at KelbyOne, in Tampa, Florida.

Our past winners have included an engineer on the long island Railroad, an Anesthesiologist, one worked for the police department. Our next winner could be you. If you’re thinking there’s no way you could win, that’s exactly what the previous winners said. The only way you don’t have a chance is if you don’t enter.

Here’s a quick one-minute video with some details:

Here’s how to enter: 

  1. Here’s where you submit a link to your portfolio, or Facebook album, or Flickr page, or online gallery – (we’re looking for a body of work – around 20 images) Note: this competition is only open to KelbyOne Pro members.
  2. From the submissions, we will choose a single winner. It could be you. If it is, we’ll fly you and a guest (from anywhere in the world) to the gallery in Tampa, Florida for a solo gallery showcasing your work, where we’ll feature approximately 18 of your images, beautifully printed and displayed by Bay Photo Lab using their amazing Xpozer system.
  3. The evening of the opening, you will welcome the crowd to a wine and cheese reception held in your honor that evening in the gallery where they can see your work, and get a chance to chat with you in person.
  4. Following the reception, we’ll move to our theater for an interview with you about your work, your life, your inspirations, and well…you. It will be streamed live around the world (along with behind-the-scenes images of the opening, and photos of your work).
  5. When it’s all over, you will receive all the prints from the exhibition (courtesy of Bay Photo Lab), and one of your images will be added our permanent collection, so future visitors can get see one of your winning gallery images.
  6. The deadline for submissions is: May 29, 2019, at 11:59 PM EDT.

Have questions?
Here’s the link to an earlier post with a detailed Q&A on how this all works.

One more thing…
We’ll wrap up with some photos from earlier gallery contest winner’s gallery openings:

Hope we’ll be welcoming you to your own gallery show very soon. Good luck everybody!

Have a great weekend!

-Scott

P.S. Next Thursday the East Coast Photoshop World conference kicks off in Orlando. Want to go? It’s not too late. photoshopworld.com

Happy #TravelTuesday everybody! It’s me, Dave Williams, taking over for the day as I do every Tuesday here on Scott Kelby’s blog. Let’s be honest, Scott deserves a break with Photoshop World East coming up soon, and I’m pretty excited to get over there and hope to see some of you!

Let’s start by addressing a little myth that’s circulating social media right now, and that’s the myth that Adobe has scrapped their £/$/9.99 Photography Plan. The answer is: – they haven’t! Go take a look at Adobe’s subscription plans if you don’t believe me, and if you’re quick, you’ll catch a flash sale they have, too.

Okay, onto the main event! Today, I want to address something rather important in photography. Can a photographer be “good” because they have good gear? Well, my immediate answer to that question on absolute face value is “no.” I think it’s much more important to work on your eye first, and here’s why: –

The most important thing a photographer can do is understand why. Whatever gear you’re using, if you’re just starting out or an old hand to the game, the most important thing really is to understand why. Why does a certain lens perform in a certain way? Why does a certain camera’s sensor give a particular look to the colour? Why does composition lend itself to conveying a particular message? Why does f/16 generally work in bright sunlight? Why does the exposure triangle make sense? Why does light soften as the source and subject get closer? 

If you want to be a better photographer, you must understand why. The belief that a new camera makes you better, for example, is not true unless you understand why. Understanding why you want that new camera is crucial because if you don’t, you don’t know if it’s the right one. There’s the old adage, if you’re new to photography, that a pro photographer can do better with any camera than a rookie can do with a top of the range prosumer camera, and it’s true. You know why? It’s because the pro knows why. Having spent the time to understand not only what happens when they press the shutter, adjust the light, set the aperture, etc., the pro knows why these things happen. We all want to improve ourselves and our photography—it’s our human nature—but often the problem is that we can be mistaken that better gear makes us better photographers. It’s certainly true that the bokeh on a shiny new f/1.4 lens can be phenomenal, but without a good understanding of light and composition that can all be wasted. Perhaps, if you’re looking to spend money to improve your photography, consider spending it on training or on gaining experience and you’re on the fast track to understanding the answer to that all-important question: why?

When I started out in photography I thought I needed shiny new toys, loads of different lenses, and tons of megapixels. I quickly learned that what I, in fact, needed was answers and no amount of money spent on gear would substitute training and experience. The most important thing a photographer can do is understand why. Know why a camera or a piece of kit does what it does, and you’ll know which one best suits your purpose.

I hope that means something and makes a difference to your progression, no matter what stage you’re at. There is one exception, however: – buy a Platypod. ;)

I’m off to Paris today, so I wish you all a great #TravelTuesday and you can follow along with me at @capturewithdave if you like. I’d love to meet you in the comments!

Much love

Dave

When I was in Minneapolis for my new seminar and I had the day off before my seminar, so I went shooting with my buddy Jay Grammond who lives up there. I’m always on the lookout for classic old interiors and he came up with some really great ones.

We got to four locations in all (including some real gems), and I put together an Adobe Spark page with the story, behind the scenes shots, camera settings, and my favorite shots from the day of shooting in the Twin Cities.

>> Here’s the link if you’ve got a sec. Hope you’ll check ’em out.

Just 10-days to the East Coast Photoshop World Conference

It’s not too late to come and join us in Orlando. If you can’t make Orlando this month, we’re doing a West Coast Photoshop World Conference in Las Vegas at the Mirage Resort & Casino on August 21-23, 2019 and it’s going to be epic. Tickets and info on both conferences at photoshopworld.com

Here’s to a super awesome week. :)

-Scott

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