Category Archives Photography

We had one heck of a great discussion on last Wednesday’s live episode of “The Grid.” It started with a discussion about whether or not taking a photo of someone else’s art (in our discussion, a sculpture in downtown Chicago), make it suddenly “your art” or is it just a picture of someone else’s art?

Photographer and photography app wizard Troy Plota joined us (he was awesome), and we went down into the rabbit hole in a big way, and it was such a great episode I wanted to share it with you here today.

Today’s the Deadline for Entering The Worldwide Photo Walk Contest

If you participated in the Worldwide Photo Walk, today is the deadline to enter your best image taken during the official walk into the photo contest. Make sure you head over to the site; upload your image, and your local leader will be announcing the winner for your walk very soon.

One week from today I’m doing my new full-day seminar in Richmond

…and this Thursday I’m in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area, so come on out and spend the day with me. We already have hundreds of photographers signed up, so don’t be the only one to miss out. Also, coming to Atlanta next month. Looking forward to seeing everybody. Tickets and info here.

Behind-the-scenes shot from my workshop in Guilin, China.

Thanks for checking out my China pics!

Thanks so much to everybody who checked out my images here on Friday from my workshop trip to China with Rick Sammon. Thanks for all the very kind comments — it really was an incredible experience, and I was tickled to get to share it with you. If you didn’t have a chance to check them out, here’s the link if you’ve got a sec.

Also, if you’re a KelbyOne Pro member, I did a members-only Webcast about the trip, including lots of tips about shooting in rural locales like this. Here’s the link if you want give it a look – we got lots of great comments.

That’s it for this Monday. Don’t forget to check out today’s tip over at LightroomKillerTips.com (and tomorrow I have my another “Lightroom in 60-seconds” video tip over there). Hope you can check ’em out.

Here’s wishing you awesome, fun-filled, great weather week!

-Scott

Mornin’, gang, and happy Friday! I finally got some of my favorite shots together from my recent workshop trip to rural China, and I shared the final images, with lots of behind-the-scenes shots and videos, and the stories behind it all.

Here’s the link if you’ve got a minute. I hope you can give them a look.

TIP: At the end of the post, I shared how I set up my three Custom Modes on my camera. Most cameras these days have the ability to set up your own custom modes, and man do they make your life easier! Hope you find those helpful.

Heads up: if you participated in the Worldwide Photo Walk last week, Monday is the deadline to enter the photo contest

The contest prizes this year are pretty amazing (including a Canon EOS RP Mirrorless Camera with a 24-105mm lens, and the Adobe Creative Suite, and a B&H Gift Card, a whole bunch more!). Even the finalist prizes are crazy good, so make sure you enter your best shot from the walk. Hey, ya never know, right?

Here’s wishing you all a great Friday, a rockin’ weekend (#rolltide), and hopefully you’ll stop back by on Monday to see what’s going on. :)

-Scott

P.S. I shared a technique today over at LightroomKillerTips.com on how to edit in Lightroom Classic on your laptop when you’re traveling, and then how to merge all that you did; the images, sorting, editing — the works, with your main computer back home. Here’s the link if that sounds like something that might interest you.

#TravelTuesday has come round again, and I’m here on ScottKelby.com. I’m Dave Williams and this week, I want to start by saying, “well done” to all the walk leaders of events around the globe as part of Scott Kelby’s Worldwide Photo Walk®! Great work, team! To everyone who attended a walk, I hope you had a fantastic time and made some great, new friends! Don’t forget to enter the contests as there are some top-notch prizes on offer across all the categories!

The thing I want to address in today’s post is about photography on social media. Specifically, how to deal with a problem I recently encountered. You know those interactive panoramas on Facebook? Well, there’s a piece of code that figures out whether your image is suitable by checking whether or not it’s a panorama when you upload. It checks the height vs width ratio of your image as one factor, but this isn’t the deciding factor as to whether your image is posted as an interactive panorama or a 360° photo. I learned this to my frustration recently with this post.

When I was in Iceland last week I saw the most spectacular show Mother Nature has to offer—the Northern Lights were filling the entire sky, all night long, owing to a geomagnetic storm. I set up my tripod on the road at the top of a mountain pass in north-east Iceland, far away from civilisation, and shot 16 exposures over-lapped, covering an entire circle around my position. I used Adobe Photoshop to stitch the exposures together as a panorama when I got home, using Merge to Panorama.

I shot the images using my Nikon Z6 (remember this for a second). When I went to upload the panorama to Facebook, it was looking just like this: –

I wanted the image to be an interactive panorama, but the code in Facebook wasn’t picking up that it was a panorama for some reason, and I couldn’t work out why. I tried uploading from my computer and from my phone, but it just wasn’t making a difference.

I was reading about how Facebook decides whether a photo is a panorama, and whether it’s solely the aspect ratio. As I said already, it turned out this wasn’t the only deciding factor. The camera used to take a panorama is also a factor, so I had to manipulate Facebook and trick it into making my panorama one of those cool, interactive ones, just like I wanted. Here’s how: –

Facebook recognises images of a certain aspect ratio taken on a phone as being an interactive panorama, or a 360° photo, however, we know my image was shot on the Nikon Z6, not on a phone. I had to make Facebook think it was a phone shot, but how? Well, it’s quite simple: If you use an EXIF editor, you can change all manner of details about an image. One such thing is the make and model of camera used to take the shot. By simply uploading the image at theXifer.net and changing the EXIF data to show that the image was taken on an Apple iPhone, rather than a Nikon Z6, this was sufficient for Facebook to accept the uploaded file as a 360° photo, and allowed my social media followers to get a sense of what I was seeing at 2 a.m. on the top of a mountain pass in Iceland. Simple!

I’ll be sharing a lot more detailed info on the Northern Lights really soon, so stay tuned if you want to know more.

Much love

Dave

Hi, gang — I’m back from 10-days in China for my photography workshop there with my dear friend and colleague Rick Sammon. I took Canon’s new made-for-mirrorless 24-240mm f/4-f/6.3 RF-Mount do-it-all lens with me as my main body, and after shooting thousands of images with it, here’s my unfiltered field report.

Some pretty shocking things about this news lens (as you’ll see in the video below), and I included some important tips that are absolutely critical for anybody who owns this lens, or is considering picking one up. It’s all here, the good, the bad, and the ugly. Give it a look:

Hope you found that helpful. Here’s a link to the lens on B&H Photo for more details, specs, or to order one.

One week until the Worldwide Photo Walk

The big event is one week from tomorrow (Sat., Oct 5th), in 1,000 cities all around the world, but If you haven’t signed up to join a walk near you, no worries — there’s still time. Head over to WorldwidePhotoWalk.com; search for a city near you; join your local walk (it’s free) and get in on all the fun and contest prizes.

Hope everybody has a great weekend. See ya back here next week!

-Scott

P.S. Thanks to all the photographers who came out to my seminar in Nashville on Wednesday – appreciate the great turnout and the gracious hospitality. Tennessee people are just the best! Next stop, Dallas and Richmond in October. Hope you can make it for the day. Tickets here. :)

With the recent launch of the iPhone 11 and an abundance of other great camera phones on the market, combined with the age-old saying that there’s no better camera than the one you have in your pocket, this week I’m going to lay down some phone photography tips. 

I’m Dave Williams, and every week I’m here on ScottKelby.com for #TravelTuesday—let’s do this!

Firstly, our phone is often the closest camera to hand when a moment arises out of nowhere that we want to put into pixels, and to this end, it can be a great benefit to be able to launch the camera app as quickly as possible. Get yourself familiar with the quickest way to launch your camera app with any shortcuts your phone offers, and if you enjoy using the camera built into Lightroom Mobile there’s an easy way access it through the iOS notification centre. 

Next up, remember that everything we know about photography still applies when we use our phones. Rules of composition, selective focussing, burst shooting, and bracketing for HDR exposures can all be applied, and in fact, should be applied to give us the best results and the best mobile photos possible. Just like quickly launching our camera app, it’s important to become acquainted with the methods to apply these techniques to our photography. There are compositional overlays, we can adjust for focus and exposure, we can apply HDR, and we can shoot burst mode. Everything we know still applies, so we should make the most of what our smartphones offer us for the absolute best photos. 

After we’ve captured the scene, we have a whole wealth of post-processing apps available to us. If you’re an Adobe Creative Cloud member, there’s Lightroom Mobile, and other apps are available which also deliver top-quality results, such as Snapseed, VSCO, LensDistortion, and of course, the editing features native to our phones operating systems. For example, as well as making final adjustments to our images, if we’re iPhone users, we can select a photo from our camera roll, swipe up, and then if we shot a Live Photo we can process our photo sequence into a long exposure—perfect for when we’d shoot waterfalls!

Take the time to learn your way around your camera phone and you’ll be surprised at what you can do with it!

I’ll be posting shots from my phone to my Instagram Story starting on Friday when I arrive in Iceland, so make sure you follow along right here

Much love

Dave


Anyway, I finally got them together and I hope you’ll have a sec to check them out. Here’s the link. https://spark.adobe.com/page/kY4DWLrcs928p/

It’s taken me a few weeks to get these together — I was on a critical book deadline, but the book is done, and there’s time for fun (that would make such a great start for a “book author’s rap song”).

We also wound up in Belfast, Ireland and Iceland for day as well, so I threw a few of those shots in as well.

Have you signed up to join your local Photo Walk yet?

Now’s the time! We have approved nearly 900 cities so far around the world to host photo walks as part of my 12th Annual Worldwide Photo Walk on Saturday, October 5, 2019. Click here to go to the official site and see if there’s a walk organized near you. If not, maybe you should be the one to lead one? Click the same link for details on leading a walk.

This is going to be a great day, and an awesome week!

Let’s make the most of it. Hope yours is a great one!

-Scott

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