Category Archives Photoshop

Hello, internets! It’s #TravelTuesday again, so I’m here to impart some kind of wisdom onto you, and today it’s all about tweaking colour with Camera Raw’s Hue sliders. But first!

I’m writing this post from a Starbucks just outside of the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park in Scotland, fresh from an overnight stop before I head farther north towards the Isle of Skye. I’m shooting a couple of little projects involving drone photography and Platypod tripods. You can keep up with what I’m doing on this trip by following me on social media (look for @capturewithdave) and by watching the @kelbyonepics Instagram story!

On with the blog!

The HSL  (Hue/Saturation/Luminance) Adjustments panel in Adobe Camera Raw is very useful, but perhaps most confusing are the Hue options. While the Saturation and Luminance sliders enhance the colours, the Hue sliders actually change them. There are some pretty powerful things you can do with the Hue sliders—you can even change the seasons in post if you tweak the colours the right way.

What’s actually happening when you adjust a colour slider in the Hue tab is that you’re moving its position on a colour wheel. In terms of its practical application, I’ll use the Hue sliders to adjust this photo and make the grass greener, whilst maintaining the other colours.

 

 

In this shot, the tones up in the sky are beautiful—the sun lowering in the sky (it’s 9pm) is casting a fabulous orange glow—but I feel like the grass should be just a little bit greener. We can take advantage of the Hue sliders and make this adjustment easily right in Camera Raw.

 

 

Using the Hue sliders to shift the colours within sections of the colour wheel, if we move the Yellows slider (the colour of the grass in this case) towards the green end, and compensate with the Oranges and Greens sliders to maintain the actual green and retain that orange in the sky by moving those sliders away from the yellow ends, we’ve easily achieved our goal! It’s as easy as that!

 

 

 

That grass is now greener, which to me is more realistic and more pleasing, and all it took was an understanding of what’s going on with the Hue tab’s sliders.

Much love

Dave

This trick, in particular, is for that nasty noise you can sometimes get in long exposure images — especially if you have to brighten the image, but it can work in all kinds of instances.

Now, before I show you this trick, I do want you to know that I normally don’t mess with trying to fix noise in my images. It has to be really, really, really bad for me to even try to deal with noise, because (1) noise reduction techniques and plug-ins simply blur your image to hide the noise, so you’re trading one bad thing for another, and (2) only other photographers even notice noise — the public is pretty much immune to it, but in the case you’re going to see below, I would (and did in the final image I posted on Instagram), fix the noise, but I didn’t use a noise reduction scheme, which is what makes the trick so helpful. Check it out:

Hope you found that helpful (and I hope you listened all the way to the end). :-)

 17-days to the Photoshop World 2018 Conference
It’s not too late – you can still come and join us for three days of Photoshop, Lightroom, Design, and photography training from the best instructor roster ever assembled. May 31-June 2nd in Orlando, Florida. Details, travel info, and tickets at http://photoshopworld.com

Have a great Monday everybody – I’m on my way to Salt Lake City for my seminar there tomorrow. Hope I see you there!

Best,

-Scott

 

Hey there! It’s me again, Dave Williams, which means it’s my favourite day of the week – #TravelTuesday – and that means I’m here, in your face, at Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider!

Now, if you were following along, you know that I jumped on my Triumph and spent nine days riding from London to the Atlantic Highway in Norway – 3,100+ miles if you’re asking. And guess what…I’m back! I’m still trawling through hours of footage to make a cool video to show you all, so keep an eye on my Facebook page to see when that lands. But, for today, I’ve seen inspiration in the amazing sunny weather we’re having here in London and I want to share with you this amazing little trick!

So, you know when you shoot into the sun and you get that cool bright spot and a little lens flare? Well, that’s what we’ll create here, so go ahead and choose a suitable shot or download mine right here. (Use my shot for the tutorial, use it to show us how you get on with the tutorial, but sell it and I’ll find you!) Let’s go!

First up, the prep: Open the shot into Adobe Photoshop and duplicate the layer with CMD + J (Windows CTRL + J), so we work non-destructively, then press D, then X to set your Foreground colour to white.

 

 

Down at the bottom of the Layers panel, click on the Create New Fill or Adjustment Layer icon and then choose Gradient from the pop-up menu.

 

 

In the Gradient Fill dialogue, set the Style to Radial. When that’s done, you can go ahead and move the radial gradient in the image, behind the dialogue, by clicking-and-dragging it, setting it up at the spot you want it. Next up, click on the Gradient thumbnail and a new dialogue will pop up.

 

 

What we’ll do here in the Gradient Editor is create a custom gradient just like I’ve done above. It’s tricky to explain in writing, so focus! To do this, first, select the left colour stop (the square at the bottom left of the colour ramp), then click on the Color swatch and, in the Color Picker, set it to a yellow that’s almost white. Now, select the right colour stop and set its colour to a midtone gray.

So far so good. We’ve set the centre point to a very bright colour to emulate the sun and set the outer edges to a gray, which will fade out. Now, select the centre colour stop (if you don’t have one, just click below the centre of the colour ramp and one will appear). Set this one to a very light orange, then slide that colour stop towards the lower end of the colour ramp. We’ll create two more colour stops to add some realism to what’s becoming our sun glare. We create them by clicking below the ramp, and when we select the colours, we stick with slightly different tones of yellow or orange. The result we need to achieve is that the spectrum of the gradient is very bright at the centre, the left, then changes to a darker and more orange colour for the first third, then fades to more of a yellow or even peach colour throughout the next third, and fading towards the right. Make sense? Thought so!

 

 

When we’re happy with the custom gradient we’ve made, hit OK and we’ll be taken back to the Gradient Fill dialogue. Here, we can change the Angle to suit the position within our image, and we can make it larger or smaller with the Scale adjustment. I’ve pushed mine to 120% here. When you’re happy, hit OK.

 

 

Now, near the top of the Layers panel, change the blend mode to Hard Light.

So, we’ve got the sun, and the glow, but we’re missing something. We can step this up now by adding a lens flare, so let’s go ahead and do that, too!

Click on Layer 1 in the Layers panel, and then select Filter>Render>Lens Flare.

 

 

I find that the most effective Lens Type here is the 50-300mm Zoom, so that’s what I’ve used but you can choose whichever suits your image. In the preview box, click on the centre of the sun, the gradient filter, and it will become much brighter and throw the lens flare across the image. From here, we’re almost finished; we just need to adjust the Brightness to suit the image. I’ve set mine at 125%, but set yours wherever it works and hit OK.

 

 

And, we’re done! We’ve added a very dramatic, warm, and convincing glow of the sun to our image. I hope you like it! Show me how you get on by tagging @capturewithdave when you upload to Twitter or Instagram, and until next week…..

 

Much love

Dave

 

PS – Here’s a top secret Platypod tip. Don’t tell anyone!

Happy Friday, everybody. I have a little video I made for you today, to talk about a feature Adobe added not long along to Photoshop CC, but I talk to people all the time who have no idea it’s there, and so, of course, they’re not using it. In fact, I can’t find hardly anyone using it, but it’s so awesome I use it all the time, and I think you’ll love it, too.

Check out the video below (it has other cool tips in the video as well).

Hope you find that helpful.

If you’re into Lightroom, and you live in Hartford, I’ll see ya Monday!
Well, I hope you’re one of the coupla-hundred photographers already signed up for my full day of Lightroom training there on Monday. If not you’re not too late. Next stop after that, Salt Lake City in a week or so. You can get tickets for either one right here.

I’ll be teaching Lightroom for three days in Orlando at the end of this month
It’s the biggest Lightroom training event the world, and it’s just a few weeks away, but it’s not too late – you can still sign up and be there to learn more about Lightroom in three-day than you have in three years. It’s called the Photoshop World Conference, and an entire training track is dedicated to Lightroom. Details and tickets here. 

Have a rockin’ weekend, everybody. See a bunch of you Monday in Hartford! :)

Best,

-Scott

Hey hey! Welcome to #TravelTuesday, right here on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider. I’m Dave Williams, I’m here every Tuesday, and today I’m coming at you with a quick-fire Photoshop tip on how to sharpen without hitting that Sharpen button!

This technique works across the board, from landscapes to portraits, and can be used to make your images more visually impactive. It’s a clever little technique, which improves contrast across the entire range of tones, particularly within the smaller detailed elements (such as hair in a portrait or plants in a landscape), and it enhances the textures and, of course, the sharpness of the picture.

The reason this technique should be considered in many cases, rather than the Sharpen filter, is because the Sharpen algorithm samples pixels and looks for what it considers an edge, and then it applies some contrast to those edge pixels. This technique uses a different method of contrast-specific blend modes to quickly and easily enhance detail in your shot by using the actual edges, rather than guessing what’s an edge. Here’s how it’s done:

Open your image and duplicate the layer with CMD + J (Windows: CTRL + J).

Next, apply the High Pass filter (found under the Filter menu, under Other) by selecting a Radius value that gives you a clear contour on edge elements in your shot—usually between 1 and 6 px.

Now, we need to set the blend mode to Overlay using the pop-up menu near the top left of the Layers panel.

That’s it! I told you it was easy! The differences between using the Sharpen filter and using this technique give you, in most cases, a fantastic result, bringing your image to life!

Much love

Dave

Here are seven of my favorite Photoshop keyboard shortcuts — ones I use every day in my work and I hope you find them useful in yours. Here goes:


Press Shift-Command-E (PC: Shift-Ctrl-E) to merge all your visible layers together — it’s like a shortcut for flattening (well, it is if you don’t have any layers turned off and hidden anyway).

Press ‘d’ then ‘x’ to set your Foreground color to white. Press “x” again to change it to black.

If you copy and paste (or drag) an image from one document to another and it doesn’t fit on screen, but when you go to Free Transform you can’t reach the Transform handles, press Command-0 [zero] (PC: Ctrl-0] and the window will resize  just enough so you can reach all the handles.

Press the Tab key to hide all your open panels — getting everything out of the way but your image.

Press the Left-bracket key to jump to the next smallest brush preset size; press the right-bracket key to jump up to the next largest. Note: the bracket keys are to the right of the letter P on your keyboard (provided you’re using an English language keyboard).

If you click with the eyedropper took, of course, whatever color you click on becomes your new Foreground Color. However, if you click the Eyedropper anywhere in your document and keep the mouse button held down, you can actually move outside of Photoshop’s window and steal a color from anywhere — from your desktop; from other applications, you name it.

This is more of a shortcut than a keyboard shortcut, but to unlock the Background layer, just click the lock icon beside to the right of the name Background Layer, and it’s unlocked.

Hope you found that helpful. 🙂

You keep sayin’…
…that one of these days you’re going to go to the Photoshop World Conference. Why not this year? If you register now you can save $100 with the Early Bird discount, plus right now you can snag a hotel room right at the Hyatt Regency (our host hotel) at a special discount rate for attendees. Plus, airfares are cheap to Orlando now. Come on, say it with me — “This is the year. I’m going!” All the details are at PhotoshopWorld.com

One more thing…
I’ve got a handy tip for how Lightroom works with Layered Photoshop files today over on my daily Lightroom blog, LightroomKillerTips.com. Here’s the link if you’ve got a sec. 🙂

Have a great Monday, everybody!

Best,

-Scott

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