Category Archives Photoshop

Hey hey! Welcome to #TravelTuesday, right here on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider. I’m Dave Williams, I’m here every Tuesday, and today I’m coming at you with a quick-fire Photoshop tip on how to sharpen without hitting that Sharpen button!

This technique works across the board, from landscapes to portraits, and can be used to make your images more visually impactive. It’s a clever little technique, which improves contrast across the entire range of tones, particularly within the smaller detailed elements (such as hair in a portrait or plants in a landscape), and it enhances the textures and, of course, the sharpness of the picture.

The reason this technique should be considered in many cases, rather than the Sharpen filter, is because the Sharpen algorithm samples pixels and looks for what it considers an edge, and then it applies some contrast to those edge pixels. This technique uses a different method of contrast-specific blend modes to quickly and easily enhance detail in your shot by using the actual edges, rather than guessing what’s an edge. Here’s how it’s done:

Open your image and duplicate the layer with CMD + J (Windows: CTRL + J).

Next, apply the High Pass filter (found under the Filter menu, under Other) by selecting a Radius value that gives you a clear contour on edge elements in your shot—usually between 1 and 6 px.

Now, we need to set the blend mode to Overlay using the pop-up menu near the top left of the Layers panel.

That’s it! I told you it was easy! The differences between using the Sharpen filter and using this technique give you, in most cases, a fantastic result, bringing your image to life!

Much love

Dave

Here are seven of my favorite Photoshop keyboard shortcuts — ones I use every day in my work and I hope you find them useful in yours. Here goes:


Press Shift-Command-E (PC: Shift-Ctrl-E) to merge all your visible layers together — it’s like a shortcut for flattening (well, it is if you don’t have any layers turned off and hidden anyway).

Press ‘d’ then ‘x’ to set your Foreground color to white. Press “x” again to change it to black.

If you copy and paste (or drag) an image from one document to another and it doesn’t fit on screen, but when you go to Free Transform you can’t reach the Transform handles, press Command-0 [zero] (PC: Ctrl-0] and the window will resize  just enough so you can reach all the handles.

Press the Tab key to hide all your open panels — getting everything out of the way but your image.

Press the Left-bracket key to jump to the next smallest brush preset size; press the right-bracket key to jump up to the next largest. Note: the bracket keys are to the right of the letter P on your keyboard (provided you’re using an English language keyboard).

If you click with the eyedropper took, of course, whatever color you click on becomes your new Foreground Color. However, if you click the Eyedropper anywhere in your document and keep the mouse button held down, you can actually move outside of Photoshop’s window and steal a color from anywhere — from your desktop; from other applications, you name it.

This is more of a shortcut than a keyboard shortcut, but to unlock the Background layer, just click the lock icon beside to the right of the name Background Layer, and it’s unlocked.

Hope you found that helpful. 🙂

You keep sayin’…
…that one of these days you’re going to go to the Photoshop World Conference. Why not this year? If you register now you can save $100 with the Early Bird discount, plus right now you can snag a hotel room right at the Hyatt Regency (our host hotel) at a special discount rate for attendees. Plus, airfares are cheap to Orlando now. Come on, say it with me — “This is the year. I’m going!” All the details are at PhotoshopWorld.com

One more thing…
I’ve got a handy tip for how Lightroom works with Layered Photoshop files today over on my daily Lightroom blog, LightroomKillerTips.com. Here’s the link if you’ve got a sec. 🙂

Have a great Monday, everybody!

Best,

-Scott

So, last week I was working in Photoshop on a splash screen YouTube thumbnail for a Lightroom tutorial I recorded on renaming your photos in Lightroom. I did this for my other site, lightroomkillertips.com and I ran into a few problems along the way, but the fixes worked out so well, I knew I needed to share them on the blog – it’s 2-1/2 (or more) tips mostly for fixing distracting stuff in your photo using The Patch Tool and a great trick for extending your background seamlessly. There are a few extra handy tips in here as well. :)

I hope you found anywhere from 1 to 2-3/4 of those tips helpful. :)

Hey, photographers in Atlanta…
300+ of you are coming out to my seminar there on Monday – if you’re not…it’s not too late. Here’s the link. Hey, Milwaukee — I’m there on Wednesday, come on out. Columbus, I’m headed there next month. Hope you’ll join me. 

Have a great weekend everybody!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Our interview last week with British fine art photographer Ian Munro (The Gallery at KelbyOne competition winner) – he was so brilliant that we’re airing it again in its entirety TODAY. Great insights and amazing images – streaming on my FB page today at 4pm ET (here’s the link) – don’t miss it.

Happy Tuesday! For my post this week on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider for #TravelTuesday I’ll share with you a little trick to create a rainbow in Adobe Photoshop.

A real rainbow in a photo is a pretty cool thing to catch. Here’s a little selfie example: –

This was taken in a little valley at the neck leading into the Icelandic Westfjords in 2016. Now, if you look carefully and cast your eye aside from the beautiful English gent you’ll notice that there is actually a rainbow in that shot ;)

We’ll take this as a brief rainbow study and see what we need to try and simulate with our fake Photoshop rainbow. Note that the rainbow is pretty thin, extremely transparent, and not as saturated as we’d perhaps expect. We need to keep these observations in mind with our editing, let’s do it.

First off, crack open that shot. I’m using a moody skied drone shot from Old Harry Rocks, Dorset, England.

Let’s get straight into it and get that rainbow in there. Firstly, let’s create a new Layer with CMD + SHIFT + N (Windows: CTRL + SHFT + N)

Working in this new Layer, hit G to select the Gradient Tool. From the Toolbar up top open the Gradient Picker, click on the Gear icon, and select Special Effects and hit OK.

From the Gradient options, select the rainbow on the right named ‘Russell’s Rainbow.’

Now, change the Gradient Type to a Radial Gradient.

With this Tool, create a rainbow with a realistic arc. I find that a nice wide circle works best. When we do this we’ll see the entire circle, so concentrate on the portion which is in the sky and we’ll deal with the rest shortly.

In the Layers Menu, change the Blend Mode to Screen. Now select the Rainbow Layer with CMD + A (Windows: CTRL + A) and then hit T to use the Transform Tool to resize and reposition the rainbow. Here we need to think about what we figured out earlier – rainbows are thin!

And now bearing in mind the rest of what we learned, we need to desaturate the rainbow and make it more transparent. We can usually achieve this in one go by using the Layer Opacity Slider. I’ve taken mine right down to 25%.

And that leaves us just with the piece of rainbow that’s currently sitting in the sea! Rather than Photoshop in a pot of gold, let’s fade it out. Normally a rainbow won’t go right down to the ground, there’ll be a bit of a gap. Let’s do it that way in our image. Hit G to select the Gradient Tool again, and go back to the gear icon and select Reset Gradients and hit OK. Now check the black and white gradient named Foreground to Background. We will work on a Layer Mask so go ahead and create one from the Rainbow Layer. Now, making sure the Linear Gradient is selected in the Toolbar, make a line from the bottom to the top of the rainbow and note what happens. The most effective line in this case is from just below the horizon to just above it, which causes this to happen: –

As always with our post process it’s hard to decide when we’re finished, but at this point we are in fact done!

You can take this method and apply it to any image it fits, and I would love to see what you do with ti! As always, tag me on Instagram where I’m @capturewithdave so I can see your rainbows!

Take care,

Much love!

Dave

So my buddy Jim sends me a photo he took with his iPhone of the first Photoshop World Conference brochure ever to let me know the first one was back in 1999 and this is our 19th year of producing the Photoshop World Conference (whoo hoo!). Anyway, the photo he sent was pretty much a mess, and this was something I wanted to keep for posterity.

So, I used Photoshop (and some slick Lens tricks) to bring the brochure back to life and you see the whole process from Start to Finish, and as luck would have it, it’s a perfect segue for me to mention that the annual Photoshop World Conference is indeed less than 90-days away (in Orlando, Florida no less) and you should come. But first, the tutorial:

Thanks for sending me that crappy photo, Jim. 😂

Hey, since we’re all talking about the Photoshop World Conference and all that, check out this quick little trailer about it below:

OK, go sign up right now, while you can still snag at room right there at the Hyatt Regency Orlando (where all the stuff, instructor and yours truly are staying. Here’s the link.

Have a kick butt Monday, everybody! (stop with the eye roll. Monday’s can kick butt!).

Best,

-Scott

P.S. I did a fun interview with the awesome Ross Chevalier (from the Photo/Video Guy Podcast) all about photography and Photoshop education. It’s an audio-only podcast so you can just let it run in the background while you work in Lightroom. Here’s the link if you’ve got a sec. 

Just a quick heads up — this tutorial (which is WAY more interesting than it sounds) is for intermediate-level Photoshop users, so if you’re a beginner, this is one you can out for now. It’s how to use Photoshop Lens tools to fix a bad shooting location. The techniques aren’t hard — they’re actually pretty easy — I’m just moving at a speed for intermediates, and I’m not explaining all the detail behind each step (for example, if I can go to Free Transform and flip horizontal) you’d have to know what that means to get a lot out of it. Anyway, give it a look — it’s pretty wild!

Hope that takes you into your weekend in a wild way (seeing what Photoshop can do in situations like this — pretty amazing, right?).

If you’re a Lightroom user…
I’ve got an intermediate speed and level tutorial for you over at http://lightroomkillertips.com today – it’s a start to finish project, and if you were OK with the speed and style of the video here, you’ll super dig the one over there. Hope you’ll check it out.

Have a great weekend, everybody!

Best,

-Scott

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