Category Archives Photoshop

We’re nearly out of #TravelTuesday’s for the year! How sad! I wonder what the 2019 #TravelTuesday situation will be. The Tuesdays of the future will probably be shinier and more streamlined, but for now I have one of the last 2018 #TravelTuesdays for you. I’m Dave Williams, and as usual I’m here for you, laying down what I’ve learned on my journey as a travel photographer. I hope you’re picking up what I’m putting down! Let’s go!

So, today is all about halves. The half rule, in particular. This is something that will always stick with me since I heard about it, and something that is up there with the most valuable pieces of retouching advice I have heard and can offer back to you.

Firstly, the disclaimer. Very rarely will you see a photographer’s unprocessed RAW file. You’re about to see one of mine. No judging, please!

 

 

So that’s Iceland. More specifically, if you were wondering, it’s up on the hill above the church in Vik at the southern tip of Iceland, facing east. The image is of course quite flat and unsaturated, among other things, that being the very nature of a RAW file. The retouching process comes next as part of every photographers flow, and it’s this to which the half rule applies. Let’s go to work: –

 

 

Here’s the result of my labour. The image has been processed, the sliders have been slid, and the image coming out the other end has far more dynamic range, far more saturation, far more clarity, etc etc. This aesthetically driven approach is how we all work, shifting the sliders around and judging the image by eye. The thing that happens and that we need to be mindful of is that the difference between the flat looking original versus the saturated looking result is actually quite stark but, albeit quickly, that difference is the result of a relatively gradual process whereby we see all the changes occurring along the way. What we perceive at this moment to be a great image may actually be overdone. and that’s not something we want. The half rule is applied now.

By taking the position of all the sliders to the half way points between the neutral and the resulting positions we of course apply half of the adjustment, however that half is often actually enough to have a great looking image without it being ‘overcooked.’ Take a look: –

 

 

The sliders here compared to the last version are more or less half way, with little tweaks here and there as necessary. It’s better than the original, it’s more natural looking than the second shot, and it’s done! The half rule can make a huge difference in keeping our slider-happy tendencies in check!

 

 

I’d love to know how this works for you, feel free to get in touch on my social media – you’ll fine me everywhere as @capturewithdave

Much love

Dave

There have been many cheers that in the most-recent Photoshop CC update, you no longer have to hold the Shift key to keeps things proportional when using Free Transform to resize an object or type. You can just grab a corner and drag. We’ve been waiting for this for 20+ years, and it’s finally here (Photoshop is one of the only applications on the planet that requires you to hold Shift to resize an object proportionally — in fact, it’s just about InDesign and Illustrator left on earth that still make you do that, but they too are scheduled to lose the extra key needed to resize proportionally).

This seems like it would be good news — but there are some folks out there who are mightily pi$›%#!

So, Adobe has released a way for those folks to create a simple one-line script; which you place in Photoshop’s scripts folder, and it makes you hold the Shift key again to resize proportionally.

Now, it would have been awesome if Adobe simply had added a preference setting with a checkbox for “Use legacy Free Transform proportional resize shortcut” (or some other hard-t0-decipher Adobe-like phase), but this is, at least, the next best thing — you get your shift key back without a lot of hassle.

Here’s how to “go back in time” and add the Shift Key back into your workflow (these are the official steps, according to Adobe):

Use Notepad (Windows) or a text editor on Mac OS to create a plain text file (.txt).

Type the text below in the text file:

TransformProportionalScale 0

Save the file as “PSUserConfig.txt” to your Photoshop settings folder:

Windows: [Installation Drive]:\Users\[User Name]\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\Adobe Photoshop CC 2019\Adobe Photoshop CC 2019 Settings\

macOS: //Users/[User Name]/Library/Preferences/Adobe Photoshop CC 2019 Settings/

OK, that’s all there is to it, and your Shift-key holding days are back. :)

Hope you found that helpful. :)

Best,

-Scott

I’m just back from teaching at the Adobe MAX Conference in Los Angeles. An incredible event, in scope, scale and how Adobe pulls it off. Really something special to experience (and thanks to all the folks who came out to my sessions).

During the opening keynote, my dear friend and 21-year evangelist for Adobe Systems, Terry White (seen above), was on stage to show off the new features in Photoshop CC 2019 (he totally crushed it btw — he’s such a gifted presenter). There’s a new workspace for Content-Aware Fill, which is arguably one of Photoshop’s most amazing features already, and this workspace is incredibly helpful. But there were two things — seemingly small — that got the biggest cheers of the entire keynote (not just the Photoshop section — the entire keynote which included some mind-blowing features in other Adobe products).

The biggest cheer was when Terry showed that now in Photoshop when you press Command-Z (Windows: Ctrl-Z) you get multiple undos. You can press it again and again and it keeps undoing and undoing. The crowd roared! Of course, you’ve been able to have multiple undos in Photoshop for years now — you just had to know the secret shortcut — Option-Command-Z on Mac (Windows: Alt-Ctrl-Z). Now, it’s just Command-Z. Ahhhh!

The other was when Terry showed that after 25+ years, you no longer have to hold the Shift key to keeps things proportional when using Free Transform to resize an object or type. You can just grab a corner and drag. Like this:

Last year, I wrote an entire blog post asking Adobe to drop the Shift key thing. It was called “Dear Adobe. It’s 2017. Can we drop the Stupid Shift Key Yet?” and I don’t know if that’s why they did it, but if it helped nudge them in any small way, I’m delighted.

It took a long time, but “dropping the Shift” is finally here. BTW: if you do want to stretch your object, rather than resizing it proportionally, then you (wait for it…wait for it…) you hold the Shift key.

Thank you, Adobe — tweaks, and improvements like this to features we use day in and day out, really make a difference, and these two will have a real impact on our productivity and they make working in Photoshop that much more fun. Also, thanks for the cool big things, too. :)

Have a great weekend, everybody!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. On Monday I’m in the Detroit area with my new “Photoshop for Wedding and Portrait Photographers” seminar, and then in Philadelphia on Tuesday. Hope you can come out and spend the day with me. 

 

yone

Hi, gang and greetings from Los Angeles where this morning Adobe will take the stage for their huge annual conference, Adobe MAX 2018 — held this year at the Los Angeles Convention Center. I’m very excited to be teaching at the conference this year — I’m teaching a class today and tomorrow called “How to Present Like a Pro” and I can’t wait to share a bunch of really helpful techniques with the folks here at the conference.

I’m not sharing anything out-of-turn or secret here, but I will tell you that historically Adobe releases big updates to products like Photoshop and Lightroom during their opening Adobe MAX keynote, (along with other products in the Adobe Creative Cloud, and sometimes they even launch new products), so it could potentially be a really exciting morning!

If anything substantial happens for Lightroom during Adobe’s keynote address, we would cover that over at our sister site, LightroomKillerTips.com – but again, that’s not a guarantee of future events, so…maybe there’s nothing new at all. But if Adobe does announce anything cool, don’t worry — we’d be “on it.”

Heads up KelbyOne Pro Members:
If anything big is announced today, we would generally release an issue of Photoshop User magazine covering anything new announced in the Keynote having to do with Photoshop that very same day (which would be, today). So, if they do wind up announce something cool, look for an issue of the mag to appear right away. Hey, ya never know.

I know it’s a whole lot of conjecture, based on things that have happened at past Adobe MAX keynotes, but if they do have some interesting announcements, at least you know we’ll be on it for you right away!

Hope I see you here at the conference, and hopefully in one of my classes.

Here’s to what could be a very exciting week!

Best,

-Scott
West Coast. West Coast! [Say that in a Snoop Dogg voice].

Yes, it’s me again! Dave Williams, the #TravelTuesday blogger here at Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider, and freshly appointed editor at LayersMagazine.com. I’ve kicked off a new series of #MondayMotivation posts over there and I’d love for you to go check out the first one by Gilmar Smith!

I’m fresh back from a mission to Turkey where I predominantly shot the hot air balloons over Göreme in Kapadokya. It’s home to the densest hot air balloon airspace in the world, with the dawn skies filled with them.

The town is unique in that the buildings are carved and tunnelled into the rocky landscape. I’ll share more about it over on my blog, capturewithdave.com, another day, but today, right here, is all about this shot from the trip: –

 

 

Here’s the caveat, and it’s very important you aren’t disappointed by this: So, you know how this blog is entitled, “Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider,” right? The clue’s in the name.

 

 

This is a composite of two images: one of the cave interior and one of the balloons in the sky. Now, I’ll say at this point, anticipating any comments about how I shouldn’t be faking this, that actually it is a view that is attainable at this location. I just wasn’t in the caves at the right time of day to see it! I was limited by time and didn’t know my way around to find the right spots in the dark before dawn. Anyway, here’s the tip: –

We’ll use a different pair of images, which you can download the PSD file here to try it yourself.

When compositing images, it’s obviously very important to make the result look convincing! As well as good cut-outs and realistic placement of elements, matching the tone is very important. What I’m going to show you is a very quick, very easy, and very good way to match those tones.

First off, get everything cut out and in position.

 

 

The layers are set out in no fancy way for this technique; they’re simply stacked in order. On top, create a new layer and fill it with 50% gray.

 

 

Now, change that new layer’s blend mode to Luminosity. The colours will change, revealing the differences going on in your image. To see them more clearly, add a Saturation layer to this and boost the saturation right up. What we’ve done here is create a representation of the colour in the image.

 

 

From here, add a Selective Colour adjustment mask. When faced with the Properties panel, select the Neutrals from the Colours option, which actually contains most of the colour information. Adjust the sliders to balance out your image and match the colours – it’s hard to explain it because it varies wildly on an image-by-image basis, however when you do it and see it yourself it’ll make sense, I promise!

 

 

The Layers panel should look something like this one below. And, to finish off the image, we just need to remove the Hue/Saturation layer and the gray layer.

 

 

This leaves us with an image which has balanced tones, leaving it looking realistic.

 

 

It’s a simple and fast way to balance tones in a composite, and I’d love to see how it works for you!

Now, this experience is called a “once in a lifetime” thing, and that played on my mind when I was out in Turkey. I wrote a little piece about that, which I’d love for you to read over on my blog.

So, for now,

Much love

Dave

Before we get to today’s tip: just a heads up: Today the last day to enter for your chance to win the same Profoto B1x Strobe I used in that behind-the-scenes fashion shoot video I shared here on Friday. It’s not a photo competition, it’s a straight-up giveaway, so all you have to do it enter for your chance to win. Click on the graphic below, or go to this link to enter right now. Hey, ya never know — you could be the person to win that awesome Profoto B1x.

OK, on to today’s tutorial
I wound using Photoshop’s Content-Aware SCALE last Friday when I was creating the YouTube Thumbnail for my Behind The Scenes shoot, and the image didn’t fit like I wanted it to. After it quickly fixed my problem, I was once again reminded of what an extraordinary feature it is, and how little-used, or even known about, it is. So, today, I’m showing you how to use it, including a few tips that make it even better. Check out the video below:

Hope you found that helpful!

Hey, Lightroom Users in the Washington DC area:
I’m coming with there with my full-day Lightroom seminar on Friday, August 17th. Come on out.

Have a great Monday everybody!

-Scott

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