Category Archives Adobe

Last night, I sat down to write this post and I had a bit of a situation. Well, a bit of a disaster actually! I dropped my phone onto my laptop screen and everything went dark. I’ve just taken my laptop to Apple and owing to my carelessness, I now have a five-day wait and a £460 bill to pay for a new retina screen, and it’s caused a delay in publishing this post! My apologies. Let’s get cracking!

So, every #TravelTuesday, here on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider, I land with a little something for you from the world of Photoshop, photography, travel, and life. Today, I’m going to tell you all about something you should be using, and which Scott showed you yesterday—Adobe Spark Page.

Adobe Spark is a creative suite in itself, within the Adobe ecosystem, which allows users to create social graphics, webpages, and videos on a web or mobile platform, and it’s awesome! In fact, all my header graphics here on Scott’s blog and on my own blog at capturewithdave.com are made using Adobe Spark Post.

Scott used Adobe Spark Page to create his story yesterday about his visit on the USS Harry S. Truman, and it delivered an amazing result both in terms of its aesthetic prowess and its storytelling ability. The user interface for creators is top-notch, as is the interface for the end user.

The app allows us to quickly and easily lay out our images, videos, and words, and it encourages good design and placement. The text alignment and animation creates a user experience with apparently seamless links from one section to the next. The ability to decide on the positioning of our images in a variety of styles, and with additional copy over them, gives us the ability to customise our page and truly tell the story in the way we want it to be seen. 

As a photographer, I am of course a creative, but one friend of mine has some strong words which this app brings to life for me. Graphic Designer and KelbyOne instructor Dave Clayton says in his latest awesome class that a graphic designer is a photographer’s best friend. Knowing how to present your work in the best possible way is important for a photographer, and a graphic designer can help you to do this. It seems that this series of apps is the first step towards that goal.

Adobe Spark is part of your Adobe Creative Cloud subscription, and its best comparison is that it’s basically Microsoft Publisher turned up to 11, and it’s fast!

You can take a look at one of my stories on the northern lights here and one of Terry White’s stories on Iceland here

Have a closer look at the Adobe Spark range and I think, as a photographer, you’ll be pleasantly surprised at what it can do for you. 

Much love

Dave

Hello, hello, hello, and welcome! It’s #TravelTuesday here on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider so I, Dave Williams, am here for you! Yes, that’s right, for you! Every week, right here, I try to either get your cogs turning or share something to make your life a little easier or a little better. (And, it’s no easy task, let me tell you!) But, first off, I have a little story to share with you about an encounter I had with a fox, during which I learned exactly what is and what isn’t covered by the warranty offered by BlackRapid—you can read that here. Moving on, however, let me tell you what I came here to tell you!

The punchy title, above, doesn’t give a lot away really, does it? I tend to do that. I’m not going to say ‘clickbait,’ but yeah, you know. Here’s exactly what I’m going to show you:

Using Adobe Spark Post, it’s really simple to bring one of your iPhone Live Photos to life as a video to easily share anywhere. It’s so easy it’s actually going to make for a really, really short post (so I may have to drag it out somewhat ;-).

Here’s what I’ll show you how to do (I’ve helpfully embedded the file here, as well as provided a link to it separately, just in case you have a disastrous browser situation because I’m nice like that. Anyway, what was I saying about padding this out a little?):

 

 

First up, we need to launch the Adobe Spark Post app on an iPhone. Within the app, get a new project up and running.

Next, let’s add a photo. By selecting a photo already present in the post, or by using the Add Image option, select Photo Library from the list and find the Live Photo in your Gallery.

 

When adding the photo you’ll get the option seen here to select either the Photo or the Live Photo. Let’s choose Live Photo.

 

 

When the entire post is complete, hit Share in the upper-right corner, then select Video rather than Image.

 

 

This will output the post as a short video made up from the sequence of shots captured when you shot your Live Photo on your iPhone, and it’s a great way to share it easily. The file I shared with you is 3.9mb and is in MP4 format. :)

I hope you enjoy trying this method!

Adobe Spark Post is available in the Adobe CC Photography Plan and there’s a bunch of information about the Adobe Spark suite on KelbyOne.com.

Much love,

Dave

Hi, gang and greetings from Los Angeles where this morning Adobe will take the stage for their huge annual conference, Adobe MAX 2018 — held this year at the Los Angeles Convention Center. I’m very excited to be teaching at the conference this year — I’m teaching a class today and tomorrow called “How to Present Like a Pro” and I can’t wait to share a bunch of really helpful techniques with the folks here at the conference.

I’m not sharing anything out-of-turn or secret here, but I will tell you that historically Adobe releases big updates to products like Photoshop and Lightroom during their opening Adobe MAX keynote, (along with other products in the Adobe Creative Cloud, and sometimes they even launch new products), so it could potentially be a really exciting morning!

If anything substantial happens for Lightroom during Adobe’s keynote address, we would cover that over at our sister site, LightroomKillerTips.com – but again, that’s not a guarantee of future events, so…maybe there’s nothing new at all. But if Adobe does announce anything cool, don’t worry — we’d be “on it.”

Heads up KelbyOne Pro Members:
If anything big is announced today, we would generally release an issue of Photoshop User magazine covering anything new announced in the Keynote having to do with Photoshop that very same day (which would be, today). So, if they do wind up announce something cool, look for an issue of the mag to appear right away. Hey, ya never know.

I know it’s a whole lot of conjecture, based on things that have happened at past Adobe MAX keynotes, but if they do have some interesting announcements, at least you know we’ll be on it for you right away!

Hope I see you here at the conference, and hopefully in one of my classes.

Here’s to what could be a very exciting week!

Best,

-Scott
West Coast. West Coast! [Say that in a Snoop Dogg voice].

Image credit: Adobe Stock/determined

Scott Kelby’s Worldwide Photo Walk Day is back at it again this year, engaging thousands of photographers around the globe in pursuit of adventure and local photo ops. Before venturing out, you’ll need to pick your gadget of choice. One thing you may not know is that your phone is actually just as powerful as some DSLRs out on the market—especially when you leverage the RAW capture ability of Lightroom mobile’s camera. Have I piqued your interest? Keep reading.

Many of you might already be using Lightroom to sort and fine-tune your photos, but with the latest update of Lightroom CC , you can leverage the cloud and all its syncing magic. One of the most exciting things about Lightroom CC is that it offers syncing across devices—web, mobile, and desktop—so you don’t need to worry about managing or backing up your files. It also offers guided editing, preset syncing across devices, smart keyword searching, long exposure control, and easy sharing capabilities, to name a few features.

Don’t forget to prep your phone when putting together your photography kit this year! The Lightroom mobile camera is one of the best features of this powerful mobile editing suite. Alongside the ability to capture in RAW, it also has exposure compensation, shutter speed, ISO, and white balance tools right where you want them most: in the camera. Annoyed with your mobile camera AE lock? Manual control of your focal plane means never having to struggle with subjects that are too small for your fingers to tap. Perspective grids and custom image ratios make sure that your photos are precisely composed to exactly your vision, while highlight clipping helps keep your exposure in check while shooting via the screen under bright daylight conditions.

Don’t let the desktop define you, edit where you are. Do you have a look and feel you have developed for your editing style? On the go access to your Lightroom presets means you don’t have to wait until you are home to throw up that fresh set. As with Lightroom Classic, edits are nondestructive, saved, and can always be reverted to your original if you go too far. Bringing along your DSLR but still want to tap the power of field editing? With an SD card reader that adapts to your tablet or mobile phone, you can import your photos into Lightroom’s mobile client, organize into albums, tag, export full-resolution images, and share directly to the social platforms you choose via OS sharing tools. Want to share but not on social media? Try the Lightroom web sharing option to create a web gallery with optional file downloads that you can send to clients, family, friends, or post online.

The flexibility of being able to edit wherever you are, on whatever device you’re on, brings tons of value to photo trips or *ahem* Worldwide Photo Walks. You don’t need to limit your editing time by location, meaning your productivity skyrockets. If you have a favorite camera to use, imagine being able to edit those photos while out in the field. As well, for you phone photographers out there, if you shoot through the Lightroom mobile app, you can capture incredibly high-quality photos to immediately use then and there.

To take your photography beyond the camera, try out Adobe Capture CC , a multi-purpose app that translates your images into usable type, vector shapes, patterns, 3D materials, color themes, and brushes. If you’ve always wanted to try transforming your images with graphics, Adobe Capture gives you the tools to play. Create assets right from the camera in Capture, or import from your Lightroom catalog.

The Patterns module allows you to turn your camera into a kaleidoscope, giving you multiple ways of tessellating what your camera sees. Or you can create seamless tiling patterns for use as backgrounds, composite resources, or design elements. Another interesting feature for photographers is the Shapes module, which turns your phone’s camera into a vector graphic-making machine. This gives you the power to create infinitely scalable graphics out of regular photos, to use as logos, illustrations, animations, and more.

The assets you create in Capture are available immediately via Creative Cloud Libraries on compatible desktop and mobile apps. Snap a shape, and immediately find it in your CC Libraries panel in Photoshop and Illustrator. Generate a color palette in the Colors module to immediately use it in InDesign, After Effects, and more. Find your assets in the Creative Cloud Libraries panel on desktop, or in the associated asset panel in mobile apps. Want to share your asset wealth with others? Share right from in the Capture app, or on the web with Creative Cloud Libraries.

If you’d like to learn more about Adobe Lightroom CC and Capture CC, check out the resources below before going on your next trip for Worldwide Photo Walk Day!

https://theblog.adobe.com/lightroom-cc-try-it-and-learn-it/

https://theblog.adobe.com/august-lightroom-cc-releases/

https://blogs.adobe.com/jkost/2018/08/new-features-in-lightroom-cc-mobile.html

https://theblog.adobe.com/creative-refresher-capture-transforms-world-design-assets/

https://helpx.adobe.com/mobile-apps/help/capture-faq.html

 

Pollyanna Macchiano is a mobile app enthusiast and design program manager at Adobe who thrives on being involved in the arts: writing, doodling, and general nerdiness included. Powered by green tea and mochi.

 

 

 

 

Hello, internets! It’s #TravelTuesday again, so I’m here to impart some kind of wisdom onto you, and today it’s all about tweaking colour with Camera Raw’s Hue sliders. But first!

I’m writing this post from a Starbucks just outside of the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park in Scotland, fresh from an overnight stop before I head farther north towards the Isle of Skye. I’m shooting a couple of little projects involving drone photography and Platypod tripods. You can keep up with what I’m doing on this trip by following me on social media (look for @capturewithdave) and by watching the @kelbyonepics Instagram story!

On with the blog!

The HSL  (Hue/Saturation/Luminance) Adjustments panel in Adobe Camera Raw is very useful, but perhaps most confusing are the Hue options. While the Saturation and Luminance sliders enhance the colours, the Hue sliders actually change them. There are some pretty powerful things you can do with the Hue sliders—you can even change the seasons in post if you tweak the colours the right way.

What’s actually happening when you adjust a colour slider in the Hue tab is that you’re moving its position on a colour wheel. In terms of its practical application, I’ll use the Hue sliders to adjust this photo and make the grass greener, whilst maintaining the other colours.

 

 

In this shot, the tones up in the sky are beautiful—the sun lowering in the sky (it’s 9pm) is casting a fabulous orange glow—but I feel like the grass should be just a little bit greener. We can take advantage of the Hue sliders and make this adjustment easily right in Camera Raw.

 

 

Using the Hue sliders to shift the colours within sections of the colour wheel, if we move the Yellows slider (the colour of the grass in this case) towards the green end, and compensate with the Oranges and Greens sliders to maintain the actual green and retain that orange in the sky by moving those sliders away from the yellow ends, we’ve easily achieved our goal! It’s as easy as that!

 

 

 

That grass is now greener, which to me is more realistic and more pleasing, and all it took was an understanding of what’s going on with the Hue tab’s sliders.

Much love

Dave

Heads up! I’ve rebranded somewhat – I was using the guise Hybrid Dave and have switched it all over now to Capture with Dave. You’ll find me by using the handle @capturewithdave across all platforms, and at capturewithdave.com. I’m still the same guy, and I’m working on some great content for you all, so watch this space. Let’s kick this off!

Combining the awesome features of Adobe Spark Post and Instagram Stories will make your stories stand out from the crowd, affording you a winning combination of animation and interactivity to give you the creative edge.

Your Adobe Spark Post app is included in your Adobe Creative Cloud subscription, along with Adobe Spark Page and Adobe Spark Video. Here are my seven killer tips for combining Adobe Spark Post with Instagram Stories – let’s go!

1. Select a template that matches the dimensions of a phone screen. Don’t forget they’re all slightly different, so allow some bleed as if you’re printing, and then go in and set the palette and font to match your brand.

2. Once you’re happy with your own template, create your first post and save it. That way, every time you create a new post, you can simply work off the last one by opening it up, duplicating it, and making the necessary changes.

3. Make the most of the animation features that you can apply to the background and the text. Make it dynamic and eye-catching!

4. Don’t forget which features you can only use effectively within Instagram. These include tagging accounts, locations, weather conditions, and polls. If you intend to use any of these features, be sure to leave space in your post on Adobe Spark Post and add that element in Instagram when posting your story. If you tag an account, for example, in the text on Adobe Spark Post, it won’t work within Instagram as a tag and the tagged account won’t be notified, nor will your viewers be able to click on it! Similarly, if you want to tag a location (which will give your post a chance of being featured on that location’s story), you must do it in Instagram – again, a tag within Adobe Spark Post won’t be recognised by Instagram.

5. Use your Live Photos to make quirky clips. When you open a Live Photo from your iPhone in Adobe Spark Post, it gives you two options: use Live Video or use the still. This Live Photo of Roberto Pisconti (@robypisco), standing in front of his name in lights when he visited London last week, was perfect for that!

6. If you record a screen capture and want to change it, like in this clip, to have a practically seamless change of content from an Instagram element (in this case a poll) to an Adobe Spark Post element (the moving text), then consider options to help you do this, such as taking a screenshot, which is how I ended up using two Instagram Story posts to make this.

7. Make the most of the design features of Adobe Spark Post to give your story the best feel and the biggest impact. You can do all kinds of things with the text in the post – just play around with it and see what potential it has!

Thanks for checking this out! If you watched my Instagram takeover from Iceland in January, this is how I made house posts. I’d love to see what you do, so when you use Adobe Spark Post to create your story, tag me – @CapturewithDave – I want to see what you can do!

Much love

Dave

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