Category Archives Travel Photography

I’m back from teaching my travel photography workshop with Mimo Meidany in the stunning Tuscany region of Italy. It was a truly epic week, and my most fun workshop ever.

I did an Adobe Spark page (well, it’s now called “Adobe Express“) with some of my favorite photos from the trip. It’s the story told in pictures and, captions, and I included lots of behind-the-scenes shots, and the camera and gear info as well.

If you’ve got a minute, I hope you’ll give it a quick look.

Here’s the link.

Thanks, everybody, and here’s wishing you an awesome Monday.

-Scott

I only do a few hands-on travel photography workshops each year, and I’m very excited to announce one absolutely unforgettable. Come join world-class photographer Mimo Meidany and me in the beautiful Tuscany region of Italy this fall – October 5-8, 2022 for our Timeless Tuscany Travel Photography Workshop (with an opening dinner and get-together the night before). 

Italy’s Tuscany region is one of the most photogenic places on earth, and the quaint, charming village of San Quirico d’Orcia, is our home base for the workshop. We’ve got a wonderful little hotel there – it’s the Hotel Residence Casanova Wellness Center and Spa, and it may well be in the single best location in all of Tuscany for exploring the region photographically. It’s close to everything; we have a wonderful on-site classroom, with great restaurants and shopping all within walking distance. It’s a pretty magical location all the way around, with the rolling hills of Tuscany at our doorstep.

We’ll be shooting on location and spending time in the classroom each day, learning a lot, shooting a lot, and we’ll be having lots of fun and making new friends all along the way. 

The workshop is limited to 12 participants, so If you’re interested in joining us, go grab your spot right now before it sells out (all my previous workshops have sold out in advance). Here’s the link to my workshop’s website with tickets and more info:

http://scottkelbyworkshops.com

It’s going to be an incredible experience, and you know you’ll come home with some incredible shots, great stories, and memories to last a lifetime. I hope you can join us for “Timeless Tuscany.” :)

Ciao, ciao!

-Scott

P.S. Did I mention the food? Ohhhhhhh, the food. If you love Italian food, wait until you have it in Italy. Did I mention the wine? Ohhhhhhhhh, the wine.  :)

It’s #TravelTuesday and I, Dave Williams, am here to share. This week I write from Austin, Texas, and with the Photography Gear Conference coming up, I want to first take your mind elsewhere and talk about how we can broaden our photographic minds by taking influence from other creatives.

We’ve all heard countless times about how graphic designers and photographers should work with similar things in mind. Copy space is the go-to example that I always use to highlight the importance of keeping graphic design in mind when we take photos. In that example, I point out that we should be thinking about copy (words) and leave room for titles, graphics, and everything else we see in magazines and on posters. These photos tend to perform the best on photo stock libraries like Adobe Stock and Getty Images because of their versatility when it comes to their final use. I learned a lot more than that recently at an Adobe event – Russell Brown’s Rock & Roll Reunion.

The two most important take-away points I feel were offered at the conference are the two I want to focus on today:

1 – Work happy, not harder

Mark Heaps created this tagline to best explain that we use far more time than we should in parts of the process that could be automated or simplified, leaving us with a lot of wasted time that could better be spent on something creative and therefore make us happier. Mark speaks about this concept regularly and has absolutely nailed the process. We should be looking for ways to work smarter, automating elements of our workflow and giving ourselves the time to focus on our photography and retouching. The application of this concept translates from graphic design into photography and it’s a great point that we should focus some energy on if it allows us to be more creative in the future.

2 – Create a story, and an ecosystem

When graphic design projects are undertaken they tell the story of the brand or the campaign. We should always be looking to do this in our photography. Telling the story of the scene in a single image, or across the series for multiple images, is a way to connect with our viewer that is often overlooked. We can focus on the subject, the composition, the light, or any other factors of our image, and use them to try to tell the story of what is happening in our shot to draw our viewer that little bit closer. This can help us to keep someone’s attention for longer on social media and drive our engagement, or it can be the difference we need to convert that engagement into a revenue stream. Telling stories through photography is something that Ansel Adams himself did, and something that seems to be lost here and there. The importance cannot be stressed enough and just as designers are trying to tell stories with typefaces and shapes, we should be doing just that with our photos.

Much love
Dave

It’s #TravelTuesday and I, Dave Williams, am here as always! I’ll get onto today’s subject very shortly, but first, I have big news!

Instagram has restored the chronological feed it lost when it was acquired by Facebook, but the algorithm-driven feed remains by default. To get your chronological feed, click here.

Now, let’s get back to the main event: “When it clicks.” I want to explain that persevering in photography can bring great rewards.

At some point in our journey as a photographer, things start to click. The idea and the dream of taking on photography as a hobby can all come crashing down fairly quickly when we switch the dial to M and realise that the exposure triad is a whole puzzle we need to wrap our heads around. Just like the exposure triad, light is something we need to learn to see and read, as well as understanding composition, depth, and a whole plethora of other things.

Each of us learns these things in our own way and at our own pace. Understanding what our pace is, along with our individual methods of learning, will help us, but eventually, it will click. There will be times when you will feel like throwing in the towel, and that’s fine. But, please don’t. Please stick with it.

My dream was to have an image featured in National Geographic, and I see myself as being halfway there. National Geographic bought one of my images for their magazine, but my goal has shifted sideways, and now I want to write a feature. It’s a big dream, I know, but life would be fairly boring if we didn’t aim high. Having these kinds of dreams is often the reason people pick up a camera for the first time.

There’s often an overwhelming element of seriousness to photography, and it can honestly feel like all the pros we aspire to shoot like are so serious and professional when shooting. Well, let me show you what it really looks like at times: –

If you’ve ventured out on the path to becoming a photographer (rather than a camera owner) and you feel like it’s all a bit complicated, just stick at it and remember this one little piece of advice: –

Take what you do seriously, but don’t take yourself too seriously.

Photography can become a heavy subject and there are a lot of things we need to wrap our heads around when we first start out, but there isn’t a photographer out there who just picked up a camera and naturally knew what to do with it. Persevere, learn the theory, get out and practice, and eventually, it will all click into place. I promise.

Much love
Dave

It’s #TravelTuesday and I, Dave Williams, am here once again! I write today from the valleys of North Wales where I intend to spend a couple of days geeking out and taking photos of low flying military aircraft (because I’m an “avgeek,” if you didn’t know) and that’s all part of my plan to reinvigorate myself by undertaking a personal project. Anyway, that’s not what I’m going to write about today. Let’s get into it.

I want to make one solid point today. As photographers, we cannot underestimate the value of constantly learning. Take a look at your favourite “all-star” photographers and you’ll find they are all constantly learning. The quest to better yourself as a photographer falls down to learning, learning, and learning. There are so many fantastic resources out there. Take a look at KelbyOne for instance and you’ll see what I can only describe as an absolute plethora of content that’s geared to providing the maximum learning opportunity to us all.

Reading books, watching YouTube videos, listening to podcasts, reading tutorials in magazines, attending workshops and conferences, whatever method works best for you, I implore you to please do it. I mentioned that our favourite photographers are constantly striving to improve, and this is absolutely true. You’ll find Scott at workshops, and you’ll find me studying books, you’ll find Kaylee Greer diving into webcasts and literally, every KelbyOne instructor will be doing something similar because we cannot possibly teach you if we aren’t up to speed ourselves. Here are some of my favourite resources: –

I mentioned KelbyOne already, so here’s the official lowdown: KelbyOne is a collective of absolute legends in photography and retouching, and with no holds barred, they share their skills and knowledge with one aim – to help you.

YouTube channels including PixImperfect, Photoshop Training Channel, and PhotoshopCAFE are all great places to learn about how to retouch images in Adobe Photoshop and other Adobe apps. Knowing how to do this stuff after we’ve taken our photos is really valuable.

I could spend a long time telling you about books, but I’ll simply say that reading any of Scott’s many books will help with learning if old-fashioned paper is your method.

Honestly, learning is critical. Learning can be the difference between us being booked or not, or between us selling images or not. It’s the difference that’s going to help us succeed in photography, whether that’s personally or professionally, and we must never underestimate the power of learning.

Much love
Dave

It’s #TravelTuesday and I, Dave Williams, am here as always. This week I write to you from Lofoten in northern Norway. I’m on a mission to capture the northern lights while I’m here, amongst other things, and so far it’s going pretty well. I had to bunker down for a couple of days because a polar storm rolled in, but just as it cleared I got a solar storm. Perfect timing!

This week I want to evoke your mind and get you thinking about why you love photography. I know that many of you will have photo-centric New Years’ resolutions, so hopefully, this will help a little.

Here’s a shot of me and Erik ‘the rocketman’ Kuna in Germany getting our waterfall shots on point. We’re both in pretty much the same spot but ended up with different images, and this leads to the point of today’s post.

For me, photography is many things. One of those things, and perhaps the most important, is that I really enjoy showing the world in the way I see it. I was talking to Scott about this some years ago and I said to him that one thing that resonates with me is the phrase, ‘lend me your eyes and I’ll show you what I see.’ He said it made him think of literally plucking someone’s eyes out, and I get that, but the subtext remains the same. It’s the amazing power to convey my vision through photography. I can rock up at a location and put my own spin on it, capturing a moment in time and a place in space and, from the capture through to the edit, I can put my spin on it. It’s a combination of reportage and art.

So what is it for you? What do you enjoy about photography? There’s something to think about today as 2022 starts. With the knowledge of what it is about photography that you like, build some goals and get out there and achieve them!

Much love

Dave

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