Category Archives Travel Photography

If you are, I think I can help you come back with some of the best images you’ve ever taken. Check these out these courses this weekend:

> If you’re heading to Europe, check out one of my “Photographer’s travel guides” on where to shoot in:

I hear from photographers all the time who tell me how helpful these were to them, and what a difference it made in the images they brought back from their trip.

>> If you’re heading to New York City this summer, next week we’re releasing my “Photographer’s Guide to New York City” and it’s not the same ol’ places you’re used to (well, it’s a few of them, but lots of interesting and fun places you might not have known about). Should be out next Thursday. Can’t wait to share this one with you.

> If you just want to learn about Travel Photography in general, check out my Travel Photography course on KelbyOne — it’s a two-part course: Part one is on the shooting, and Part 2 on the post-processing, and it’s filmed on location in Paris.

> Rick Sammon has a great travel photography course that’s a great compliment to the one I did in Paris. He has lots of great insights — totally worth checking out. Here’s the link. 

> Another great online course — this one from Colby Brown — it’s on How to Make a Living as a Travel Photographer. Here’s the link — really great info. 

> We also have some awesome members-only Webinar you can watch, streamed on-demand, including my “A Walk in Lisbon” travel photography Webinar, and “A Walk in Venice” and another — From Prague to Budapest” – plus join Rick Sammon and me for a members-only Travel Photography Webinar.

> A while back I did a talk on my trip to Cuba, and it had lots of tips and locations, so if Cuba is on your travel list, you can watch this one right on YouTube. Here’s that link. 

Whew! That’s a lot! Hope those help you to get your very best travel images yet! :)

Have a great weekend everybody — it’s a perfect one to start prepping for those summer photo trips.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Just 12-days until the annual Photoshop World Conference in Orlando. People are signing up every day (a bunch signed up just this week). You can still sign up and join in. Detail/Tickets right here.Hope you can make it.

Hey hey! It’s me again! I’m Dave Williams, and every #TravelTuesday I’m right here at Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider to share some of my bountiful wisdom from the worlds of photography, Photoshop, travel, and life. Well, today it’s the last two—travel and life! I’m writing this post today from aboard the SuperSpeed ferry from Kristiansand, Norway to Hirtshals, Denmark, and I’ll try to explain my wanderlust.

So, if you’ve been following along on the KelbyOne Instagram story, you’ll know that I’m currently on a mission where I’m riding across Europe from my hometown of London. The purpose of the trip is twofold: (1) to have a little adventure, and (2) to shoot and write for three projects for companies who are involved in my trip—namely Platypod, Triumph, and Sim Imaging. It’s point number 1, though, that I will be exploring with you here.

My wanderlust, my thirst for travel and adventure, is strong and deeply rooted. A little-known fact about me is that I lived in South Africa for eight months, in a little place named Franskraal, just outside Gansbaai which sits between Cape Town and Cape Aghulas. I lived in this tiny little village on the coast, spending my days exploring the countryside and seeking out wildlife, and I spent my evenings dining on fresh, local fish and meat whilst watching the sun go down over the South Atlantic Ocean as the whales leapt and waved their fins at me. Before this, I’d been to a handful of countries whilst growing up—Spain, Greece, France, Barbados, Germany, and the U.S. (Disney World in Florida). It’s this experience that kick-started my desire to travel and see the world. But, then there’s another factor that comes into play: the camera.

I remember being given a camera by my parents on my 14th birthday—a Nikon F40, I think. I’d looked at photography and I wanted to be able to do it, too. I wanted to be able to make great images. To show the world as I see it. Through my eyes. I spent quite some time coming to grips with how it all worked. I wasn’t reading much, but I was experimenting. I was getting used to what happened to my photos when I changed various settings. I was learning about composition. I fancied myself as a bit of a ‘”proper photographer” and kept learning through doing.

Fast forward a number of years and combine the two, and now I was in a place where I’d returned home from South Africa after a few fails. I knew that one thing I wanted to really push harder with was my photography and another was my desire to see more of the world. I got my first DSLR, a Sony Alpha. I was now able to make more photos and spend less money doing it! I was coming to grips with Photoshop too, starting with the cheesy things we all hate like selective colouring, but also the essential things to learn how it all worked!

So, pushing on a bit more, my first “big” solo trip was to Iceland. I fell in love with it, and in fact, with what I can only describe as difference. I like to compare the world with my world. See how other people live. See what’s good about other cultures. It’s true to say that you only appreciate what you have when it’s gone. And, this relates here because it’s only when you go deep into another culture or another place that you really see what you have at home and appreciate it more, while also bringing back positive influences and ideas from the places you visit. Take the Danish concept of Hygge, for example. This mindset, which apparently makes the Danes the worlds happiest people, can give us so much in our lives and it’s only through exploring this idea and this culture, then comparing it with our own, that we can really benefit from it. The Icelandic have a phrase that I absolutely love, and it’s only through coming into difficulty while in Iceland that I know about it. I was in the Westfjords at the Arctic Fox Centre shooting a pair of awesome fox cubs. My camera broke, it was a very expensive one, and it had sustained water damage from a waterfall. I was able to borrow a camera for the rest of my trip, so the few days remaining weren’t wasted, and I was told at the time, “thetta reddast.” My expression must’ve reflected the ultimate confusion when it was uttered to me, but when I asked what it meant it made perfect sense. The explanation I was given from Midge, who’d said it to me, is this:

“Thetta reddast. It means everything will turn out fine. Things happen, you have no control over them, and whatever is happening just know that it’ll all work out and everything will be alright.”

Well, that nailed it! It’s hard to understand sometimes, of course, but everything will be fine. Everything will work itself out. So, it’s little things like this, little bits of learning from across the world and the feeling of accomplishment and knowledge when I go visit another part of the world, along with seeing new landscapes and the amazing things we have on our planet, that drives me to see as much as I can. It’s only been a few years that I’ve been traveling hard, and in that time my goal was to get the number of countries I’ve visited higher than my age. I’m happy to say that I’ve achieved that and I fully intend to keep it that way for as long as I possibly can!

I love to travel and to see the world and all the amazing things it has to offer, and I love to share the images I make, too. I ran this quote past Scott and he laughed at its weirdness, but I’ll put it out there:

“Lend me your eyes and I’ll show you what I see.”

I will. Let me show you what I see, and let me inspire you to please see as much of this world as you can. You only get one shot, after all. Don’t let things pass you by, grab opportunities and, indeed, make them, too. Wanderlust is real.

Much love

Dave

It’s #TravelTuesday right here at Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider, which means that I, Dave Williams, get to drop in again and share a little something with you all! Aren’t you lucky!

Well, here in London, it has stopped raining for a few minutes, so what better time to drop a top tip for shooting in the sunshine. In the upper half of the world, the days are getting longer, the sun is getting brighter, and the cocktails are tasting better. When we don’t perhaps have the time to shoot during the golden hour times the sun can be something of a hinderance, but that’s only if we let it be. With these tips, you can overcome the hurdles it presents and make the most of shooting at the time when we’re all told as photographers not to! Here goes!

The dynamic range in this shot at the Vatican is immense, but still, with seven bracketed shots and the right post-processing, we have all the detail across the entire spectrum

Shooting bracketed shots, three is usually enough, and merging them into an HDR image goes a long way in reducing the glaring highlights and dangerously deep shadows caused by bright, direct sunlight on a summer scene. I’m not talking over-processed, high-vibrance, unrealistic HDR here, I’m talking about using the benefits of a High Dynamic Range to bring balance back to a photo which would otherwise have a lot of contrast and, therefore, not show off your scene. Using the Merge to HDR function in Adobe Camera Raw is the most straightforward way to do this—just select the images you wish to merge, then Right-click and choose Merge to HDR.

This blend of 2 bracketed shots was just enough to expose for the highlights and the shadows touching down in Utah

High Dynamic Range shooting and processing is absolutely ideal for bright, sunny conditions where you lose details and where your image loses quality. You can have a potentially amazing composition of an amazing subject, but if your image is clipped or your shadows are hiding awesome details, then you’re letting your image down straight from the get-go. That’s what I’m trying to tell you, though—it doesn’t have got be that way! There are people out there who are still put off by HDR’s history of being a bit too “in-your-face-surreal,” but it’s just not like that anymore. Well, not unless you want it to be!

Any excuse to show goats in a tree! The three bracketed shots here are blended to keep the look as realistic as possible, with no high saturation and no surrealist look

When you shoot with your iPhone, turn on HDR or use Auto-HDR on a sunny day to capture well-balanced images, and when it comes to your DSLR or other camera make sure you know how to shoot bracketed images. Over on KelbyOne.com, you can learn all about the specifics of how to merge your images using different techniques that give different results, and I urge you to start doing it now that the sun’s back out!

Much love

Dave

Buongiorno, everybody! I’m back from an amazing (and quite yummy) week in Venice, where I was leading a travel photography workshop, along with long exposure photography expert Mimo Meidany.  I put some of my favorite images from the workshop together, along with the story and behind-the-scenes shots, in a Spark Page.

Here’s the link if you’ve got a sec: https://spark.adobe.com/page/1iHJGY3Gku9Es/

Thanks in advance for checking it out (and I hope you’ll share it if you do).

I’ll be back on my blogging schedule next week now that I’m back, and until then, here’s wishing you an awesome weekend!

Ciao, ciao!

-Scott

Welcome, welcome, welcome! It’s #TravelTuesday and here at Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider that means, like every Tuesday, I’m here to share some love! This week I want to kick off a little series of Bucket List Photography destinations and tell you all about why Norway is on the list.

 

 

Norway is certainly one of the most photogenic countries in the world, offering the entire range from modern cities through to barren wilderness. With clearly defined seasons it’s not what I’m used to in the UK where everything tends to merge together in a wet cloud of grey, where the day can have glorious sunshine followed immediately by sub-pro temperatures and sideways rain. In Norway at least you know that if it’s cold, it will be consistently cold!

 

 

The magnificent fjords of Norway mean that going from A to B can take a while as you meander the contours of the landscape, however it also gives Norway 62,706 miles (100,915 km) of coastline! The only country that beats this coastline length is Canada. If you’re a fan of the coast then Norway is for you!

 

 

Sticking to fjords, the sheer cliff faces and gushing waterfalls sitting below glacier caps offer what I think is up there with the worlds most beautiful of views. Beautiful arctic light cast on lush green fed by melt water from those glaciers must be on your bucket list too, surely?

 

 

The northern cape, crossing the arctic circle at 66 degrees north, takes you into a whole new world. The cold is cold, the aurora shine bright across a star filled sky, and fishing villages sit on a rugged coast. Killer Whales, Arctic Tern, Reindeer, a wildlife photographer with a little patience will have nothing but rich pickings up here.

 

 

Norway is designed for photographers. Literally, I heard that from a good source, a photographer listed all the amazing things they want to see and one day Norway just appeared. There was also an angry man with a great big beard and an axe there. True story.

 

 

I’ll keep the bucket list destinations trickling through here on ScottKelby.com – have you been to Norway? What was your favourite sight?

 

 

Get in touch right here in the comments, or find me anywhere by searching @CaptureWithDave, I’d love to see your Norway shots! I’m heading back to Norway in just a couple of weeks and you can follow my mission on my Instagram Stories as I ride from London, through France, Belgium, Holland, Germany, Denmark, and into Norway, I’d love you to see it!

Much love

Dave

Hello there fair people of the internet! I’m Dave Williams and I’m here every #TravelTuesday on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider. This week I’m writing you to tell you about my trip to Stockholm this past weekend and what I’ve done there in terms of generating some new stock assets, along with my experiences along the way.

If you’ve been keeping track with my Instagram Story (you can catch up on my Highlights if you missed it) you’ll know that here in the UK we’ve recently felt the wrath of the Beast From The East, and this weekend we were hit with part two, the beast returns! The reason it was so named is because meteorological folklore describes easterly winds here in the following  rhyme: –

Winds from the East are no good for man nor beast

Which basically means if the wind is blowing from the east it’s likely coming from Siberia and will be bitterly cold, so any condensation in the air (which we have a lot of owing to our maritime climate) will turn into snow. It’s good to know a bit about weather systems when you’re a travel photographer – most importantly so that you know when to stay nice and cosy in bed! With that in mind, I headed East to Stockholm to meet this beast for myself! I’m a bit strange like that!

The reason I chose Stockholm is largely due to my love for all things Scandi, but partly because I went there a few years ago and discovered that they have an absolutely incredible metro system. It’s basically an enormous art installation with all the stations having something different about them, my favourite of which being the ones that resemble caves. It’d get me into the relative warmth too and away from that beast! While I was there I took advantage of the Platypod Ultra I’ve been working with and provided the great people of Platypod with some more BTS shots. If you don’t have one, get one!

So, that Metro system… I speak very little Swedish, but one thing I can translate is tunnelbana – tunnel train! The only other thing is takk – thanks. That’s literally the extent of my Swedish. I can, however, show you why the Tunnelbana is often called the world’s longest art gallery.

 

 

A short while ago I wrote a post here about the importance of personal projects, and for me this was very much a personal project. I visited Stockholm three years ago and this was a test of self improvement, and a break away from reality because right now there’s just too much going on and it’s important to take care of number one! Saturday night and Sunday were spent having time for me, but during the day on Saturday I was on a mission with this project!

I hope this helps provoke you all into self-development and a little project just for you!

Much love

Dave

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