…..sports portrait photographer, blogger, and post processing shark; Dustin Snipes.

My assistant Brad Moore had turned me on to Dustin’s very cool work about a month or so ago, and he’s also got a great blog (here’s the link) where he gives some background into his shoot (including production shots). He’s got a very cool post-processing effect for his images, and he’s planning a post-processing technique for his guest blog post tomorrow, so I’m pretty psyched to see it (though he’s not just a post-processing guy—-his lighting and composition is spot on). So, make sure you check back to catch his Special Guest post.

41cezb03rl_ss500_I don’t normally do book reviews, because I don’t think it’s right for me, a Photoshop and photography book author, to publicly criticize another author’s Photoshop or photography instruction book. It just ain’t right. Luckily, with this book I don’t have to (which is why I’m making an exception and doing a book review).

I just got a copy of “Footprint Travel Photography” by Steve Davey (published by FootPrintBooks), and I have to tell you, I’m very impressed. Here are seven things I love about this book:

  1. The author is a great travel photographer, and this book is loaded with this beautiful images.
  2. It’s got a nice, clean layout that makes you want to read the book
  3. It’s broken down into short, digestible one, two, and four page sections on a particular topic or idea.
  4. The author writes in a very conversational style, and gives lots of detail without getting overly techie, or trying to sound like he’s smarter than you (he is smarter than me, but he doesn’t rub it in your face).
  5. Although there are lots of small photos in the book, the layout does allow for a decent number of large photos, and they really have an impact.
  6. I love the smaller form factor of the book. Not too big, yet wide enough to accommodate a lot of photos.
  7. But perhaps what I love best about this book (and what made me want to write this review), is that he did something I find very valuable. For every photo in the book (and it’s packed with photos from exotic locales around the globe), he tells you exactly where the shot was taken. Often times, more than just the city, and country. Sometimes, he’ll tell you exactly where at the location he took the shot (from across such-and-such a river, or from a plane flying over, etc.). It drives me nuts when I see a great shot in a travel photo book, and there’s no mention of where the photo was taken, so I was particularly delighted to see how well he covered this thoughout the book. Also, after mentioning the locale, he usually adds a few lines of background info or a tip.

I could only find one thing that I would change about the book, and that is the font size for the regular text is really small (and I’ve had a lifetime of being accused of using too small a font size, so small sizes don’t normally bother me) and the caption-sized text (of which there is quite a lot) is crazy small (either that, or I’m getting really old. I’m probably getting really old). But that wouldn’t stop me one bit (in fact, I’m having to nit-pick to get to that).

I’m going to be spending some more time with the book this week, but since I was excited about it, I wanted to share my first impressions on this new book. Here’s a link to it on Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.com. It’s around $20. Totally worth it.


One of the highlights of my trip to San Francisco was getting to see the Hearst Gallery’s retrospective on one of the most brilliant digital artists of our time, our good friend (and Photoshop Hall of Famer) Bert Monroy. What an amazing exhibition (and beautifully presented by the gallery—kudos to them for an outstanding job).

The gallery was closed that day, but Bert arranged for us to have a private tour with him, and it was just amazing. I’ve seen Bert’s amazing photo-realistic work many times over the years, but seeing it at that scale really revealed the incredible detail that he puts into his work.

The shots below give you just a glimpse at the retrospective, and besides his work (all output on the latest Epson printers—including an entire section of the exhibit printed on large canvas), they had a number of important stepping stones from Bert’s career, including corporate work he had done in the early days, his first book (the first book ever on Adobe Photoshop), and even Bert’s original 128k Macintosh (shown below). It’s an amazing exhibit and if you’re out in the San Francisco area (the Hearst Gallery is just outside Berkley in Moraga, California—here’s the link), you’ve got to see it for yourself. Stunning work from a living legend, and true pioneer of digital art.






I can’t believe it’s already Friday. Here’s what’s up:

  • On Tuesday I came into my office and sitting on my desk was something that made my whole week. One of my readers here on the blog had sent in a $1,000 donation check for the Springs of Hope, Kenya orphanage. Talk about being humbled by someone’s genorosity. I continued to be so impressed with the way you all have stepped up to make such a difference for these kids. (Note: I just heard from Molly & Joesph that a shipment of freeze dried meals arrived today at the orphanage—-enough for 60,000 meals! Whoo Hoo!)
  • Dave Cross has had two very interesting folks in his popular “Finish the Sentence” feature; Katrin Eismann, and Dave Cross himself. Here’s the link to give it a quick read (I always find this feature really interesting).
  • There’s an in-depth review of David Cuerdon’s Beauty Retouching Kit online class over at the Pursuing Photoshop blog. Here’s the link.
  • The 2nd part of Ed Greenberg’s amazing series on copyright for photographers is now up online at PhotoshopUserTV.com. This is a must-see series for anyone interested in protecting their images. Here’s the link.

That’s it for today. Have a great weekend everybody and we’ll see you back here on Monday. :)

Hi gang: I’m back from a couple of days out in California (including a full day out at Adobe HQ), and here’s what’s up:

  1. First, what a incredible post yesterday from photographer and educator Chris Orwig. He had a record-breaking 157 comments, and truly inspired and moved a lot of us. His images were fantastic, his words were powerful, and he really hit one out of the park with his wonderful post. Way to go Chris—you rock!!!!!
  2. National Geographic posted this year’s winners from their popular “World in Focus” photography competition, and there are some amazing shots there. Here’s the link to check out some of the winning images.
  3. Just a reminder: The Photoshop World $100-off Early Bird Special ends in 29 days, so if you’re thinking of going, make sure you sign up now to take advantage of that $100 off the conference registration. Here’s the link to sign up.
  4. Big news: Last week (and this week), we were lucky enough to have Attorney Ed Greenberg, who specializes in copyright issues for photographers, as a guest on Photoshop User TV, and I have to tell you—-it was AWESOME!!!! I learned more about copyright in his segments than I could have imagined, and he is just absolutely brilliant about this stuff. Here’s the link to watch it right on the site. A big thanks to Ed for sharing this incredibly valuable information (and for making it so much fun—-he’s a really engaging speaker!).
  5. We just released a very special online training class on shooting wildlife from none other than the wildlife photography guru himself, Moose Peterson. His class was shot on location in Yellowstone, and he’s just got some amazing stuff to share in this exclusive Kelby Training online class. Here’s the link to check out what he’s covering.

That’s it for today folks. Have a great Thursday and we’ll catch you back here tomorrow for my Friday wrap-up.