Monday
Nov
2013
04

Today at 12:00 Noon ET We Announce The Winners of My 6th Annual Worldwide Photo Walk

by Scott Kelby  |  10 Comments

Hi Gang: Join me here today at 12:00 pm noon EST (New York Time) for my official announcement of the 10 finalists (all prizes winners), and the Grand Prize Winner from the 6th annual Worldwide Photo Walk.

We’ve got some amazing prizes on the line, and some absolutely wonderful images to share, so I’ll see you then — right here on the blog. Good lucky everybody! :)

-Scott

Friday
Nov
2013
01

Worldwide Photo Walkers: The Springs of Hope Orphanage Needs Our Help!

by Scott Kelby  |  15 Comments

Hi Gang: On Monday I’m excited to be announcing the Finalists and Grand Prize winner from my 6th Annual Worldwide Photo Walk, and thanks to our sponsors we have some really amazing prizes this year, which is awesome.

Besides all the fun and photos, each year we do something very important, and that is we raise money for the Springs of Hope Orphanage in Kenya (an orphanage built literally from the ground up with help from the people who read this blog and participate in the Worldwide Photo Walk) by donating 100% of the profits from the sales of official Worldwide Photo Walk t-shirts (a sample is shown above and below, but they come in different styles and colors, including hoodies, sweatshirts, ladies’ cuts, kid’s t-shirts — you name it).

Here’s where we are so far: 
Rob Jones
, of Towner Jones Photography (the wonderful, big-hearted guy who coordinates our whole t-shirt store) let me know that t-shirt sales are down quite a bit this year. So far, we’ve only raised around $6,000 but our annual goal is to send the orphanage $10,000.

Here’s How You Can help:
(1) Order a t-shirt now. If you participated in a walk this year, I hope you’ll consider buying a shirt (or two) to help feed and cloth these wonderful kids (which is an on-going struggle for this small orphanage). Your donation helps more than you know (plus, you get a cool shirt besides). Here’s the link.

(2) Make a direct donation: If you already have the t-shirt, or just want to make a Direct Donation to the Springs of Hope Kenya Orphanage, click right here (and know at that moment that you’re about to do something that really, really makes a difference in the life of a child). If you go the direct donation route, can you please just leave me a comment here to let me know, so I can personally thank you.

Thanks to everyone who already bought a shirt, and to everyone who will graciously help and buy one today or who donates directly, and a big thanks and big hug to Rob Jones who year after year has dedicated himself to this project, with both his time and talents, and I am very grateful (and so are the children).

P.S. Don’t forget: I’ll be posting the winners of the Photo Walk CONTEST by 12:00 PM Noon ET on Monday! Also, if for any reason your local leader didn’t pick a winner for your city, we go and pick one on their behalf. 

Thursday
Oct
2013
31

It’s Free Stuff Thursday!

by Brad Moore  |  72 Comments

What Happened To RC?
RC Concepcion and crew went to Gary, Indiana to record our highly anticipated Exposing HDR course.

Sounds great, right? Well, it was going great until something went terribly wrong (we think), but we lost the feed and this is the only footage we have.

What happened to RC and crew? Are they in danger? Will we ever see them again? Will we have to get another instructor for our Exposing HDR course? We don’t know, but you can check in at KelbyTraining.com on TODAY at 4pm EDT to find out! You have no idea what will be unveiled!

Leave a comment for your chance to win a 1-month KelbyTraining.com subscription.

Fall Photography Field Guide with Matt Kloskowski
The air is crisp and carries a faint scent of wood smoke, while seemingly ordinary towns and locations transform into a blazing array of color. Autumn is upon us! The color of the changing leaves combined with natural and man-made landscapes sets the stage for some of the most interesting, colorful, and impactful photos of the year. Join Matt Kloskowski in Fall Photography Field Guide as he goes through exactly what you need to capture those fall colors in all of their beauty. Whether it’s in your home town or you are traveling someplace new, you only have a short window of time to make these photos. This new class will help you make it count!

Leave a comment for your chance to win a 1-month KelbyTraining.com subscription.

Kelby Training Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNallyMatt Kloskowski, or RC Concepcion? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby
Nov 14 – New York, NY
Dec 3 – San Diego, CA
Dec 9 – Toronto, ON

One Light, Two Light with Joe McNally
Nov 13 – Los Angeles, CA
Nov 18 – San Francisco, CA

Lightroom 5 Live with Matt Kloskowski
Nov 6 – Fort Lauderdale, FL
Nov 15 – Sacramento, CA
Dec 6 – Seattle, WA
Dec 13 – Jacksonville, FL

Photoshop for Photographers with RC Concepcion
Nov 1 – Phoenix, AZ
Dec 11 – Calgary, AB

Don’t forget, if you register for a seminar at least 14 days in advance, you can save $10 by using the code KTL10 at the checkout. And leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

B&H Wilderness Photo Competition
Want to win an African safari for two? B&H Photo, Video and Pro-AudioWilderness Safaris and South African Airways are pleased to present to you the B&H Wilderness Photo Competition, the most exciting outdoor photography contest there is. There are lots of categories, as well as prizes including B&H Gift Cards and safaris to Botswana and Namibia valued at over $16,000! Head over to WildernessPhotoCompetition.com to see all the categories and enter for free between now and January 14, 2014.

The All New LensProToGo.com
LensProToGo just made renting the gear you need even easier than before with their completely redesigned website! The new LensProToGo.com website was created to take all of the hassle out of renting. Some of the new features include the ability to:

  • Change your rental period to see pricing change site wide.
  • Blaze through huge orders by quickly adding multiple items to your cart via the new search bar & product browse screens.
  • View gorgeous new product photos that show you exactly what you’ll be getting, in detail!
  • Take our expert staffs’ advice and check out our recommended accessory pics for every product.
  • Pay your way!  In addition to now accepting Discover, you can save multiple credit cards to your account for more options at checkout.
  • Make your accountant happy with our new detailed invoices that list complete payment histories.

Now, along with LensProToGo Labs – their savvy blog that gets updated daily with everything from industry news to reviews and tutorials – they are truly an amazing resource for any photographer or filmmaker.

To celebrate the new design they are offering everyone 10% off of ALL rentals from LensProToGo.com from now until November 30th. Use the code SAMEPEOPLENEWSITE when checking out.

Leave a comment for your chance to win a $150 gift card, good towards any rental from LensProToGo!

30% Off Tutorials from Serge Ramelli
This week only, our buddy and well-known French photographer and Photoshop instructor Serge Ramelli is offering 30% off his tutorial downloads! He has courses that include black and white photography, Lightroom training, Lightroom presets, Photoshop training and more! Head over to PhotoSerge.com and fill up your cart, then enter the promo code HALLOWEEN at checkout to get your 30% off!

Aviation Photography Workshop
If you’re into aviation photography, you’re going to want to check out this workshop in Peachtree City, GA with 3G Aviation Media! Learn how to photograph in natural light, light subjects with small flash, shoot details, process your images, and more. The workshop is taking place November 15-17, and you can get more details and sign up right here.

Last Week’s Winners
KelbyTraining.com Subscription
- Micah

Kelby Training Live Ticket
- Alex Alegre

If you’re one of the lucky winners, we’ll be in touch soon! That’s it for today, have a great Halloween!

Wednesday
Oct
2013
30

It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring John Harrington!

by Brad Moore  |  3 Comments


Photo © Charlotte Richardson

I appreciate the opportunity to share a few thoughts and experiences here as a guest blogger on Photoshop Insider. I’ve been blogging regularly for over six years over on my blog Photo Business News. Aside from the various photo business related news, one of the common themes I blog about is the business side of photography.

Why?

Simply put, if you love photography – and want to earn a living at it – if you don’t include in your daily routine an attention to the business-side, you won’t be earning a living at it for very long.  If your dream is to one day change careers to become a professional photographer and earn a living at it – then attending to the (sometimes) hum-drum nature of estimates, invoices, bills, and receipts is critical, alongside with the matter of pricing your work to survive and thrive. In the early years I stumbled along the way. I’d like to save you some of those lumps and struggles.

DETERMINING A CLIENT’S BUDGET
Often one of the hardest things to do is to have a client tell you what their budget is. Now, there are many occasions where they will – the key is to ask! Sometimes, a client will tell you they don’t know, but more often than not when they say that, they do.

There is a point in the conversation where you have had a good dialog with the client and you feel like you’ve made a connection with them. At this point, as you’re letting them know you’ll send along your paperwork, I typically will ask:

“Did you have a budget you are trying to work within for this?”

Can you guess the operative word in that sentence? Usually when I ask that question during a presentation people say “budget” or “within,” but as the process of elimination works it’s way through the sentence, someone says “trying.” If someone asks for a portrait to be shot, and they say $100, there’s no way we’ll be able to work within that. $2,500? Yes. $1,500, maybe, it depends.


Photographing Register of Copyrights Maria Pallante for her official portrait. Photo ©Lindsay King

Consider that you’re a really good architectural photographer. There are many levels of photography within this realm. There’s the “realtor with a camera” that snaps a shot of the front of a house at high noon when the light is at it’s worst. Then at the other end there’s the high end commercial real estate photographer who will do a site visit to scout the location, identify the best time of day to take the photo for the front elevation and an alternative outside view. They will work with the building manager to ensure all the blinds in the windows are at just the right height, and that all the lights are turned on. They will get permits to clear the street in front of the building of cars, and if it’s a winter shoot with deciduous trees in front of the building, they will ensure that the finished image has a tree with leaves on it through the magic of Photoshop.


Photo © John Harrington

 

When you run into a client who says they don’t have a budget, this is when you can start asking questions:

YOU:  ”I’m trying to understand the level of production to bring into play for this shoot. Were you trying to keep this to under $5,000?”

CLIENT: “Oh my. I didn’t think it would cost that much. I figured it would be about $500.”

So here we have a huge disconnect. If this client came to you, the really good architectural photographer, because there were amazing shots of all sorts of buildings and high-end home exteriors, shot with just the right balance of dusk daylight and warm glowing windows, clearly you’re not the $500 level of photographer.

YOU: “You’ve had a chance to look over my website, and for what you’ve budgeted, I can stop by the next time I’m in that neighborhood and shoot a shot. Did you want me to worry about if the sun is on the front of the building, or did you just need a snapshot?”

CLIENT: “Oh, I really want the sun on the front of the building.”

YOU: “Ok, well, in order to know that, I’ll need to do a site visit. That takes extra time and effort.”

CLIENT: “Ok, well I might be able to afford $1,000.”

YOU: “I understand that you came into this project with a few ideas as to what it would cost to do the photograph. You’ve seen my work, and those images have been used to encourage builders to build, buyers to buy, and renters to rent, all sooner rather than later.  One extra month’s rent from one tenant is a significant amount of money, and this shoot, even at $5,000 is a small fraction of that.”

CLIENT: “I just don’t understand why it costs so much.”

YOU: “There are a number of factors. The first is time, but not just in the ‘by the hour’ type of thing. Not only do we need to do a site visit, but we need to coordinate with the building manager (or current tenant if it’s already occupied and/or a home). We then need to schedule our time to be there not just for the exteriors, but the interiors you want as well. We will then get a permit to block off the street so people can see the entire building and we don’t risk a large truck being parked outside all day. I’ll have an assistant working with me to get everything looking just right as well. Then, once we’re done with all the photography, we spend a fair amount of time on each image back in the studio making it look its best, adjusting color and light. We’ll also remove the parking meters and street signs that are visual distractions. We’ll add in green leaves to the tree as if it were Spring since this picture is being taken in the Fall after all the leaves are gone. If everything goes well, it’ll take a day. If not, it’ll take two. Then if we have weather delays when it’s overcast or rainy, we have to reschedule.”

And the explanation can go on and on. There are a myriad of variables here. Maybe you don’t need to pull a permit. Maybe it’s Spring already. In the above example, a $5,000 budget would be great for a large commercial building in a business district. It would take us time to do all of the things necessary. If we had to cut costs perhaps we’d shoot fewer interiors, or one exterior view. Maybe a permit isn’t needed, and maybe maybe maybe.


No, that’s not a family member of mine and my second cousin. That’s two hired stylists staging and styling a home for a photo shoot. Photo © John Harrington

Some portraits call for a level of production that includes wardrobe, separate hair and makeup stylists, and so on. Some on-location photo shoots call for a production trailer (usually a customized motor-home that goes for about $800 a day including driver) so models can change in the back while the client has a place to work and review images in the front. Catering comes into play when there are a number of players on the shoot and we are shooting across a mealtime – who wants everyone scattering to find the nearest Subway or Quiznos? At some point your shoot will call for a producer who will make all these arrangements for you, for a fee of about $750 a day.


A separate talent trailer and one for the client means that honest and candid conversations about the talent can be had discretely, and the client doesn’t have to hear if the talent is displeased with something. Photo © John Harrington

Asking “what budget are you trying to work within?” isn’t a trick question – an honest answer from the prospective client gives you an understanding as to the level of production they expect. If it’s a portrait shoot where the client only has $750, then it’s a pretty lean shoot with a small seamless, a few small soft-boxes and one final image as a deliverable and a limited rights package. If the client wants to be able to review the images on-site and see some basic or conceptual retouching, then having a digital tech using our digital workstation with a 30″ external monitor along with a Wacom tablet adds in anywhere between $750 and $1500 to the shoot production. Adding in a makeup person for the day adds in $500, a separate stylist doubles that. Separate hair? Yep, another $500. So a lean shoot at $750 adds in $750 for a digital tech to $1,500, and then separate hair and makeup brings it to a $2,500 portrait. Yes, your take-home remains $750 plus whatever markup you have, but the production level more than tripled the bill.

ESTABLISHING CONFIDENCE TO WIN THE ASSIGNMENT
There are countless things that take place before a shoot is brought to you via a phone call or email. More often than not, the intermediaries in the PR department of an organization have been tasked with finding a photographer for a project. Perhaps there’s an ad agency and a publicist for the VIP talent, and so on. The more intermediaries, the more pressure for it to work perfectly. Even on the smallest of CEO shoots, their PR person is on the hook for you doing a good job and not making them look bad. So, if they call you and say:

“Hi, this is Jane Doe with ACME Widgets, and we need a portrait of our CEO with the production line in the background. Are you available next Wednesday?”

Saying anything other than something like this doesn’t instill confidence:

“Sure we can do that. We do executive portraiture all the time. In fact, we just wrapped up a series of executive portraits last week. Wednesday works well for us too, but we’ll need to check in with the regular makeup person we use for portraits of this caliber, unless your CEO has someone they prefer to use whenever they do media appearances?”

This sentence said smoothly and with a confident tone, demonstrates a level of professionalism and attention to detail that will set you aside from others.  Then there are a myriad of questions to ask next that will further demonstrate your experience here:

“Does the CEO have a vision for the shoot? By that I mean – is s/he trying to demonstrate they are a hands-on CEO that is connected to the production line staff, or an authoritative CEO in full command and control? A few ways to illustrate these two styles would be without a suit jacket with sleeves rolled up, or with a buttoned up dark suit and crisp white shirt shot from a low angle to demonstrate power and authority.”

“Do we need to ensure that the production line is running next Wednesday at the time s/he’s available, or is it a 24/7 operation?”

“Is the CEO approaching this with enthusiasm or are they reluctant to do the portrait? Knowing this helps us understand how to approach them on the day of the shoot to get the most out of them.”

In one instance, we were called on to do a portrait of a duo in three separate locations, within 45 minutes. What seemed as a logistical nightmare actually was an opportunity for us to sell the client on our problem-solving abilities. We demonstrated how we would pre-set all the lights with a producer for each location. Our budget was north of $10,000, but we were the only photographer who demonstrated we could do it within their timeframe. Afterwards when we asked how they came to select us, that’s how we learned that not only were we the most expensive, but also, the only one they were confident could accomplish the shoot within the available window of time.


One of the three setups for this duo we photographed. Photo © John Harrington

Realizing that you have to exude comfortable and cool confidence during the initial phase of the conversation, as well as enthusiasm for the shoot will start you off on the right foot. Your job is, yes, to make great images, but also, to make the person who hired you look great too. In doing so, not only will they be happy with the results, but they will be sure to book you in the future.

Last week we got a call on Tuesday for a shoot on Wednesday. The company – which I won’t name but you’d know their name instantly – was coming to Washington DC for a last minute photo shoot. It was a big deal for them – as their top communications person who handles all of it and reports directly to the President and CEO, was flying in. We had two hours to do two shoots. No lights, one assistant. No permits, no time. During the course of the back-and-forth we talked through our creative ideas and our solutions for the shoot, as well as the workarounds to the permitting issue. We had a signed contract by 5pm, and re-adjusted our schedule for an early morning start. At 7:30pm in DC, an email came in (they’re on West Coast time so it’s still working hours for them) saying the client needed near real-time images to put out on social media. We responded by 8pm telling them “no problem” and added in our digital workstation to the mix to handle that. After the shoot, we sent an invite to the image gallery on PhotoShelter, and got back a really wonderful email:

John-

I don’t even know where to begin thanking you.

Everything could not have gone more smoothly for us because of you.

Our clients were THRILLED to have you along for the ride, and super impressed with your experience and credentials in D.C.

You made everything super seamless, and I can’t thank you enough for your flexibility and go-with-the-flow attitude.

So glad we found you… thank you {referring colleague who was CC’d} !

All the best-

This is exactly the type of client we not only strive to have, but also, strive to deliver for. This is a client who recognizes the value of a premium service, and for whom price is not a deciding factor, but instead, only a detail. They CC’d their colleague within the firm who recommended me, which makes him look good and so he’ll be sure to refer me again. The firm, in turn, looked great to this company who was doing a very high profile project that the CEO wanted executed, so the in-house guy who reports to the CEO gets kudos from his boss too.

Warren Buffett said it best: “Price is what you pay. Value is what you get.” He also said “Your premium brand had better be delivering something special, or it’s not going to get the business.”

If you’d like to hear more from John, check out this interview he recently did with The Photo Brigade!

Washington DC Photographer John Harrington has covered the world of politics, traveled internationally, working as an editorial and commercial photographer. He has completed assignments for or his work has appeared in The Washington Post, USA Today, Time, Life, Newsweek, The National Geographic Society, and Rolling Stone. Author of  Best Business Practices for Photographers, John has lectured across the country to every major trade association. He currently serves as a National Director on the board of the American Society of Media Photographers, and concluded serving his second term as the President of the White House News Photographers Association in May of 2011.  A 2007 recipient of the United Nations’ Leadership Award in the field of photography, he also received the NPPA’s Morris Berman Citation in 2007 for special contributions advancing the interests of photojournalism, and in 2013 he was awarded the J. Winton Lemen Fellowship Award  for continuing outstanding service in the interests of press photography and for outstanding technical achievement in photography.

Tuesday
Oct
2013
29

Decoding The Creative Cloud Options for Photoshop Users

by Scott Kelby  |  50 Comments

This past week at the Photo Plus Expo in New York, I heard from my team at the NAPP booth on the expo floor that there’s still a lot of confusion among folks who are interested in upgrading to the Creative Cloud, so I thought I’d do a real quick, simple post with what your options are all the way around, along with hopefully clearing up some other misinformation.

NOTE: Here I’m just focusing on the question at hand: how to upgrade to the latest version of Photoshop, not all the plans for the full Creative Cloud and all the other applications that come with it.

1: You have never owned Photoshop:
You can get Photoshop CC (the latest version) for $19.95 a month

2: You owned a previous version of Photoshop (any version from Photoshop CS3 to CS6)
For you, Photoshop CC is $9.99 a month PLUS you get Lightroom 5 as well and 20GB of cloud storage and a Behance Prosite (custom web portfolio) as well. Sweet!

NOTE: This deal is only available until Dec 31st of this year. If you wait until after the first of the year and miss locking in this insanely low price, whining is strictly forbidden (well, at least here anyway). 

3. You owned Photoshop as part of the old Creative Suite (any version from Photoshop CS3 to CS6).

OK, at this point, you’re kind of hosed, because there is no good “downgrade path” from the full Creative Suite to just one single product like Photoshop. So, you have three options:

Option 1: You can pretend you never owned the Creative Suite and pay the $19.95 a month for Photoshop alone.

Option 2: You can get the upgraded version of your entire Creative Suite, (the full Creative Cloud with Photoshop CC all the Adobe CC Apps like InDesign, Illustrator, Premiere Pro, After Effects, Dreamweaver, and a bunch more) for $29.95 a month, which is a savings of around $20 a month over what someone who didn’t own the Creative Suite would pay. This is probably the best option, since you wind up with a totally upgraded Creative Suite called “The Creative Cloud”

Option 3: Wait and see if Adobe comes up with a “downgrade deal” so you can go from all the Creative Suite applications you currently own down to just Photoshop and Lightroom for $9.95 a month. The problem with Choice 3 is; that deal doesn’t exist yet, and there’s no guarantee that it ever will.

Do I think Adobe might come up with a downgrade deal for CS users? I hope so, and I actually think so. I’ve talked directly with Adobe about how photographers stuck in this Creative Suite Purgatory feel and while Adobe hasn’t made some of these decisions as fast as many of us would probably like, they are listening. This is all new territory for them (and the biggest business decision probably in their history), and I imagine they want to hear from everybody on all sides, really analyze all this stuff, and make sure they make the right decision.

OTHER STUFF REAL QUICK:

1. You don’t EVER run Photoshop in a browser. It works just like it always did. You just use your browser to download Photoshop CC onto your computer, just like you would from an App store.

2. Do you NOT have to be constantly connected to the internet to run Photoshop CC. You can run it offline just like you always did.

3. You don’t have to store your photos in the cloud. Ever. You store them on your computer just like you always did.

4. Photoshop CC is the latest version of Photoshop. When you upgrade to Photoshop CC, you get every Photoshop upgrade as soon as they’re released, as long as you stay a CC subscriber.

5. Photoshop works the same way it always did, so don’t let the word “Cloud” freak you out. The biggest difference from a usability standpoint is that instead of buying a “Box” of Photoshop at the store (like we used to do), instead now you download it (so you don’t get a box, but you still get Photoshop).

6. If you don’t want to upgrade to Photoshop CC, you can buy the last non-subscription version of Photoshop, which is Photoshop CS6. It’s $699. You still have to download it, but you don’t have to pay a monthly subscription fee.

I hope that helps clear the fog on a few of these issue for people who are interested in upgrading to Photoshop CC. If you’re not interested, I’m sure we’re going to hear from you anyway, right? ;-)

By the way: here’s the link with more info on Photoshop CC, including a download link.

I’m up in Boston today, teaching my “Shoot Like a Pro” seminar, so I won’t be able to respond to any of your comments here, but hopefully some of my crew back home might jump in and help if they can. I hope to meet some of you here today in Boston so make sure you come up and say “hi.” By the way, if you’re coming to my seminar, I would dress warm. Brrrrrrr — it’s cold up here!

Monday
Oct
2013
28

Here’s What’s Going On This Week

by Scott Kelby  |  6 Comments

Check out this quick “helicopter fly-over” of my seminar
The folks from IntelligentUAS & DJI Innovations were at my seminar on Friday in Washington DC and did a flyover of the seminar crowd using a DJI Phantom (with Zenmuse H3-2D and GoPro Hero 3+). I love that overhead video view. Too cool!

I’m on my way, today!
I’m teaching my “Shoot Like a Pro” Seminar there tomorrow at the Hynes Convention Center. Over 500 Boston-area photographers have already signed up, and if you want to come too, it’s not too late: Here’s the link: http://bit.ly/14bAUDJ

Next Stop: New York City on Thursday, November 14th.

I’ll be back for “The Grid” on Wednesday
I’m heading home right after my seminar on Tuesday, so I’ll be back for live airing of “The Grid” on Wednesday. Matt had a really good topic for this week….I just wish I could remember what it was, but I do remember thinking, “Man, that would make a great topic!” so make sure you tune in to see if I was right  (LOL!). It’s this Wednesday at 4:00 pm ET (New York Time) at http://www.kelbytv.com/thegrid 

What will photography look like 10 years from now?
PC Magazine did a nice write-up on the Photo Plus Expo industry panel I was part of on Wednesday night where we tackled that very question. Here’s a link if you’ve got a sec: http://bit.ly/1g3BbNi

Here’s one for Lightroom users
I get a bunch of questions about managing your images and folders in Lightroom, and Matt just did a really great, short, to the point video about it in his “Lightroom Killer Tips” show, and I included it right here (above).

Don’t Miss Wednesday’s Guest Blog
This week, we welcome Washington DC-based photographer John Harrington, and he has some really pragmatic business advice for photographers on working within a client’s budget (and determining what that budget really is). It’s a really insightful post and you don’t’ want to miss it this Wednesday right here.

That’s it for Monday. I’m off to Boston, and I hope I’ll get the chance to meet you there! Cheers (no Boston pun intended). ;-)

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