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  • Ever since I first heard this lens was coming (and that seems like forever ago), I have just dying to get my hands on it. For past year or so I had been relying on my 16-35mm, but then I got a Canon 14mm prime lens and fell in love with it, but the thought of having a zoom that goes all the way out to 11mm, yet not being a fisheye, made it (at least on paper) my dream lens (photo above courtesy of B&H Photo)  We took a family vacation just a couple of weeks ago and I got Canon to loan me one for the trip so I could do a field test, and see if it was all it was cracked up to be. Right before I left on the trip, Brad wanted to borrow it for his concert shoot…

    OK, I had planned to swing by the office and pick up a camera body, a lens, my tripod and a cable release, but we were having a busy family day and we wound up at my brother's condo (a 4th of July family tradition) without a camera. His condo overlooks the bridge leading to Clearwater Beach, Florida and his balcony has a great view of the fireworks, and since this was Clearwater's 100th anniversary, they promised the Bay Areas biggest fireworks display. All the more reason why I should have made sure I had time to swing by the office and pick up my gear. Sadly, I did not. Luckily, my brother loaned me his Canon Rebel 2Ti, with an 18-200mm lens. He even had a tripod, but no cable release, but beggars can't be choosers, so I was happy to have anything.…

    s Hi Gang, and happy Friday: Tomorrow (July 4th) is a big holiday for us here in the US — it’s Independence Day — a day where all Americans celebrate their independence from Glyn Dewis and Dave Clayton (shown pictured with me above. They both serve as Beefeaters in service to Her Majesty The Queen as Yeomen Warders of Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress the Tower of London, and Members of the Sovereign's Body Guard of the Yeoman Guard Extraordinary, but they are shown here in the regular street clothes, but you know and I know, those clothes are anything but regular). If you’re thinking of shooting some fireworks shots tonight, I wrote an article for ColaCola’s Journey website where I take you through the recipe for how to make Awesome Fireworks photos (It’s a step-by-step article — follow the recipe and ya can’t miss). Here’s the link. I…

    Taming Natural Light with Erik Valind Natural light is all around us, but it is up to the photographer to control it in order to make a beautiful portrait. Join Erik Valind as he shows you how to tame that natural light, from direct noontime sun to overcast and shadowless days, and capture killer portraits with little more than just your camera and a reflector. No speedlights or strobes are required for this class. Erik teaches you about the factors that you can control, and then walks you various techniques you can use through a series of real world demonstrations, each one building on the last, that will give you the skills to start seeing and using natural light in new ways. Click here to see the first lesson of this class for free! Getting Started with Dreamweaver with Janine Warner Take control of…

    OBJECTIFY YOURSELF
    Enter my world cautiously, for all is not what it seems, and behind every image, there is always more than a single truth. We’re living in a world consumed by fear of the truth—but is there really such a thing as “the truth” anymore—especially in visual terms? It is fear of the unknown that causes people to judge and criticize—fear of an illusion created by our own experiences and teachings. One individual’s perspective may not be the same as another’s, because we process and interpret visual stimuli in a variety of ways. Thus, what is reality, if not a collection of diverse perspectives?

    Now that I’ve got the exposition out of the way, allow me to introduce myself. My name is Gisela Calitz, and I like to create worlds that viewers can explore, fantasy realms where—even if just for a fraction of a single second—everything is perfect. These ethereal worlds are my personal attempts at escapism, snippets and daydreams, where anything and everything is possible and dreams can become realities (even if just in print). Sometimes, I find there are surprising amounts of people who share my love for these ethereal fantasies, which is why I do what I do. So, I guess the logical question from here would be, what exactly do I do?

    I’m a high fashion advertising and editorial retoucher. Generally, we make a lot less money than our everyday advertising counterparts, but I guess if I were in it for the money I would’ve been a doctor, or a lawyer. Case closed. I fell in love with the industry at an early stage in my life and have not looked back since. I thrive on working with people who are stimulated by fantasy and all things whimsical in nature, and I strive to highlight these elements in everything I do. Sometimes, I get lost in an ocean of colour and light; sometimes my work feels like a lucid dream, and I don’t want to wake up.

    Now, I’ve come to a point in my career where I’ve embraced the parallel between what I do to make a living and how I live life. Like life, the journey of an image through various editing suites (whichever they may be), involves a series of choices, each of which has its own set of consequences. And just like life, these choices need to be approached with a certain degree of forethought and caution. In the end, tools like Photoshop and Lightroom are just that: tools. But it’s the human on the other end of these tools that is instrumental in the progression and, eventually, the execution of a quality image. I’m that human on the other side.

    In Photoshop, as in life, there are a myriad of approaches at your disposal. There are technical retouchers and artistic retouchers, just like there are doctors and surgeons. Sure, they may use some of the same tools, but the end results are often vastly different. In my line of work, experimentation is crucial in discovering the ideal creative process. That’s why I’ve spent a large deal of my life experimenting. I’ve chosen to do things my own way, opting for a totally unique route—the road less travelled, so to speak. The results… well, I think they speak for themselves really.

    It all began a few years ago when I was studying design and working as model. I approached a photographer I admired to do a design project on his work. No holding back. We began collaborating on more projects, and so my love for retouching blossomed. From there, it developed so rapidly it consumed me entirely.

    Hi Gang: Once a month on "The Grid" RC and I do our "Blind Photo Critiques" episode where we ask our viewers to submit images for a live critique on the air. When the submitted images are portraits, we often see the same type of problems again and again, so I thought today I'd share a few hopefully helpful things to ask yourself about a portrait image to see if you're on the right track — kind of a checklist to mentally take your image through to see if it's working. This checklist is short and simple, and certainly not complete, but at least if you've asked yourself these things about it, you'll be ahead of the game. Here we go: (a) Does your subject look engaged, either with the camera or someone in the frame (or just off frame)? Peter Hurley has a…

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