Friday
Aug
2012
17

My NFL Football Shooting Season Starts Tonight!

by Scott Kelby  |  23 Comments

That’s right baby, NFL Football Season is here, and I’ve been assigned to cover the Tampa Bay Buccaneers home games for Zuma Press, and I am psyched!

I’ve got a season credential to shoot all 10 home games, starting with tonight’s pre-season against the Tennessee Titans, and then next week the Bucs play at home again against the Patriots, and the first Regular Season home game is against the Carolina Panthers.

I’m really looking forward to working with Zuma Press this year (they featured a couple of my shots last year for their “Sports Photo of the Day”), but I’m still very grateful to Kathy Miller and the great folks at Southcreek Global Media (which closed last year) for the opportunities and support they gave me, which led to me getting me in front of the folks at Zuma.

I’ll have more to share next week, but for now it’s time to get geared up for my first game of the season (Brad, pack up the 400mm f/2.8! Whooo hooo! :-)

P.S. There’s a “This Weekend Only” deal today, so make sure you scroll down to the next post! 

 

Friday
Aug
2012
17

Special “This Weekend Only Deal” on Blurb Photo Books: 25% Off!!!

by Scott Kelby  |  7 Comments

Get 25% off your next Blurb book!
This is a sweet deal from Blurb.com (makers of awesome photo books, and I wish this deal had been available earlier — I’ve printed five or six books in a row through Blurb.com since it’s now integrated directly into Lightroom 4, and the quality has been really great!!!!
Here’s how Blurb describes it, but don’t let the fact that it sounds a bit like “Marketeze” throw you off — their stuff is fantastic! Highly recommended!
“Blurb enables anyone – whether first-time book makers or experienced pros – to design, publish, promote, and sell beautiful printed books and ebooks. You can use Lightroom 4 (see the new Book module), Adobe InDesign®, or Blurb’s free book making tools.
And if you make a book by Sunday at Midnight ET, you can save 25%. Just use the code BECREATIVE. Visit Blurb.com and get started today.”
Special Checkout Code: BECREATIVE
Get it while it’s hot (well, get in on it this weekend, anyway!). Thanks to Blurb.com for making this deal available to the readers of my blog. We always dig a great deal!
Cheers,
-Scott
Friday
Aug
2012
17

The 2012 Worldwide Photo Walk T-Shirts Are Here!

by Scott Kelby  |  4 Comments

Once again, we’ve got some really cool t-shirts for walkers and leaders this year (one of the shirt designs are seen here), and once again (with the gracious help of Rob Jones of Towner Jones Photography), we’re using this to give back as 100% of the profits from t-shirt sales go directly to the Springs of Hope Orphanage in Kenya. 

Last year (with Rob’s help and generosity) we raised over $10,000 to feed and cloth the children), and this year we’re hoping, with your help, to hit $15,000 (which they could really, really use and we can really, really do)!

There are a number of different colors and styles, including mens and ladies cuts, so I hope you’ll pick one up right now and show your support for the walk, and more importantly for the Springs of Hope Orphanage. :)

Here’s a link to order yours today

NOTE to Walk Leaders: The link for Walk Leader’s special “Leader” t-shirts is on your Leader Dashboard. At least, that’s where it was last year.

Thursday
Aug
2012
16

It’s Free Stuff Thursday!

by Brad Moore  |  34 Comments

One Light, Two Light with Joe McNally in Miami
Want to see the magical unicorn of lighting himself, live in Miami? Join Joe McNally this Monday, August 20 for five hours to see how to make the most out of one and two lights and get amazing results! Here are just a few of the things attendees are saying about this seminar:

“Joe was funny, entertaining and full of amazing insights and information. I would highly recommend his seminar to anyone!”

“I wish Joe could have had another day of training with us. I learned a lot about my speed light. I learned way more than I thought I would. I just wanted to keep it going.”

“Joe gives a lot of “why” behind the “what”. His explanations are brilliant, honest, and effective.”

You can sign up at KelbyTraining.com, and leave a comment for your chance to win a free ticket! I’ll pick a winner tomorrow.

Photoshop World
We’re just three weeks away from Photoshop World Vegas at Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino! Join us September 5-7 for an exciting, fun-filled, potentially life-changing event. Have you seen The Hangover? Yeah, it probably won’t get that crazy, but we still have a good time and learn a lot about Photoshop and photography!

If you register in the next week, leave a comment for your chance to get a free pass to a pre-conference workshop (that still has availability)!

Photoshop CS6 for Photographers Seminars
Scott Kelby is bringing the Photoshop CS6 for Photographers Tour to Sacramento next Wednesday, August 22, then heading to Denver a week later on August 29! Join Scott for a full day of all the essentials photographers need to know to make the most of the latest version of Photoshop. But, don’t worry if you’re not completely up to date… You’ll be able to follow along just fine if you have Photoshop CS4 or later.

Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these seminars!

Win an Epson Stylus Photo R3000 from Kelby Training!
That right, Epson and Kelby Training have teamed up to give away a Stylus Photo R3000 printer to one lucky winner! All you have to do is go to KelbyTraining.com/epson and enter your information for a chance to win. Simple as that!

If you’re a Kelby Training subscriber, make sure you check out The Art of the Black & White Print, which features the R3000. And check out this review of the printer from RC Concepcion:

Last Week’s Winners
1-Month Kelby Training Subscription
- Gbeliera

Kelby Training Live Seminar Tickets
- Susan Koppel
- Rachael May
- Shawn Highfill

Photoshop World Pro Pass Upgrade
- Linsey

We’ll be in touch soon with details on your prizes. Congratulations!

 

Wednesday
Aug
2012
15

It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Sam Spratt!

by Brad Moore  |  21 Comments

An Introduction
Let’s get formalities out of the way because I want to talk about things bigger than me when given a Scott Kelby Soapbox.  My name is Sam Spratt and I am a 23 year-old illustrator who focuses on realism. I’ve had the pleasure of making paintings for a mess of major publications, websites, celebrities, corporations, and oddly enough, even a few photographers (the profession which brought about the decline of illustration) such as David Hobby, Joe McNally, Lara Jade, and my good friend, that guy who did the Twilight poster. To watch some examples of how I sketch, render, and paint things, you can follow this link. Obligatory preamble complete. Now let’s move on.

The New Old
I am a knowing hypocrite. I roll my eyes at the Instagram-ification of photography – slapping vintage filters on digital photographs to make them appear old and organic. I loathe the skeuomorphic interfaces in Apple’s user-experience design – digital leather-trimmed calendar apps, paper textured digital notepads, and synthetic camera click sounds trying to make something “classical” which should be as clean and minimal as the aluminum hardware it rests in. Yet… I’m a painter of the digital variety, who has built a career off of translating techniques and concepts learned through Baroque-era oil painting courses into a modern medium. Pixels have replaced pigment for me, but they’re pushed around just the same.

Maybe it’s not as simple as swiping through some preset effects and slapping filters on filters over my every meal with a button press, but the core idea is the same: art and technology are converging into a Kurzweil-esque singularity and we look over our shoulders to build something on top of what came before it.

New mediums don’t always replace the old ones. Anyone who has ever used Photoshop knows that the tools aren’t the manifestations of mere synthetic coding robots, they’re explicitly modeled for usability after old-medium artistic techniques and workflows.

With every new iteration, software simultaneously distances itself from where it came from with new capabilities, as well as shifts the entry-point to older techniques, making them even more accessible. There will be a point in the not too distant future, when cameras pick up anything we can see and anything we don’t — ISO, megapixel, aperture, and shutterspeed will be irrelevant buzzwords. The boom of point-and-shoot, iPhone photography has already made them feel like dusty terminology.  Eventually, painting, as outlandish as it may sound, will be dictated by what we think and imagine rather than what we can physically execute. We’re moving more and more towards a world where the ground floor to creating great artwork is being lowered through technology, and every facet of life is manipulated and designed.  Even chest hair.

It’s amazing how frightened artists can be of their “fields” converging with technology. People lambasted the latest Final Cut Pro video editing software for “dumbing down pro features,” but more so – it was threatening. It enabled mere rookies to access very intuitive and easy-to-use controls and to execute things which would have been incredibly complicated mere years ago. We have hipsters who call themselves “purists” for everything. I am a painter who uses a Wacom stylus. A person who digitally paints with only a mouse looks down on the stylus because it’s “easier.” People who do any digital painting are looked down on by digital photographers who are looked down on by manual photographers who are looked down on by traditional painters who are looked down on by writers, who are looked down on by writers with typewriters who are looked down on by writers with pens who are looked down on by writers with feathers and ink, all of whom are looked down on by street artists because everything sucks if it doesn’t have an obvious political message and is plastered over a public wall.  All of whom, of course, are looked down on by commercial artists.

It’s not that technology gets rid of previous mediums, it builds upon them, and I think it’s incredibly important that this continues because “art” has just about the loosest definition of any word. We literally live in a world where our own blood and excrement can belong in a museum if it’s wrapped in a sound bite explaining its purported depth and profundity.  Without new tools and techniques driving creativity in new generations, we will continue to just point to anything and declare it as high art.

When I paint digitally, I am granted an enormous amount of control. CTRL+Z can wipe away my mistakes, thousands of settings, sliders, rulers, guides, layers, and paths can assist in my ability to manipulate the medium. However, despite the thousands of tools available, I limit myself to only a few, simply because those are the ones that express my techniques and education in traditional painting. The only times I hit “undo” is when I smack my entire face into my keyboard from looking at YouTube comments, everything else I consider to be mistakes worth working over. It builds character (as every dad ever would say). I’m not trying to make my life harder by limiting myself.  After all, the difficulty of your medium doesn’t elevate it.  But I believe that as art and technology get all up inside one another, it’s important to be wary of the visual gimmick babies which rise up along the way.

3D, HDR, Tilt-shift, multiple-exposure, lens flare… these are some buzzwords which mostly pertain to the worlds of photography and video, but they run in parallel with illustration. Many artists look for visual hooks, something that brings individuation or “edge” to their work. It’s marketable, I’ll give it that, but it’s also transient when your style is no more than a fashion trend. In college, I had a teacher who told me something along the lines of: “Sam, design trends, fads, and gimmicks come and go, realism/classicism and the genres bent off of it won’t always be popular, they won’t always sell well, but they have always and likely will always be here to stay.” This stuck with me – not just on the illustrative plane, but looking at the photographers I’ve been able to work with, they ride down a similar path, working within the framework of reality. Bending the rules, but not breaking them just to find a “different” gimmick.

I was skeptical about continuing down this road. After all, most painters are taught realism initially and then they push into other styles. “Why would someone hire me to paint their portrait when they could get someone to take a picture that is quicker, more accurate, and possibly less expensive?” I thought. But in the two years I’ve been working, I’ve realized that speed, accuracy, and cost are shockingly relative terms.

Speed
A commissioned portrait typically takes at least 20 hours for me. Far more than it takes for someone to take a photo and edit it. However, I don’t require advanced lighting setups, assistants, hair and make-up, a specific location, expensive equipment, and taking thousands of photos to eventually select just one. A recent client, Donald Glover, had a packed schedule, as most celebrities do — I sidestepped this and met him out on the town.  I simply pulled him aside for 5 minutes, and snapped a few reference pictures from different angles in the dim light of the club with an entry-level DSLR.  And that was the extent of time I required of him or anyone else — the rest was Whisky. It still took many hours to paint, but the time and resources didn’t come from the client.

Accuracy
I work hard to try to capture a decent likeness. It’s no photograph, but with my limitations in technical ability at this stage in my life, I try to make up for in treatment and character. There’s no tutorial for these things, just practice. Where capturing individual pores and exact anatomy fall short, painting allows flexibility in accuracy. When I get reference, the lighting is irrelevant as the reference is to understand the form. I shoot around the figure rather than from one angle, so that I can learn their anatomy and how light hits it. Learning each person as a three dimensional entity enables client direction like “I’d like my eyes less happy.” Vague? Not really. When we smile, every muscle in our face adjusts slightly. Making eyes less happy involves being able to re-paint eye-lids, eye-brows, adjusting forehead crinkles, lowering cheeks, uncurling lips, and dozens of other tiny nuances. If my reference is of someone with their mouth open, and they want it closed, it takes some thinking.  But it can be done. The detachment from direct realism, that wiggle-room freed up by color treatment, loose brushstrokes, and texture, lets things like this flow naturally in a painting environment, while in photo manipulation/re-touching, such a thing can easily be botched and unrealistic.

Cost
Much like the relative displacement of time, cost works similarly. I charge more for a single image than most traditional commercial photographers (at my level of exposure) would, but people pay for the imagery and the rights, nothing else. There is no division or expenditures for location, production, sets, equipment, assistants, retouchers, etc. If someone wants the Sahara desert, some velociraptors, and spaceships in the background, painters get to just make those things up. It requires only one person’s time and energy, rather than the coordination of entire teams and sets.  As you can imagine, the economics of one person over many can be vastly different.

Connection
All of the pros and cons of the aforementioned mediums and technologies meet at the same place with the same question: How do you share them with the world? Well, since you’re reading this, you are probably familiar with The Internet. The Internet is the single most powerful tool available to the public. It wasn’t always that way, but right now, I can get on my computer, in any area of the world with a connection, and I can share my work, my thoughts, news, ideas, and process with anyone who cares to listen. I can put a single image online and track it as it virally trickles and booms across various websites – finding its way into millions of eyeballs.

I don’t believe that anyone with an Internet connection can find success, but I do believe that the barriers which separate someone who wants it and who can have it are largely diminished by the web. Anyone who is willing to treat their craft like they’re a doctor or a lawyer, putting in exhaustive hours like their creative job matters just as much as any other, I believe they can find success.  I firmly believe that we live in a time where actual effort met with a basic understanding of social media can sustain us. There are always excuses. Timing, connections, and luck are words people love to throw around for reasons why they haven’t found a footing. With the Web at your finger-tips, those factors are greatly reduced. It’s you, your work, your commitment to improving it, and the power to share it. It’s not an instantaneous process nor one that fits into quick-fix culture, but it’s one where your name can be found and explode through “likes” and “retweets” instead of yearly contests/awards and knowing just the right people.

Closure
We live in a digital renaissance that many disregard because of gossip blogs and cat .gifs. However, technology has allowed generations, new and old, to find ways to create fresh and exciting things from both revolutionary and evolutionary methodologies, and share them in unprecedented ways. Within a single piece of software, I have infinite canvases, brushes, colors, and layers. Nothing has to dry. Nothing has to be coated or prepped. When I pick up my stylus, I waste no time on the monotony of tertiary painting elements — they have been synthesized and streamlined into nearly instantaneous aspects of my work flow allowing me to jump in and create.

There are simple advantages of digital mediums which aren’t up for debate, but within every fiber of the toolset, the tablet, and the software, lies a foundation built by traditional painters, and for that reason, it’s important to not look back at what came before as obsolete. Technology and art are converging — what we can make, and how we make it are expanding at a rapid pace — but old mediums aren’t simply dying.

Why? Because not everything old is broken. I can’t achieve the smell, texture, and true organic nature of oil paint. No amount of slapped-on filters can make a digital photo look like a true tintype. No preset font looks quite like hand-written pen and ink calligraphy. That’s not permanent. Eventually, consumer printers will be able to print the three dimensional depth and texture maps along with a painting. Fully simulated chemicals and physics will enable digital ink to bleed and flow naturally while photos become instantaneously exposed and treated as if in a real dark room. These things aren’t unrealistic, they’re ideas built on readily-available technologies.

Do new mediums carry a stigma? Of course. Very rarely does the digital world find its way into the realms of “high art”, but it is trickling in as digital artists develop new ways to assign pseudo-symbolism to what we do.

Perhaps there’s no grand symbolism to my work to elevate it to the elusive “high art” status, I can’t say there are any deep emotions or bursting geysers of self-expression, and my concepts are typically one-note and surface-level… but to say why I make things in this way with this medium for one simple reason:

I’m obsessed with the future and will likely spend my life hurdling towards it, always looking over my shoulder.

You can see more of Sam’s work at SamSpratt.com, keep up with him on his blog, find him on Facebook, and follow him on Twitter.

Tuesday
Aug
2012
14

Want to Learn Lightroom 4? We have got you covered!!!

by Scott Kelby  |  40 Comments

Right now I’m out on tour with my “Photoshop for Photographers” live full-day seminar, and since I’m showing Photoshop all day, I usually have a few folks ask, “Do you guys do any training on Lightroom?” I love when someone asks that because we actually offer an insane amount of Lightroom 4 training, and a lot of different ways to learn — 15 in fact, so here’s a quick list of what we do for photographers who really want to learn Lightroom 4:

Spoiler Alert: There’s a BIG new one coming — that’s #16 down below, but read the other 15 first).

(1) Our Lightroom magazine within a magazine!
In every issue of Photoshop User magazine (the monthly print magazine for members of the National Assn. of Photoshop Professionas [NAPP] and found on newsstands), we have an entire section of the magazine (kind of magazine within a magazine) that focuses just on Lightroom 4 with tutorials features, articles, and tips. Here’s the link for info on NAPP (you get a Photoshop User magazine subscription as part of your annual membership)

(2) We produce the free “Lightroom Killer Tips,” podcast
It’s hosted by Matt Kloskowski. You can watch it on our site (here’s the link) or subscribe to it free on iTunes.

(3) The Lightroom Killer Tips Blog 
Matt also pens the incredibly popular “Lightroom Killer Tips” blog for us, where he posts a ton of  Lightroom 4 tips, techniques, topics, plus loads of his free Lightroom Presets (that’s right—awesome free presets. In fact, some of the presets that Matt created are actually included by Adobe in the Lightroom presets that come preinstalled in Lightroom 4).

(4) The Lightroom 4 Tour Live! 
At Kelby Training we produce a nationwide tour that Matt is teaching live in cities across the country. Thousands of people have been turned on to Lightroom, and an amazing workflow, through this tour already. His next stops are:  Seattle, St. Louis, Kansas City and Orlando. Here’s the link to see when it’s coming near you.

(5) “The Lightroom 4 Book for Digital Photographers”
Since it’s first release (for Lightroom 1) it’s been the #1 bestselling book on the topic and one of my bestselling books ever! Here’s a link to it on Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.com. It’s around $28 bucks.

(6) The Latest Lightroom Info is here on my blog
I spend about 80% of my time in Lightroom, so it’s not surprising that Lightroom is a big topic right here on blog. I share everything from tips and techniques to my thoughts on how Lightroom is evolving and I help to act as your representative, as your voice and mouthpiece to Adobe’s own Lightroom team on the features you need next.

(7) We teach Lightroom on D-Town TV
We produce this wildly popular, free weekly show for DSLR shooters (hosted by RC Concepcion and Larry Becker), and since it’s a show for DSLR shooters, we cover some post production, too, so we include tutorials on Lightroom every chance we get (It’s in it’s 6th season now. You can watch back episodes free, and you’ll see lots of Lightroom). Here’s that link.

(8) Learn Lightroom 4 at the Photoshop World Conference & Expo
That’s right—we have a special Lightroom training track all unto itself at the Photoshop World Conference & Expo that runs the entire conference, with sessions taught by the leading experts on Lightroom, every day–all day (we joke that you can go to Photoshop World, do the Lightroom conference tracks, and never take a single Photoshop class. That’s awesome!). Join us next month in Vegas for this three-day Lightroom love fest (Here’s a link to check out the Lightroom classes offered).

(9) Our Free Lightroom Learning Centers
When a new version of Lightroom comes out, we launch an extensive free online Learning Center, with individual videos on all the new features, along with video interviews with Adobe’s Lightroom product managers, and loads more information on the new release than you’ll find anywhere. You can still visit our Lightroom 3 Learning Center right here.

(10) We teach Lightroom Online at KelbyTraining.com
We have literally hours of Lightroom training available to subscribers to our online training segment, with classes on everything from how to properly back-up your Lightroom catalog and images, to classes on Sharpening in Lightroom, and Lightroom for the Web, plus our three-part “Lightroom In Depth” classes from Matt. Here’s the link.

(11) We have Lightroom Training DVDs
We know not everybody likes to learn live, or online, which is why we offer Lightroom training DVDs, and they’re still incredibly popular (especially titles like our “Lightroom 4 Power Session” which is designed to bring people who upgrade from earlier versions of Lightroom up to speed fast on Lightroom 4).

(12) Lightroom Tutorials on Photoshop User TV
In just about every free weekly episode ofPhotoshop User TV, we feature either a Lightroom tip, or a full feature tutorial during the show, because like I said earlier, it’s actually called “Photoshop” Lightroom. It’s free. Every week.Here’s the link.

(13) Our Lightroom Training Apps
One of our most popular Apps (for the iPad) is our “Lightroom Crash Course” (from none other than own own Matt Kloskowski (I have to admit, it’s awesome having one of the absolutely world’s best Lightroom trainers working for us), and it’s only $10. It rocks!

(14) Lightroom Training on the NAPP-Member Site
Another place where we do a lot of Lightroom training is on the NAPP Member’s site. We have both videos and written tutorials, and we’re about to undergo our most expansive Lightroom training initiative there ever. Plus, we have a Lightroom Help Desk where you can get your questions answered directly, one-on-one. Here’s the link with info on joining NAPP.

(15) 100 Ways Lightroom Kicks The Bridge and Camera Raw’s A$%!!!!
To help photographers out there that ask, “I have the Bridge and Camera Raw, do I really need Lightroom?” Matt and I created a series of 100 short video clips (60-seconds or less) ) called (and I’m not making this up): 100 Ways Lightroom Kicks The Bridge and Camera Raw’s A$%!!!!  It surprises a lot of people because when you see the side-by-side comparison, you totally “get it” and realize there really is no comparison. Here’s the link.

(16) We’re getting  ready to launch a new magazine just for Lightroom!
It’s called Lightroom User” magazine, and it will be a tablet-based magazine in the same size and format as our popular “Light it Magazine” (for hot shoe and studio flash), and it will be 100% dedicated to teaching you Lightroom 4 (and future versions). The magazine is in production now, and once it launches I’ll be sure to let you guys know right here on the blog.

Whew!!! That’s a bunch of Lightroom training!!!

I hope some of you find that helpful, and that maybe you found out about some other ways we’re supporting the education of Lightroom in the community.

Thanks for giving me an opportunity to share all this with you, and I hope you’ll check at least some of it out — I promise it will be a big help to you on your Lightroom 4 journey. :)

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