Here’s some quick news:

  • I ran across this blog this past week, and I just really found the photography interesting. It’s called “The Landscapist” but it’s not your typical landscape photography site, and I particularly liked their vision statement, which is, “Photography that aims at being true, not at being beautiful, because what is true most often is beautiful.” There’s just something about their stuff I really like. Give it a look-see right here.
  • If you want to learn more about Kevin Connor, who as you read in the previous post is being inducted into the Photoshop Hall of Fame next week, he was interviewed last week on the Inside Digital Photo Radio podcast, and Kevin has some insightful comments on the future of digital imaging. You can listen to the interview online by clicking here.
  • Yesterday Jason posted a comment here on the blog, asking about my personal workflow. His question was:”…I am wondering whether you use both Lightroom and PS for workflow, or if you find yourself using one more than the other for basic workflow? I realize this may be putting you in something of a quandry as much of your support comes from “The Adobe Mothership” and you don’t want to alienate one product line over another equally deserving one, so feel free to email rather than post a response…”Jason; I’m happy to share my workflow (after all, that’s my job). I do the bulk of my work now in Lightroom, including processing my Raw images there, and I would say I probably spend 70% of my time there. I do nearly all my printing in Lightroom because personally I think it kicks Photoshop CS3′s butt when it comes to printing for photographers.The other 30% of the time I spend in Photoshop CS3 doing finishing work. Some photos never make their way to Photoshop CS3 at all, and my entire workflow for those is within Lightroom, but there are so many things that you need Photoshop for, that I jump back and forth as needed. So, in short, my digital photography workflow uses Lightroom and Photoshop CS3 together (I can’t imagine using either alone anymore–they work best as a team), and I know some people at Adobe will cringe, but I rarely use the CS3 Bridge at all.

    Once I started using Lightroom, I looked at the Bridge differently; I use it when I need to quickly find one or two images from a shoot (let’s say I went out shooting, and I need to find one image to quickly email to an editor—that’s when I’ll pop open the Bridge, or if I need to find an image on my drive and I don’t know which folder it’s in; then I’ll use the Bridge).

    I think the Bridge is still very useful for graphic and Web designers, and people using the entire Creative Suite, but for photographers, I think Lightroom just blows it away (and then some). There you have it–I hope that helps. :)

That’s it for this Tuesday. Tomorrow I’m on my way to Chicago for my one-day Lightroom Live Tour on Thursday. If you’re coming to the event and you’re a reader of my blog–make sure you stop me and say “hi.” Have a good one.