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Photoshop World Vegas starts tomorrow and I’m so excited! I just can’t hide it! It’s me, Dave Williams, here for #TravelTuesday with Dave at ScottKelby.com and this week I’m writing from high above the Atlantic Ocean on my way from London to Vegas (baby) where PSW is about to kick off!

Photoshop World is a gathering of photographers, designers, and all manner of creatives involved in digital imagery from around our beautiful planet, coming together under one roof to share, learn and connect. There are classes, live shoots, events, workshops, and late night sessions designed to educate and inspire, and it’s a great setting to network with other like-minded, awesome individuals, and to grow through investing in the creativity we love.

Kirk marsh, matt divine, mark Rodriguez, brad Moore, Gilmar smith, Scott Kelby, Dave Williams, jr Maddox, Larry Becker, Doug young, Kaylee Greer, dalton Hamm, group shot selfie at photoshop world conference east Orlando

Sponsored by Adobe and hosted by KelbyOne, the conference is an amazing 3 days and well worth attending. I’ve been there for a few years now and learned so much from the instructors, and this time I’m excited to say that I’m one of the instructors too. I’ll be teaching my Top Ten Tips to Help You Create Captivating Travel Images on Thursday afternoon, and I’d love to see you there. You can still get day tickets or full conference passes at PhotoshopWorld.com

Photoshop World is a great place to learn, and learning is important in photography. It boosts our confidence, enlightens us to things we didn’t know (or couldn’t quite put our finger on,) and in turn that gives us happiness and satisfaction. There are various ways to learn, we all know this, but one particular method of learning that comes off the back of Photoshop World is copying. We all look up to people and we mimic those people, looking to them for guidance and taking note of their actions. It’s a good way to learn, we all do it, and it’s particular prevalent at Photoshop World and in the KelbyOne community. The thing about Photoshop World that takes it up a notch is being able to speak to the photographers we admire – asking questions, offering opinions, debating, and then taking new, fresh knowledge and ideas away and taking ownership of the new work we do, applying all that we have learned and working hard at new outcomes.

Photoshop World is great for all methods of learning – you can sit back and listen, you can get involved and jump in, participate in activities, and even go to Midnight Madness and get involved in the quiz and the games (and eat the donuts!)

I personally can’t wait to get there and I’ll be sad to leave, and if you aren’t going you certainly should be. I’ll be hanging out in the lounge area and it would be great to meet you!

Much love

Dave

#TravelTuesday with Dave has come around again, you lucky, lucky people!

I’ve just returned home from a trip to Valensole in Provence, France, where I’ve been shooting lavender, sunflowers, mountains, and all manner of French fancies. I hope you were following along on my usual Instagram Story but if you weren’t, here’s a little glimpse at what I was doing: –

I have a tiny, itsy-bitsy secret…. The lavender season was pretty much over and there were just a few fields of lavender left un-harvested! What this means for you isn’t much, but what it means for me is a fair amount of Photoshop action.

In other news, my Sunrise Challenge starts today! I’ve teamed up with KelbyOne, Drobo, Platypod, Litra, and BlackRapid, and they’ve very kindly donated some amazing prizes which are up for grabs to you lucky people! In fact, the total prize haul is worth in excess of $1,000!!!!

For your chance to win check out the full details right here, but basically I want you to set your alarm clock bright and early and go shoot a sunrise. Here’s why: –

Sunrise and sunset are the best times of day to go and make photos. There’s a golden hour while the sun’s up, and a blue hour while the sun’s below the horizon. Take a look around and notice how many of the awesome landscape photos you see in everyday life are taken at sunrise and sunset. The thing is though, sunrise totally beats sunset! Sunrise is a magical time of day where the world around you is just waking up. The summer sky is generally filled with haze, however at sunrise this haze tends to be absent. Sunset has colour scattered across the sky, whereas sunrise tends to focus the colour around the sun itself.

At sunset our eyes are tired from the brightness of the day, but at sunrise we are adapted to the dark and notice the colours and brightness so much more vividly. With these factoids in mind, there’s one further thing that steps sunrise up a gear over sunset – the change in view! Sunset shots are far more common than sunrise, so if we shoot sunrise we’re able to get a more unique perspective by changing our focus in the opposite direction to the more commonly seen angles of famous subjects.

On the whole we, as a species, don’t like to be up early enough to shoot sunrise. Not regularly, anyway! While it’s more ‘normal’ for us to sleep in a little and spend our energy shooting throughout the day and into sunset, the rewards of shooting a sunrise range from being set up to an awesome day ahead, through to potentially capturing the best photos we’ve ever gotten. Oh, and if you’re not so much of a people-person, their absence in at sunrise will be great for you!

Moving away from the photography, and with absolutely nothing to back this up, I swear that breathing the morning air is good for your health! Just as an added extra!

Moving back to Provence, if you ever get the opportunity to visit, take that opportunity! The vibe across most of rural France is pretty good. There’s a rustic charm and a generally laid back mood, but the past few days I’ve been exploring whilst making the launch image for the Sunrise Challenge have genuinely been amazing. I found myself racing across the countryside trying to capture as many views as possible at golden hour. To my surprise, having been immersed in views of the famous lavender fields of Valensole for the past month or so, there were barely any photographers taking advantage of the beautiful light. All day whilst driving around there were hordes of people shooting in the harsh, direct sunlight, but at dawn and dusk I found myself completely alone as if the whole plateau had been abandoned. During the days there were tourists walking the fields, but there were also couples and small groups with changes of clothing doing their ‘Instagram shoots’ in totally the wrong light. I felt like telling them to relax and come back later, but there were just too many people!

As for Valensole, there’ll be more on the story over on my blog in the next few days, but for now I urge you to get out and shoot that sunrise!

Much love

Dave

It’s #TravelTuesday again! I’m Dave Williams and I’m here every week at ScottKelby.com, at your service!

Today I’m very tired! I’ve just returned from a tip to Norway where I travelled some 1,600 miles in just a few days, exploring the landscape and shooting some awesome sights. I was taking over the KelbyOne Instagram account while I was there and showing the lovely KelbyOne community what I was up to every step of the way. It’s from this that I’m taking inspiration for today’s post.

There’s an American photographer born 1898 in Germany, shooting and documenting World War II before becoming a staff photographer for Life Magazine. The reason I’m telling you this is because he once came out with a cracker of a line: –

“It is more important to click with people than to click the shutter.”

So, when I was in Norway one of the locations on my bucket list was Kannasteinen, sometimes referred to by us English speakers as the mushroom rock, which appears to be a precariously balanced boulder atop a thin shaft on the coastline of Maløy. I had driven a very, very long way to get to this spot and get this shot: –

But it’s more about the experience I had whilst I was there that I laid down that quote. I wasn’t the only photographer at this incredibly remote location. I bumped into Espen who, like me, had just bought a Nikon Z6, and we got chatting (with his perfect English rather than my terrible Norwegian) and in the Instagram takeover I included a short video of the two of us chatting, explain the importance of making friends and the power of local knowledge in your research of photographing locations.

As well as discussing our cameras we swapped lenses to get more variety of shots, we talked about techniques and traded secrets, and we discussed other locations to shoot. Espen is from the Lofoten Islands way up in the north, which is an absolutely beautiful part of Norway, and he’d dragged his caravan all the way down some 400 miles to this rock. If there are any geologists reading this, by the way, I have some questions for you!

Well here’s the point: – When you’re researching and planning, it continues well into the trip until the point you actually leave. Plans need to be dynamic enough to adapt to the unexpected, but also they can be flexible enough that when you meet a local person (or any person for that matter) you can make a new friend and learn from one another, like Espen and I did while we waited for sunset at Kannesteinen.

There are ways to learn from one another in the KelbyOne community, both from the instructors and from other members, and plenty more ways to network and share our skills and experiences as well. To learn more about this, check out my new class on KelbyOne.com – How to Prepare For Your Travel Photography Adventure.

This week I’m off to France, so next week I’ll have more stories to share with you, and as always you can follow along on my social media.

Much love

Dave

Happy #TravelTuesday one and all! I’m Dave Williams, and I’m here today (and every Tuesday) with some photography wisdom for you. This week, I’m in Croatia! I arrived a couple of days ago and, so far, I’ve also hopped some borders and checked out Bosnia, Herzegovina, and Montenegro. If you were wondering—they’re beautiful!

I caught sunrise in Mostar, Bosnia, and framed up a lovely series of shots down the Neretva River of the town’s famous bridge. Now, I arrived before sunrise and caught the sun coming up over the bridge, then I drove half an hour down the road to Blagaj Tekija, a monastery on a beautiful pool next to a cliff edge, built by Dervish monks in the 16th Century. The reason I’m telling you this is to point out something that photographers don’t necessarily always consider when shooting sunrise and sunset situations, and that thing is this: –

The sunrise and sunset times will vary if you’re in mountains! Yes, simple, right? My pro tip for you if you don’t know the actual sunset time is to hold your clenched fist out, thumb up, to the horizon. Because of the beautiful piece of nature that is the golden equation, the God number, the divine proportion, whatever else you want to call it, the sun will sink approximately the distance your fist occupies every hour. Therefore if the sun is one fist’s height above the mountain next to you, you have about an hour until sunset!

(That’s a top-secret pro tip, don’t tell anyone!)

So, although it may seem simple, it may not actually be considered. Mountains and other such high terrain affect the sunrise and sunset, which is something I took full advantage of in Bosnia and Herzegovina by having two sunrises!

If you were wondering, sunrise totally beats sunset! That time of day is calm, relaxed, the rest of the world hasn’t woken up yet, there’s no traffic to get where you’re going, when you get there you can always find a place to park, and the light is amazing. It’s just all-around better!

Much love

Dave

It’s #TravelTuesday with Dave! I’m Dave Williams and I’m here every Tuesday with something for you from the world of Photoshop, Photography, Travel, or life, and today was never going to be the exception! This past Saturday I had the pleasure of hooking up with The Kelby’s in my home town, London, England. Scott and his son, Jordan, were over in Europe on a trip and we went on a little jaunt to Greenwich in South East London, and this is the inspiration for today’s post.

Travel photography doesn’t actually require travel! Big news, right? Well here’s why: – the whole point behind travel photography is to make the viewer want to be there, in the photo, seeing the sights, smelling the smells, and feeling the feels. It doesn’t mean you, the photographer, have to be in another country, rather it means the viewer needs to be seeing a place with which they aren’t familiar or where they want to go. Whatever the underlying style, be it landscape, architecture, lifestyle, portraits, so long as the image makes the viewer want to be in the place depicted you’re succeeding as a travel photographer.

From this we know that travel photography can be a little closer to home for us, so that’s exactly what I did with Scott and Jordan. We went to Greenwich to shoot travel – architecture in this instance, but travel nonetheless. The location is just down the road from me, thousands of miles from Scott and Jordan, but regardless of distance it’s travel in that we wanted to show the location in its best light and, from our photos, make people want to be there. Well, Scott and I did. Jordan maybe not so much, but it seemed he was having a good time learning that the paint on the walls is probably older than the USA!

As Scott explained here yesterday, he was here to be a tourist. He wanted to get some shots checked off the list. For me the little exploration mission was travel photography, but it wasn’t travel. I hadn’t actually gone anywhere. It hit the point home that travel photography isn’t necessarily about the photographer travelling, rather it’s about everything else I’ve mentioned. We had a good look around at Greenwich before heading back to central London: –

What a pleasure it was to take Scott and Jordan on tour in London, and next week I’ll be writing from KelbyOne where I’ll be recording some classes. Show me your travel photography and keep up with mine on Instagram!

Much love

Dave

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