Posts By Brad Moore

Brad here, blogging from NYC with all the latest pimpy stuff... Matt Kloskowski just finished the update to his very popular Layers: The Complete Guide to Photoshop's Most Powerful Features book, and it's now available for pre-order! He's completely updated it for Photoshop CS5, plus added a whole new chapter!  And, if you pre-order it, you'll receive an autographed copy!  It's only $35.99 (NAPP members get it for $26.99), so order your copy here! Speaking of Matt, if you're at Photo Plus Expo at the Javits Center in New York this week, make sure you stop by the Nik Software booth to see some free live training sessions from Mr. Kloskowski himself! And speaking of Photo Plus Expo, you should already know that Scott is presenting in the Manfrotto and Wacom booths tomorrow afternoon. But did you know that our buddy RC Concepcion is…

I’ll start off with a little history on me. I’m a second generation photographer. My father started the business over 30 years ago and when I was 11 years old I started going to weddings and shooting with him. I guess you can say photography is literately in my blood. I began taking photography extremely serious at the age of 19 and never looked back. As I grew our business grew. Now ten years later at the age of 29 I’m still doing what I love. I’ve managed to keep our old photography business very young and fresh. My father who I refer to on my blog as “Big Joe” is still shooting weddings too. I don’t like to call myself a “wedding photographer” but rather a photographer who happens to photograph people in love. Maybe it sounds sappy or corny but that's what…

Dave Cross and Corey Barker square off during Photoshop Wars in the Dell booth at Photoshop World Las Vegas 2010. Hey gang, Brad here with the news for this week: TOMORROW is the LIVE NAPP webcast featuring Dave Cross and Corey Barker sponsored by Dell!  They'll be taking the stage to present a bevy (yes, bevy) of their coolest Photoshop Tips & Tricks, plus it's open to the public, plus plus they're giving away FREE prizes! So register now for your chance to win, then tune in tomorrow at NOON Eastern on that same page. Matt Kloskowski will be bringing the Photoshop for Digital Photographers seminar to the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle on November 18! You can get all the details and sign up right here. Speaking of Matt, episode 56 of DTown TV with he and Scott Kelby will be going up…

My name is John McWade. Because this is my first post, here’s a quick history.

I’m a designer, not a photographer. Early in 1985, I was the first person in the world to lay down my T-square and become a full-time “desktop publisher.” That meant that I was doing my design work entirely on a computer — a 9″-screen Macintosh — with a test version of Aldus PageMaker.

I’d been at it for months when, that summer in New York, Apple rolled out its “Macintosh Office,” a networked suite consisting of the Apple LaserWriter, Adobe PostScript, and Aldus PageMaker. All three were revolutionary. The press, impressed, said, “Yeah, this looks good, but is anyone actually using it?” To which Apple said, “Well, there’s this guy out in California . . .”

And my phone started to ring.

Things have not been the same since.

It took only five years for desktop publishing to democratize design. Its early adopters, with exceptions, were not designers. They were writers, editors, marketers and others who had design to do — newsletters, brochures, business stationery, whatever — but lacked the time, budget, or need for a professional.

Most had an affinity for design, too. But most did not have the skills.

Books and periodicals taught point and click. How to draw a curve, make a shadow, put a glow on something. This was helpful. They called it design, but it wasn’t. It was effects.

No one outside of school was teaching design. Typography. Page layout. The art of making a visual message beautifully and simply and clearly.

So we jumped in. We launched a small magazine titled Before & After, How to design cool stuff in January, 1990, to help the novice — the non-design professional — with graphic design. It was an immediate hit.

I’ve been at it ever since. In print, in books, online, in video (just starting this), and in the occasional live class. I love my work. The surprise has been that our little five-year project would turn into a career that continues to this day.

Brad asked if I’d do a post for photographers.

From a designer’s standpoint, the great thing about being a photographer is that you have great images to work with. So how about how to get a photo and type to coexist in the same small space, like on a business card? There’s a universal way to do it, which I’ll show you here, and once you have it down, you can elaborate pretty easily if you want.


(Above) Jayne Kettner’s business card had a clip-arty logo, a slogan, a swashy, calligraphic signature, and her business information, all scattered into various corners and places. This is common, and there are several problems with it. One is the scattering, which puts similar kinds of information in different places, with nothing to connect it. Two is the visual complexity; that is, the unnecessary tangle of lines. Three is that we can’t see her photos; her biggest asset is absent.

Here’s how to fix it.

Hey everyone, Brad here with the latest news: Kelby TV is running a free photo contest from now until October 31, sponsored by Dell and Intel! The winner will receive a brand new Dell Precision M6500 laptop (the same laptop used in Photoshop Wars at Photoshop World)! Visit for all the details. (Voting is open to everyone, submissions open to U.S. residents) Tomorrow is the day, London! Hundreds of photographers have already signed up for Scott's Photoshop for Digital Photographers seminar in Islington tomorrow, but you can still show up and register at the door. If you can't make it to the seminar in London, Matt Kloskowski will be bringing the same seminar to the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle on November 18! You can get all the details and sign up right here. Remember Scott's report from Moab where he photographed the mountain biker…

I shot my first wedding in October 2006.  Back then, I simply hoped for the best.  Hoped the wedding wasn't delayed, hoped the family members remained nearby for formal pictures, and hoped I received a timeline for the day in advance.  I'll never forget the terror of standing outside--in a garden--after my first wedding on a pitch-black night for the family formal pictures.  It was so dark I couldn't get my camera to focus.  I actually resorted to my assistant holding a flashlight just to provide enough light to get my camera to fire. I redefined awesome. After that experience, I realized how important it was for me to address a wedding day timeline in advance.  Namely, using my experience (you know, all ONE wedding I had tucked under my belt) to best prepare my clients for an optimal photography experience. This meant discussing…