Posts By Brad Moore

http://youtu.be/6nYnTYhQNqE

Photoshop User TV
Have you watched the latest episode of Photoshop User TV? You might want to if you haven’t, considering it might be the only episode that’s ever featured an Academy Award nominee!

Aaron Blaise, who animated characters for movies like The Lion King, Aladdin, Beauty and the Beast, and directed Brother Bear (which landed him the Oscar nomination), stopped by to show how he develops a character for the screen from sketch to finished image. He wowed Corey and Pete on set, and is wowing viewers as well!

KelbyTraining.com
Trying to figure out how to work your iPad into your photography workflow? Or maybe you want to create your own iPad app… Terry White’s latest classes on KelbyTraining.com will help you figure out how to do both of these!

In Creating an iPad app in InDesign, Terry walks you through the surprisingly easy process of creating your very own iPad app from start to finish, including submitting it to the iTunes store!

Then, in Using the iPad in Your Photography Workflow, Terry shows you all the tools and apps he uses to shoot tethered, edit photos, get model releases, show his portfolio, and more!

Leave a comment for your chance to win a 1-month subscription to KelbyTraining.com.

Kelby Training Live
There are only a couple of chances left to catch Kelby Training Live seminars this year, so make sure you take advantage of these two opportunities:

Lightroom 4 Live with Matt Kloskowski
Dec 10 – San Diego

One Light, Two Light with Joe McNally
Dec 17 – Houston

Leave a comment for your chance to win a free ticket to one of these events!

Winners
TAP! 2013 Conference Ticket
– Martin G.

Lightroom 4 Live
– Dianne A

1-Month KelbyTraining.com Subscription 
– Taz

I’m honored to be back here for a second time as Scott’s guest blogger. Like my last post, I’m going to share some non-technical thoughts because it’s too easy to get lost in gear and megapixels.

It’s hard to believe I’ve been a professional photographer for as long as I have, but here are a few things I’ve learned along the way.

People Still Love Prints

Technology is awesome. I sleep with my iPhone next to my bed and am at my computer within minutes of waking up. Photos look great on the iPad and my online portfolio is an important marketing tool.

But physical prints are still king.

When is the last time you held one of your favorite images in your hands, printed on 11X14 heavyweight matte paper? Try it. Have a real print made, frame it, and hang it on the wall. It feels good and looks good.

I’ve created a modern business by selling prints. I tour with a number of bands (most recently Bon Jovi), and offer officially licensed prints through my company TourPhotographer.com. It’s a fun gig, makes money, and fans seem to enjoy getting real prints.


Fans can buy various sizes of my 2011 image of Jon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora in Istanbul.

Prints have an impact that screen images just don’t have. You can scroll through hundreds of photos in a Facebook web gallery and they’re gone in a flash. But go through a box of mounted prints, and you’ll instinctively handle the artwork more carefully.

After I shoot a job, I try my best to make a big print of my best image, sign it, and mail it to the PR person, manager, subject, etc. Sometimes I actually get a call or email back thanking me for sending it, and the next time I see them, they remember me.

How often does that happen from a web gallery?

There Is More To Being A Professional Photographer Than Just Making Great Images

Photographers are everywhere. Digital cameras, autofocus, and Instagram have made it simple for anyone to make “decent” images.

But how many people do you know who are full-time, working professional photographers? There aren’t that many of us.

Why?

Because “point, click, and share” just isn’t enough.

I was fortunate to begin my career nearly 25 years ago, before technology lowered the entry barrier to the profession. What I learned is that “taking the picture” is only about 10% of the job.

There is so much more that goes into making a successful photography business: Marketing, promotion, invoicing, managing and archiving your image library, backups, balancing the books, buying and testing new gear, commercial insurance and workman’s comp, pre- and post-production, taxes, and more.

Of course, having the right gear for the job is important as well.


Here’s the gear I used at SuperBowl XLVI. If I missed a shot, I couldn’t ask the players to do it again.

Your Uncle Bob may have a shiny new DSLR, but would you trust him to capture a once-in-a-lifetime event like your wedding? What happens when his only battery dies or he’s in the bathroom during the cake cutting?

Just because you occasionally make a good photo doesn’t mean you should quit your day job.

Relationships Are Everything

People hire photographers that they know and like. It’s rare, if ever, that you’ll send in a portfolio or web link cold and get a gig. It just doesn’t happen that way.

If I go back far enough, I can trace most of my best jobs back to friends from college. You never know how it will happen: that guy was friends with this guy, I did a job for his sister and met this person at the gig, and ten years later he works at a big ad agency. Fast forward another ten years and, well, you get the point.

That doesn’t mean you don’t have to do the work. Once you get in the door, you still need to do a great job or they won’t hire you back or recommend you to anyone else.

I recently photographed my fifth Olympic Games, but it was my first time working for NBC. A few months later, when they put together a telethon to raise money for Hurricane Sandy relief, I called my contact at the network so I could do my part to help the storm victims. The next day, I found myself backstage shooting portraits of some of the artists before the show.


I photographed Jon Bon Jovi, Jon Stewart, Steven Tyler, Tina Fey, Whoopi Goldberg, Billy Joel, and others at the telethon.

I donated all of my profit from print sales of these images to the Red Cross. You can see them all at TourPhotographer.com.

Don’t burn any bridges. You never know when you’ll have to cross them.

—-

Those are just a few of the important things I’ve learned over the years. Photography is a service business and, like any other, it’s important to be professional, valuable, and memorable. Treat your clients well and hopefully they’ll keep coming back for more.

You can see more of David’s work at DavidBergman.net and TourPhotographer.com, and follow him on Twitter and Facebook

Our friends at LensProToGo just announced the release of their free iOS app, which allows you to browse and order equipment quickly and easily right from your iPhone!

The app adds two new features not yet available on the website to make the rental process easier and more efficient. Users can mark select gear as a “Favorite” while browsing over 400 items by brand (featuring an up to date line up from both Canon and Nikon) or type.  Favorite items are always quickly accessible in the “Favorites” view so a renter can immediately select gear from their personally created list. Additionally, experienced users will benefit from the new “Quick Add” icon which allows them to add multiple items to their cart instantly, even from their Favorites list, without viewing the items detail page.

 

If users do want to learn more about a piece of equipment, the app's item detail page provides photos, descriptions, technical specifications, suggested accessories and even a related item for comparison. Because LensProToGo is staffed entirely by working professional photographers and DSLR filmmakers, their expertise is essential to providing these relevant suggestions.  The app also provides links to camera manuals for photographers to view while in the field or on the go. Additionally, customers can access LensProToGo's social media accounts and blog, as well as find directions to the store.

 

Paul Friedman, owner of LensProToGo, and his team wanted to make it easier, faster and more convenient for photographers and filmmakers to get the gear they need no matter where they are. Whether they are on location, waiting in line at the grocery store, or on the side of a mountain, renting gear is now just a few taps away. From a development standpoint, they wanted to focus on efficiency. As photographers and filmmakers, he and his team understand just how precious time can be.

The new app can be downloaded from the App Store by searching "LensProToGo" or by clicking right here.

You can also check out the LensProToGo blog, follow them on Twitter, like them on Facebook.

http://youtu.be/iU3ujgNszN8

Light It. Shoot It. Retouch It. – On A Budget with Hot Shoe Flash
If you’re a photographer who is looking to start using flash but don’t know where to start, Scott Kelby has you covered in his latest KelbyTraining.com class, Light It. Shoot It. Retouch It. – On A Budget with Hot Shoe Flash! And if you know a photographer who fits this description, this class provides a great gear guide that could provide some affordable gift ideas.

Leave a comment for your chance to win a 1-Month KelbyTraining.com subscription!

Kelby Training Live Seminars
Check out these upcoming seminars, and leave a comment for your chance to win a free ticket!

Photoshop CS6 for Photographers LIVE with RC Concepcion
Dec 3 – Ft. Lauderdale
Dec 6 – Seattle

Lightroom 4 LIVE with Matt Kloskowski
Dec 4 – Sacramento
Dec 10 – San Diego

One Light, Two Light with Joe McNally
Dec 17 – Houston

TAP! 2013 - Technologically Advanced Publishing Conference - January 8-11, 2013 | Orlando, FL
Photographers, content creators, multi-media professionals, authors and publishers - this is your event! TAP! 2013 is a cutting-edge training conference pushing new limits in digital content creation, publishing, marketing and monetization. The who's who in this new emerging space will share case studies, talk tech and help you bring your digital publishing project to life. TAP! is designed for management and creatives alike. Sessions cover both strategy and vision as well as practical tools and techniques from content creation to final distribution.

Speakers include Scott Kelby, Guy Kawasaki, Rich Harrington, Terry White, Scott Bourne, and many more! Early bird pricing on all conference packages runs until December 7, use this code PHO12 and save an additional $150 on any registration package.

You can follow @iaepub on Twitter and like TAP! 2013 on Facebook for more info. Leave a comment for your chance to win a free 3 or 4-day ticket to this great event!

Panasonic Lumix GH3 Launch Event Tonight at Samy’s Camera
Tonight at 7:00pm, Samy’s Camera in Los Angeles is hosting a FREE launch event for the Panasonic Lumix GH3 camera featuring National Geographic photographer Ira Block! You can find out all about the event and register right here.

FREE Canon Speedlite 600EX-RT Workshop with Syl Arena
On December 19 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm, join Syl Arena for a free workshop in Hollywood! Syl will be hosting a two-hour workshop called Mastering The Speedlite 600EX-RT System at Canon Hollywood Professional Technology & Support Center on Sunset Blvd. It’s free, but registration is required. You can find out all about the workshop and sign up on Syl’s blog!

Extended Savings from B&H
Black Friday and Cyber Monday may be in the rearview mirror, but our friends at B&H still have some great sales happening! You can still save $70 on the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX5 camera, and $35 on this Wolverine SNAP14 Digital Image Converter! Capture new holiday memories with the camera, and use the digital image converter to scan your old ones so they can easily be shared with your friends and family :-) And, don’t forget, NAPP members get free shipping!

500px iPhone App
If you’re a fan and user of the crazy popular photo sharing site 500px, you can now download their free iPhone app! Use it to keep up with your favorite photographers, find new ones to follow, and leave feedback on your favorite photos. If you don’t have a 500px account, you can get a free one right here!

Winners
Lightroom 4 Live Ticket
– Owen Colborne

KelbyTraining.com 1-Month Subscription
– Kim Spanulo

That’s it for today. Have a great Thursday!

I, Photographer

I believe it was last summer when I was having dinner with Brad Moore at City Fish in Oldsmar, FL when he asked me to write my first post for Scott's illustrious Guest Blog series. I was humbled, giddy, and nervous. As a longtime follower of Scott's work, being asked to contribute marked a milestone in my career as a photographer. I fully admit modeling a lot of how I teach and relate with our users at onOne Software based on Scott's practices, so you can imagine my surprise when I got an email from Brad a few weeks ago with the subject, "It's that time again." I am truly honored to reprise my role as guest contributor and I'd like to thank Scott, Brad, Matt, RC, Corey, Stinky Pete and the rest of my good friends at Kelby Media for doing so much to help so many of us reach our own milestones as photographers.

<Cue the Wayne's World wave dissolve and smoothly segue to the post>

I will always remember the first time I admitted to actually being a photographer to someone. It was in late winter of 2009 and I was photographing the beautiful and frigid coastline of Provincetown, MA. At the time, I had a full time job at a software company that created products for the financial sector and I was also starting to make inroads with my own little commercial photography business. I already had a few solid gigs under my belt and had been lining up some more. Things were looking good and my goal was to move into doing this full time at some point in 2010. While I was photographing the Provincetown coastline, an elderly woman saw what I was doing, walked up to me, and asked me plainly, "What do you do?"

And to that, for the first time in my life, I answered, "I'm a photographer."

Prior to that, I would have likely stumbled and stammered to justify what I was doing and I'm sure that more than a few of you can relate. For some reason, there is this layer of self-doubt that we have when owning up to answering this particular question. It's almost as if we are trying to justify it to ourselves as we answer it. Before I move on to how this memory spurred the point of this post, let me clear the air. We are all photographers. Whether you are a casual hobbyist, an avid enthusiast or a part/full time paid professional, just by virtue of picking up a camera with the intention of freezing a moment in time, you are a photographer.

So why is it that so many of us get defensive when someone calls you an amateur photographer? It's such a beautiful word, so appropriate for so many of us out there, and yet in the same breath, it is seen as a form of denigrationâ”a lower rung in a caste system of photographers. Have you ever actually looked up the definition of amateur? While there are different interpretations of the word, the definition I wholeheartedly subscribe to is â˜a person who engages in a pursuit.' Doesn't that sound so lovely? It almost has a romantic feel to it. And it's true after all, isn't it? Aren't we all actively engaged in the pursuit of our photography? While I consider myself a working photographer, I also wholly consider myself an amateur. Photography is my life and I will dedicate my time here to mastering it in my own way and helping others find their own paths.

But let's go back to the issue at handâ”namely, the consternation that we feel when we have to justify whether we are photographers. It was in thinking about this that I realized what I should write about. The problem lies in this pervasive need to seek the approval of as many people as possible in order to justify whether you are a photographer, and worse, whether you are even a good photographer. For many of us, the quality of an image has been relegated to the response rate and engagement percentage of a post you made on your social media outlet of choice. Good, honest, quality feedback has been supplanted by mindless Likes and +1s. Our entire scale of artistic growth has been commoditized whereas the clear voices of a small group of mentors and trusted friends have been replaced by a cacophony of fleeting words and phrases left as comments. And then there are the trolls and the flame wars. Small-minded people getting off on slicing and dicing anything that you share with impunity, no matter what the nature is.

The culmination of investing your emotions and tying your growth to all of these things can be terribly destructive and stifling for those photographers out there who are doubtful of themselves and not sure whether they feel like they can contribute anything meaningful to the world with their work. All of this static may serve to turn someone away, making them gun-shy to share their work or even pick up a camera in the first place. I am saying this because I know it to be true. I have friends who are impacted in this way and it truly saddens me and that is why I wanted to bring it to light here. Photography is only what you make it out to be for yourself.

Understand this: photography isn't easy. There are no shortcuts. It's laden with frustration and disappointment, but it's also a labor of love. Yes, the barrier to entry for creating an image is extremely lowâ”just pick up any device capable of capturing an image and press a button. If that's as far as you want to take it, then by all means "snapshoot" away. I'll support you 100%.

There is one lesson I'm hoping you take away from this: true growth in photography, or in any craft or vocation, requires confidence in yourself and confidence in your ability to dust yourself off when you do fail, because you will. It also means that you have confidence to weed out the static and confidence to pursue meaningful growth from those you trust and who will give feedback that is both constructive and supportive and not laced with anything else.

If there is one concept that I am vehemently passionate about, it is sharing of work. I share my work because I believe that is how I infuse the last piece of soul into my image. I also share the anecdotes and technical details surrounding the creation of my images because I absolutely love teaching my techniques and giving away the farm. I don't share to get comments, +1s or Likes. They are most certainly appreciated but please understand that they aren't any sorts of driving forces for me. I share because I am a photographer and sharing is the elemental outcome of being a photographer.

I'd like to leave you with what my hope is that you'll take away from this post. Do you remember when I defined the word â˜Amateur' up above? It is a person who engages in a pursuit, and in this case, the pursuit is photography. What I'd like you to think about is â˜who are you pursuing photography for?' By determining the true answer to that question, I suspect you'll find your individualized path to artistic growth appear a bit more clearly.

And always remember: never stop shooting.

Thank you for your time.

You can see more of Brian’s work at BrianMatiash.com, and find him on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

BREAKING: The Light It. Shoot It. Retouch It. LIVE Tour Lighting Kit is $100 off at B&H today only!

As mentioned this morning, we’ve been doing a short 5-minute broadcast at the top of each hour today starting at 10:00am Eastern. In each one, we’ve shared some of the best Cyber Monday deals for photographers we could find, including some great ones from KelbyTraining.com and NAPP :-)

Here’s the first video of the bunch (with links below it), and the rest after the jump:

http://youtu.be/ky3BywdtEBQ

Topaz 50% Off ALL PRODUCTS
https://www.topazlabs.com

500px.com
Cyber Monday Awesome account just $37.95 (normally $50).
https://500px.com/upgrade

B&H with LR 4 at $99 plus Matt’s DVD
http://bhpho.to/TqF5Dj

Kelby Training Online – $40 Off with promo code CYBERMON12
http://kelbytrainingonline.com

40% off SmugMug – must use code cybersmug
http://www.smugmug.com/

Tether Tools – 20% Off Wallee Gear for iPad
http://conta.cc/UXhWp3

Gelakins 20% off EVERYTHING
http://bit.ly/V2B9Wy

Kelly Moore Bags: $25 off any bag (use the code BLACKFRIDAY25).
http://kellymoorebag.com

(more…)

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