Great video today from our friend and colleague, Jefferson Graham, about all the cool new stuff for iPhoneographers in the upcoming operating system update for the iPhone – IOS 15

(NOTE: Apple is having a big event on Tuesday to launch the new iPhones, maybe a new watch, and perhaps other cool stuff, so we’ll have access to this new stuff fairly soon). Anyway, check out this short video from Jeff:

Thanks, Jefferson. Can’t wait until Tuesday for news on the camera hardware side of things.

Have a great NFL football weekend, everybody. #RollTide and high-five to the Bucs for beating the Cowboys last night. That was more of a nail-biter than I had hoped, but we pulled it off. Now for a big Alabama win! :)

-Scott

Blind Photo Critiques with Scott Kelby & Erik Kuna | The Grid Ep. 483

Fresh off of Photoshop World, Scott Kelby and Erik Kuna are back this week with another installment of the fan favorite, Blind Photo Critiques! Tune in to see what advice they have for this week’s batch of user-submitted photos.

New KelbyOne Course: The Infrared Landscape with Deborah Sandidge

Infrared photography is a wonderful way to broaden your photographic horizons and expand your creativity! Join Deborah Sandidge as she introduces you to the fundamentals of infrared photography. Nothing can quite compare with the surreal factor of bright white foliage, a dark sky and how beautifully infrared light is reflected and absorbed by different surfaces. In this class Deborah introduces you to the types of infrared photography, the gear you’ll need, what to look for when shooting infrared, and inspire you to open yourself up to a new outlet for artistic expression.

It’s #TravelTuesday again and I, Dave Williams, am here from Salisbury Plain, home of Stonehenge, with about as much wisdom as I bring to the party every Tuesday. Let’s go!

This morning I woke up bright and early to shoot sunrise over Stonehenge, a neolithic stone monument here in the UK on Salisbury Plain. Whilst I was here, I noticed two other photographers had similar ideas, though not quite the same idea. One of them was up early and then disappeared before the sun was up. One appeared once the sun was up, missing the bit before dawn. It was a little odd because they both had cameras on tripods, so I wanted to quickly explain why I shoot the whole sunrise.

The photographer that was up before the dawn broke was shooting the blue hour. Blue hour is so named because the sky is largely blue because as the sun hasn’t breached the horizon yet its warm light doesn’t cast. It’s worth noting that it isn’t actually an hour, but can be longer or shorter depending on the season and latitude. Here’s my blue hour shot from this morning: –

The other photographer missed out on blue hour and shot golden hour. Again, this isn’t actually an hour, but it’s the time just after the sun breaks the horizon in the morning (or just before it does so in the evening) and, owing to various environmental and scientific factors including the effects of the wavelength of red light and the distance from us, we get a red or orange sky. Here’s what that looked like this morning for me: –

I was left a little baffled about why, if you’d dragged yourself out of bed at 6am, you wouldn’t shoot both types of light. It dawned on me, if you’ll pardon the pun, that perhaps they’d each only ever seen the one type of morning light and perhaps weren’t even aware of the other.

I know it’s a big ask, but here’s what I would like you all to do:

One day, when you have the time, get yourself up an hour before the sun is due to rise. The sky should still be a little dark and you will probably be able to see a star or two. Now, just watch what happens. Take a camera, or don’t take a camera, it’s entirely up to you, but be sure to observe exactly what is happening in the sky all around you. Notice the colours change. Watch what happens just before the sun breaks the horizon. Then how fast it moves. Watch where it goes. Watch how the light changes. Just take note of all that happens at sunrise and how it can affect a photo. Then, if you want, make a cup of tea and go back to bed.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. Sunrise totally beats sunset.

Have a great day!

Much love
Dave

Great tip from photographer and podcaster and just generally awesome guy, Frederick Johnson about a technique he learned when he was a military photographer to learn to break down barriers and getting access when you want to take a street portrait. It’s just a 60-second tip, but so interesting.

Thanks, Frederick. Don’t forget to check out Frederick’s new course on KelbyOne.

Have a great weekend, everybody!

-Scott

P.S. A big thanks to everyone around the world who came and spent this week with us at the Photoshop World Conference. It was a blast to see everyone, and we’re so grateful for the wonderful turnout, and awesome people we met along the way. Thank you again for your support and hope you learned a lot, laughted a lot, and make some new friends. :) 

New KelbyOne Course: The Time-Traveling Photographer with Frederick Van Johnson

Did you know your camera can act like a time machine? Join Frederick Van Johnson as he shares his unique philosophy on this topic. In this class he explores three different techniques—multiplicity, cinemagraphs, and adding motion to a still image—that you can incorporate into your photography. Starting with the fundamentals, Frederick discusses the tools he uses, and then steps through a series of demonstrations involving on location shoots and in-studio post-processing to teach you how to accomplish each technique from start to finish.

In Case You Missed It: Mastering Multiple Exposures Using Advanced Flash Techniques

If learning advanced flash techniques from a legendary photographer gets you excited, then get ready for a serious adrenaline boost! Join Joe McNally as he teaches advanced lighting setups and camera flash techniques for creating spectacular multiple exposures of the same image

It’s #TravelTuesday and I, Dave Williams, am here! I apologise that it’s a little late in the day, but better late than never.

To those attending Photoshop World, I hope you have a fantastic conference and get to absorb a load of knowledge from the amazing instructor line-up!

Today, I want to touch on the importance of photography and the time-travelling opportunities it presents. Photos play an important role in everyone’s life, as well as being the things we photographers take pride in, practice, and on top of that, they remind us of places, people, feelings, smells, and evoke memories of what was happening at the time the photo was taken. Personally, each photo serves as a reminder of what happened throughout the day the photo was taken, evoking memories of trips overseas and childhood memories in a similar way that music can. Photos have been proven to stimulate our minds to such an extent that things we thought were long forgotten can be stirred up, including vital clues to events in history and important facts.

Photography helps us document events and moments in time, finding things in common and sharing experiences post-event.

Perhaps the reason being this evocation caused by photos is that when we capture an image, we freeze the memories that go along with it. It can encapsulate that moment in time in such a way that we can reinvigorate the memory years after it was taken, in particular, when the emotions that run alongside it are stronger than usual.

Photos are stories and there’s a story behind every image. By looking at photos, we can conclude a lot of things based on the photographer’s skill and actions beyond the visuals. The story can be contained within a single image as a result of the skills we learn and utilise as photographers, and we can even inspire others through our photography. We can inspire others to travel, to enjoy life, to celebrate moments, to become aware, or to build connections.

Photography is art, it’s science, and it’s a skill that goes beyond either of those things as well. Photography is something special and I’m proud to be a photographer.

Much love

Dave

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