I’ve been working on this series for a while now, and I finally got enough to do a full post over at Exposure.co (so all the shots, and full story is over there. Exposure.to is designed for photographic story-telling).

It’s a series of famous landmarks, buildings and monuments photographed as if they were taken on a white seamless paper background, but surprisingly the white sky effect is primarily done “in-camera” (I explain it, and the post processing part of it over on the post).

If you've got a quick minute, I hope you'll check it out -  here’s the link. 

Hope you all have an awesome week this week!

Best,

-Scott

 

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About The Author

Scott is the President of KelbyOne, an online educational community for Photographers, Photoshop and Lightroom users. He's editor and publisher of Photoshop User Magazine, Conference Technical Chair for the Photoshop World Conference, and the author of a string of bestselling Photoshop, Lightroom, and photography books.

37 Comments

  1. Wow, great idea Scott!

  2. Hey Scott,

    Wow, those photos are really Great! I love the look! I just might have to try it on a few of my overexposed sky photos!

    Thanks for the info!

    Dennis

  3. Thats pretty sweet. Nice reinvention of the photographic wheel!

  4. Very cool idea, Scott. The complete opposite of Glyn Dewis’ black background look! Cranking up the Clarity really brought out the detail in these shots. Didn’t we see the London Eye shot on your blog once before?

    Yikes, does Amazon know you’re doing this? They do have the patent for this whole white background thingie. ;-)

    The proof reader in me noticed a couple of typos in the text. Maybe you can go back and edit them: On the Leaning Tower of Pisa shot you wrote, “but I gotta ya, the tower, and this statue are pretty black and white”. I think you missed the word “tell” after “gotta”. Also, on the Big Ben shot you wrote, “not the tower itself which his now officially named”. Minor, I know, but worth mentioning! :-)

    Have a super Tuesday!

    –John

  5. Cool idea! Gotta love happy accidents :)

  6. don’t let Amazon’s patent lawyers see this!
    ;-)

  7. Great way to be open to possibilities.

  8. Now if you were shooting a mirrorless camera with an EVF you’d have discovered this without even bringing your image into Lightroom, just by seeing what the compensation dial does. :) I discovered this last year while setting up a group shot as we crossed over the Tropic of Capricorn in Namibia. http://www.fotozones.com/live/index.php/gallery/image/3643-tropic-of-capricorn/

  9. This is totally off subject but this morning in a frame from Hobby Lobby, I think I see your very own Pete Collins and his son. Is this possible? Thought maybe you would enjoy it.

  10. I love this! This is a great idea for those times when you are forced to shoot in the mid-day sun.

  11. Count me in the “I Like It” camp. Cool series Scott.

  12. I thoroughly enjoyed that photo set. Scott, you just made my day!
    Thanks,
    Mark R.

  13. Wait, maybe you should contact Amazon’s lawyers and patent your technique? Seriously though, fun images. I loved the red car on the London Eye as well, then read your text.

  14. Love them all, but the one with the Pyramid is really stunning, congrats!!! (Scott, when a lesson on negative fill light for portraits?)

  15. These are all very pleasing. They have that character of the old time etchings when there were print publications in the days of yore. We all know the old saying, “One is a mistake, twenty is a style.” I look forward to seeing some more.

  16. Thanks for showing these, as well as the technique to achieve this look. Question: how do you see this style integrating into your travel photography? Would you include this technique in a travel photo book along with more traditionally captured and post-processed photos, or do you think they have to stand alone?

  17. I like the creative thinking that went into this Scott! Seems like just yesterday when you did a tutorial on this technique. I really get inspired by your travel photography.

  18. Hi Scott, I really like these shots as well! As an architect I can tell you these are fantastic at isolating and focusing the viewer’s eye on the buildings (or architecture if you like). I can’t wait to try this technique myself – amazon be damned! ;) A question, does the sky need to be cloudless? or overcast? or will overexposing combined with the lightroom adjustments make clouds disappear?

  19. Scott, I just wanted to let you know how beautiful the “World on White Seamless” series is! What a great idea! The subject in the photos really popped out at you, and the detail was gorgeous. I’m such a fan! :)

  20. Very cool. I was not sure what to expect…and I liked your happy accident. Thank you for sharing!

  21. Count me as one who thinks those images look very cool!

  22. Scott. You saved my day. I am just about to restyle the dining area in my appartment. My idea was to have some large print in black & white or low color or low key or high key on the wall next to the table. I was not sure if I should just apply some b&w action to my cityscape images or to do some compositing or … But now i know. Thanks so much for this inspiration.

  23. Hi Scott, I just wanted to say that this article and concept is quite amazing and definitely caught my interest. I’m not sure if it’s ok to share my work here but I took a couple of photos last night and tried this effect. Not quite as seamless as yours but very fun to try! Thanks for the tips and inspiration! You rock.
    -Jimmy Y, Vancouver, BC

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