Daily Archives May 11, 2022

Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival in Manchester, TN, USA on June 10, 2017.

Editor’s Note: This is the second part of a two-part series. If you missed it, check out the first one, Gear For Photographing Music Festivals.

As creatives, we want to focus on creating, right? But if we don’t have the technical side of things set up properly, it can hinder our ability to create on a larger level. Like, if I spend more time than absolutely necessary downloading my images and manually adding metadata every single time, it’s going to take longer for me to get back out to all of the amazing things happening that I want to photograph.

Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival in Manchester, TN, USA on June 10, 2017.

So, by taking the time to set ourselves up for success BEFORE we arrive to a job, we are able to focus on actually creating and doing a better job at it. Here are the steps I took to do just that ahead of photographing Bonnaroo.


Camera Setup

First, I made sure the dates and times were synced up exactly between the two camera bodies. This is vital when you’re covering an event with more than one camera body, as well as when you’re working with other photographers. If things aren’t synced up correctly, it can cause your editor and others huge headaches trying to keep everything straight and in order.

Matoma performs at Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival in Manchester, TN, USA on June 10, 2017.

After that, I got all my settings dialed into one body, then copied those settings onto a CF card, put that card into the other camera, and loaded the settings onto that body. Then I entered in my copyright and artist info into the metadata of each body. I also used the Canon EOS Utility to input “1” or “2” into the Instructions IPTC info on each camera. More on this in a bit.

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