Posts By Brad Moore

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Portrait of Eddie Tapp / Image © Phillip Charis

Half the Image

There are primarily three ingredients that make a photograph become a part of you. Looking at images from the likes of Joe McNally, you would make a quick assumption that the subject matter is high on the list, and naturally the subject matter itself is what we see. But that is aesthetical rather than technical, and aesthetics I’ll leave for later. Technically, there are three ingredients that bring us into a photograph. I’ll get to that later too.

Without thinking about it, look through a magazine that you’re not so familiar with (and maybe ones that you are). As you flip through the pages, something will stop you and you will give this page your undivided attention. When this happens, chances are something visual grabbed your attention first. (more…)

Hello there.  Me again.  Scott has been in Portland since yesterday morning and spent the day shooting with Laurie Excell.  Today is the next stop on his Lightroom Tour (fingers crossed that this one will run smoothly), and he gave away a free ticket to the seminar to a lucky follower on Twitter last night.

For those wondering about Scott’s computer, it was a hard drive failure (as he always says, it’s not if your drive fails, it’s when!).  And, yes, he did have everything backed up with Apple’s Time Machine.  I’m sure he’ll give you the full run-down when he gets back next week.

One of the things on said hard drive was an embarrassing photo, which was supposed to be for yesterday’s blog.  You’ll will get to see that next week :)

For those keeping up with Photo Walk news, I’m posting daily over on the Photo Walk Blog.  Swing by and check it out!

For fans of Joe McNally, he just posted a video on YouTube from when he was testing out the Nikon D3.  If you like cameras, elephants, frogs, birds, or snakes, you might enjoy it.  You might also catch a glimpse of me.  I’m the guy wearing the red shirt and goofy hat when our friend Suzie the Elephant was with us in the desert.  That was a great day :)

And lastly, there’s a new episode of DTown TV up, which includes tips on AF Priority modes, features on the new D5000, info on Picture Control settings, and a tip on shutter speeds when using studio lights.

That’s it for today.  Have a happy Memorial Day Weekend!

-Brad

Wait, two guest blogs in a row?  Well, not exactly.

Scott asked me to write something on his behalf to let you guys know that he can’t post a blog for today.  Why, you ask?  Because his laptop died last night.  A horrible, grueling, painful death…  But it will be fixed by the time he does his Portland Lightroom 2 Live Seminar, so that is still on as scheduled.  (Did I just hear a huge sigh of relief coming from the West Coast?)

So, let’s see… How about a couple of updates…

The Worldwide Photo Walk Blog (hosted by yours truly) is now up and running!  I’ll be doing my best to keep you all up to date on what locations are full, nearing capacity, and just opening, along with any other Photo Walk related news.  So, swing by, scroll to the bottom, and check it out!

If you’re following Scott on Twitter, you know he was going to announce the winner of a free pass to his Portland Lighroom 2 Live Seminar soon.  But, since he doesn’t have a computer, it’s not looking like that’s going to happen.  But I can guarantee this won’t be the last time he does giveaways on Twitter, so if you’re not already following him, it might pay off to sign up and follow ;)  [Speaking of the Photo Walk and Twitter, the official hashtag is #SKphoto.]

That’s it for now.  If I know Scott, I’m sure he’ll have a story and lesson from today to share with all of us when he gets back to the blog, so check back later to see what he has to say!  Happy Thursday everyone :)

-Brad

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(Photo by Jeff Schewe)

Before I begin my post I would very much like to thank Scott Kelby for allowing me both the honor and privilege to write this blog entry on the one-year anniversary of “Guest Blog Wednesday.” All I can say is it was a lot easier writing the first guest blog entry a year ago. With all of the amazing words and thoughts that have been written here by some of the greatest creative voices of our time, to do this again is a wee bit intimidating. (more…)

The Coming Revolution


I believe we’re at a turning point in the way we, as an industry, approach our craft. Thanks to the internet, information moves faster and faster, filling our brains to bustin’ with everything any of us could ever hope to know about off-camera flash, HDR techniques, hyperfocal distances, and the effect of aperture shape on bokeh. We have learned more and more, and if we have not it’s not for lack of information. And at the end of day we’re still hungry; full up on HOW and still wondering WHY.

My first book came out on Monday. After writing it and spinning much of it around the idea that WHY always drives HOW, I am more convinced than ever that we are about to reach critical mass with the the HOW, and that we’re slowly turning, collectively, to see the vaccum that has formed while we weren’t paying attention. That vaccum is passion, vision, and the reason we picked up cameras to begin with – the need to express ourselves. To use a metaphor; it’s as though we’re reaching the pinnacle of typewriter technology and have awoken to find that what we’re really passionate about is the stories, the poems, and the words themselves rather than the keys and ribbons. (more…)

New Adventures in Photography

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Photo by Corey Rich

In 2000 I was a software developer living in Tucson, Arizona. I had been rock climbing for seven years, and taking pictures of my adventures. I was totally psyched on Galen Rowell’s Art of Adventure Photography. I too wanted to share my passion for the great outdoors – not just how it looked, but how I felt about it and how I thought about it. Simple ideas like this make a young person reckless. I quit my job to “go pro.” This was a hilarious idea by the way – I didn’t actually stop doing software work on the side for another six years.

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On the Sharp End. Self portrait from the Whetstone Mountains in Arizona.

My first publication was a 2-page spread in Outside Magazine. Climbing in the remote Whetstone Mountains of Southern Arizona, I made a photograph of my hand reaching out into a cave from 40 feet up, clipping my lead rope to the next protection point, depicting the first-person view of what it’s like “on the sharp end” of the lead-rope.

I was hanging from a rope to get this shot of course, not actually climbing. After climbing the line once before, I thought about the idea for a photograph. I went back up with the camera (a Nikon F100) and spent some time getting myself in position for the shot. I contorted myself Superman-style to hold the rope with one hand, shoot with the other, and keep my feet and gear out of the frame. That’s the way a lot of my “adventures” actually went. Out playing somewhere, I would get an idea, marinate on it for a while, and then come back later to create a photograph. (more…)

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