Editorial Note: Scott’s taking some time off from the blog, so he’s asked Brad Moore, Corey Barker, and Pete Collins to take over for a few days. Thanks for checking out Brad’s post today, and come back Monday to see what Corey has for you and Tuesday for a post from Pete!

Red Rocks Amphitheater… It’s one of the most iconic concert venues in the US, if not the world. It was on my list of places where I wanted to see a show during my lifetime, and thankfully I got to do that and more this past weekend! Here’s a rundown of what happened.

A few years ago David Carr, drummer for the band Third Day, started getting into photography. He found the Kelby videos and books, and through those found some of my concert photography and saw that I had photographed them before. He reached out to me to invite me to shoot an upcoming show of theirs, and since then we’ve been buds! During that time, I’ve had the opportunity to photograph them a number of times, including at their sold-out Third Day & Friends show at Gwinnett Arena in Atlanta last year.

This year they decided to do another of these shows, not just in Atlanta, but also at Red Rocks. As soon as I found out about it, I contacted the band and told them I’d be happy to come out and cover this momentous show if they wanted. Thankfully they agreed, and out I went!

As soon as you arrive, you realize this place is just breathtaking (especially if you’re going up and down the stairs a bunch)! The band took the stage for sound check, and I wondered around snapping shots without getting in their way. Over the years I’ve learned that the stage is not just a performance space, but it’s also a workplace for the band and their crew. As I am their guest, I have to be very respectful of their space and make sure I’m not doing anything/going anywhere I’m not supposed to. Now that I’ve had the opportunity to cover their shows a number of times and gotten to know the crew a bit, this becomes easier to navigate. But if it’s your first time working with a band, you want to tread lightly and triple check with the crew before doing anything.

One reason you want to make friends with the crew (besides just to be a kind, decent person) is if you want to set up a remote camera on stage…

This is a Canon 5D MkIII with a 14mm f/2.8. On top is a PocketWizard Plus III, and it’s all mounted to a Manfrotto 244 Variable Friction Arm with Camera Bracket and Super Clamp. The clamp goes around the rigging for the lighting, then I positioned the rest of the arm and camera accordingly. Once everything was in place, I tightened it down and secured it with zip ties and a safety cable. Because of the wide variation of light, I set it to shoot bursts of three bracketed shots: two stops under, even, and two stops over. Auto ISO, aperture priority at f/5.6 (just for depth of field/focus safety), evaluative metering. I also focused the camera, then switched it to manual focus so it wouldn’t be focus searching during moments of low light.

Because of the size and uniqueness of the venue, I wanted to set up a remote camera at the top/back as well (also so I wouldn’t have to be going all the way up and back down throughout the show and missing up-close moments).

This is the same setup as on stage, but with the 8-15mm f/4 fisheye lens at 15mm, also set to f/5.6. The fisheye allowed me to capture the full rock on the left side of the image all the way over to the stage on the right, as well as some of the landscape beyond that, which you’ll see later. I triggered both of these remotes with a third Pocket Wizard Plus III that I kept with me and fired by hand instead of putting it on one of the cameras I had on me. I did it this way because the moments I would be shooting with the cameras I had on me wouldn’t necessarily be the moments I wanted to capture with the remote cameras. The remotes were more about the crowd than the stage, so I had to wait for moments where the crowd was lit up and not just the stage.

After sound check, there’s a good bit of time to set up the above remote cameras, chill, and grab food before the show starts. Of course even the dressing rooms in this venue are amazing because the venue is built around the natural rock formations!

The first half of the show was the “Friends” portion featuring Warren Barfield, Peter FurlerPhil Wickham, Brandon Heath, and Matt Maher. During this portion, the acts alternated between performing on the main stage and a secondary stage that was set up above the front of house sound area in the middle of the crowd.

To cover the show, I had two Canon 1DX bodies on me set to auto ISO with a 1/250 minimum shutter speed, aperture priority, and spot metering. One had the 70-200mm f/2.8 and the other switched between my new favorite lens ever, the 11-24mm f/4, and the not as favorite but still very useful 24-70mm f/2.8, all shot wide open at f/2.8 or f/4.

After the Friends all performed, there was intermission, so I retreated back to the band’s dressing room to snap some candids of them getting ready.

Just before they took the stage, they took a minute to go sign the iconic tunnel that leads from backstage, underneath the seating area, and up to the front of house sound area…

Pretty much everyone who plays at Red Rocks signs the tunnel, so it’s covered in legendary names. You could spend hours searching for your favorite musicians if you wanted!

With that rite of passage under their belts, the band took the stage for their sold-out show!

As the band performed, I shot from on stage, in front of the stage, side stage, the front of house sound area, and anywhere else I could find a decent vantage point. And all along the way I kept an eye on the crowd waiting for moments where it was lit up, then laying down on the remote trigger and hoping for the best.

I learned a lesson about remotes that are a decent distance away from you in large crowds of people that night… Theoretically every time I hit the trigger, both cameras should have fired, thus having pretty close to the same number of shots by the end of the show. But that was not the case… The on stage camera fired over 3,300 shots, while the one at the back of the venue only fired around 500 shots.

When I set them up, I tested the trigger distance, and it worked from the back of the venue all the way to the stage. But my guess is that once the venue filled up, all of the cell phone and radio frequencies caused interference. Since I was much closer to the stage throughout the show, that remote fired more reliably than the one at the back. Should I do another similar setup in the future, the remedy to this would be to set up another PocketWizard Plus III halfway back in the venue to serve as a “repeater.” This would receive the signal from the trigger, then relay it on to the remote with a stronger signal to ensure it fires reliably.

At the end of the show, the band took a bow, then I ran out to get a shot of them facing me with the crowd in the background.

And that was that! It was an amazing experience, one that I won’t soon forget. A HUGE thanks to the band for bringing me out to the show and letting me have a dream come true experience!

You can see more of Brad’s work at BMOOREVISUALS.COM, and follow him on Instagram and Twitter.

About The Author

9 Comments

  1. Brad, thanks for showing your work for this concert. Terrific images! Was there much post-processing on them? With that many people at the venue, did you worry about the safety of that camera in the back at all, or did you have a friend watching it?
    You really should do a class on KelbyOne!
    –John

  2. Great post. I love your concert pics – these as well as the stuff on your site. Third Day is one of my favorite bands too, so I can appreciate getting the opportunity to cover their event. It has to be hard working and not getting caught up in the show. I shoot mostly sports and know how hard it is for me to cover the action and not get caught up in the game when the Vols are playing. Again, great post as always.

  3. Great, great stuff! I’ll have to try Auto ISO the next time I shoot a show. I’ve been to Red Rocks, but the venue was empty, so I enjoyed seeing your images at night during the concert. Thanks.

  4. Awesome work Brad!!! Have to say, I would have had a hard time shooting that concert because I would have just wanted to be a fan and listen. Love the images you came away with!

  5. Outstanding work, Brad! Here’s a link to my video playlist of excellent 4K concert videos…
    youtube.com/playlist?list=PLc3T5BcYz4FJZ-dOUiqzB_UsMIwzYe8rH

  6. Great work. Large open areas without roofs and loads of people definitely affect the pocket wizard signal. Love the use here of wide angles to capture the feel of the venue. I really need to work on that in my work. I originally came from a video background which is more of a close-up medium and it’s so hard to force myself to shoot wide. Thanks for sharing.

  7. What an amazing opportunity! I see that Tai Anderson made it to that show. I have been a fan since the beginning and about 2 years ago I finally got to photograph them also. Definitely a dream assignment. While I love your work and your shots, shooting like you describe is just a dream for many of us struggling concert photographers. 2 1DXs & 2 5DM3 is out of the price range of most photographers, knowing that concert photography hardly ever pays well. I think it is amazing for you to get the opportunity!

  8. What a wild experience! You have some fabulous images and, I expect, you have some great stories that have not been told yet to go with the images.

Leave a Reply

Close