Category Archives Flash

Hi, gang, and happy Monday! The awesome team at B&H Photo asked me to share some flash tips for portrait photographers, and I thought I’d share them here with you fine folks, so here we go:

Hope you found those helpful, handy, etc.

Hey, if you’re really into learning Flash, I know a book that might help. :)

Here’s the link to it on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or direct from the Publisher, Rocky Nook publishing.

Here’s to a kick butt week — hope yours will be happy, healthy, and full of opportunity! :0

-Scott

Thanks to everybody who came to the Flash Photography Conference

We had such a great crowd — really enthusiastic, totally into learning more about flash, and just an awful lot of fun to preset to. Joe was, as you might imagine, just phenomenal on every level. People were raving about his talks and classes the whole time.

Joe is a living legend, and it was such an honor to have shared the stage with him. Also, I want to thank my team at KelbyOne who worked so hard to make this happen, with a special shout out to Christina, Erik, Juan, Mike, Rachel, Margie, Angela, Julio and Kathy, plus Ron and Jason who traveled up to Joe’s Studio in Connecticut and brought us the live action from up there.

Thanks to everyone who came and made it such an incredible event. I’m very grateful for the wonderful turnout, and all great folks to spend a few days with. :)

Here’s wishing you all a safe, healthy, and fun weekend. :)

-Scott

On Tuesday, the KelbyOne Flash Photography Conference 2020 kicks off (featuring the world’s #1 wizard of flash, Joe McNally), but the day before I’m doing a pre-conference workshop for people who are absolute flash photography beginners, designed to get folks up and running fast.

I’ll be literally starting from scratch, but I think what most folks will find surprising is how easy is actually is to make professional looking portraits with flash, and I’m sharing a recipe, camera settings, flash settings and all, that works every time (I hear from students all the time who tell me they’ve tried it and it worked perfectly even the first time they tried it).

Then on Tuesday it splits into two training tracks: one for beginners with me, and an intermediate / advanced track with Joe. Although the whole event is live (with Joe up in a studio in Connecticut and me down in Tampa), but we archive the entire conference for six full months so you can go rewatch any sessions, or catch any sessions you missed on either track. I’m putting the official trailer below (it’s really short — it’ll help a lot in you deciding if this is for you).

Photographers from all over have already signed up, and it’s not too late if you want to join us next week.

Here’s the link for tickets and more details.

This is incredible opportunity for anyone whose ever wanted to learn flash, or for existing flash photographers who want to take their skills to the next level fast. Hope I’ll see you online starting Monday, and then all day Tuesday and Wednesday.

Have a great weekend, everybody. Safe safe and sane, and we’ll catch you next week. :)

-Scott

P.S. Joe did a fantastic blog post this week about what he’s teaching at the conference His track is going to be incredible. Here’s the link if you’ve got a sec.

Don’t miss out — photographers everywhere are signing up to be a part of this epic two-day, two-track live event next Tuesday/Wednesday featuring the King of Flash, Joe McNally. Details and tickets here.

Here’s wishing you a fantastic week, and good health throughout. #rolltide!

-Scott

P.S. If you missed Terry White’s excellent video on “Which Lightroom is right for you — Cloud or Classic?” here’s a link. Really great info.

Watch the short video below and you’ll see what it’s all about and why it might be just what you’ve been waiting for:

Joe shared the news about the conference in his newsletter earlier this week, and here’s what he wrote about the event:

“After these two days, your conversation with light will be in a different place, and your confidence with the tools of light will be accelerated.”

Wow. If I wasn’t already going to be teaching, I’d definitely be going. What an incredible opportunity!

The official dates are:

November 16-17, 2020 with a special pre-conference session for flash beginners the day before (open to all registered attendees). 

Here’s the link to get your tickets. It’s going to be something very special (Joe is one of the most amazing photographers on the planet, and the King of Flash), and you don’t want to miss out.

Hope you can join us in November — it’s going to be (wait for it…wait for it)…epic!

-Scott

P.S. Did I mention it was going to be epic? Cause it is. Going to be epic. You know what I meant, right?

I totally 100% recommend getting a real RF wireless controller for your off-camera flash. It will change your whole experience (for the better). However, I hear from a lot of folks who got burned by buying a controller that from the description seems like it would work with their existing flash, but then they find out (after hours of frustration) that it doesn’t work, and will never work.

So, here’s a quick look at how to avoid this whole mess so you wind up with the right controller.

Note: I don’t recommend getting just a wireless trigger. Those only fire your flash wirelessly. Get a controller — one where you can change the power of your flash, or turn it on/off right from your camera (it’s sits on top of your camera, in the hot-shoe mount).

OK, here’s where people get burned:

OK, so let’s say you’ve got a Nikon SB-5000 Speedlight (Flash). You find this Yongnuo manual flash trigger for $39 on B&H Photo (great price by the way — I have one of these and it works amazingly well), and it says it’s for Nikon cameras. You’ve got a Nikon camera, so you buy, and when you try it, it doesn’t work with your SB-5000 flash. That’s because it’s actually for Nikon owners who have a Yongnuo flash — not Nikon owners who have a Nikon flash. You have to have a Yongnuo flash to go with this Yongnuo wireless controller, but of course it’s important to buy the version that matches your camera brand (which in this example, is Nikon), so yes — you need the version of his controller “for Nikon.”

So, what are your options?

You have at least three:

Option 1: If you shoot Nikon, buy a Nikon brand transmitter, like the SU-800 seen above (or if you’re a Canon shooter like me, you’d get the ST-E3-RT Speedlite Transmitter, which is about $30 more than the Nikon version, or if you’re s Sony shooter then the Sony FA-WRC1M Wireless Radio Commander, which is about $100 more). They are designed to work perfectly with your same-brand, and they work like a charm.

Option 2: Find a third-party transmitter that actually will fire your Nikon, Canon or Sony brand flash, like the Godox XproC TTL for Canon shown above (it’s the same price for the Nikon, Canon [shown above] or Sony — $69, which is a great price. The reviews are somewhat mixed with some folks saying it works perfectly and some saying they can’t even get it to fire their Godox brand flash, but I didn’t see any that said it wouldn’t fire their Nikon or Canon or Sony flash, so it may be a problem with Godox flashes, rather than their transmitter. These Godox’s are really popular, with B&H show them as the #1 top-seller in the category for all three top brands of cameras.

Option 3: Go with a PocketWizard TT6 Transceiver for Canon or a Flex TT5 for Nikon. It’s more expensive than the Godox, but less expensive than the Canon or Nikon brand transmitters, but you need TWO of them (one to sit on your hot shoe mount on your camera, and the other to go under the flash itself on your light stand). This is defiantly a pro-level solution as PocketWizard is the gold standard for wireless remotes, but so is buying the name brand transmitter that matches your name brand flash, and that might save you a few bucks since you only need to buy one. But yet, it is an option.

There are other options out there, too, but I wanted to at least give you these three popular options in hopes that you wind up with a solution that works for your camera and your particular flash unit.

Important: Before you actually buy a wireless controller, look on B&H Photo’s page to make certain that whichever brand of controller you get, will work with your camera, and your flash. They list which models each is compatible with, so make sure you check that list before you hit the buy button.

Hope you found that helpful. Here’s wishing you a great day, and a safe, healthy weekend.

-Scott

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