Tag Archives success

Whether you shoot for fun or you’re an amateur turning pro, this little list contains the secrets to success. I’m Dave Williams, it’s #TravelTuesday, and it’s time to get on with things!

1 – Be committed

Take the sunrise analogy. If we’re committed, we’re there for the first light of the day, ready and keen to get started. If we’re willing to sacrifice a warm, comfortable bed in exchange for a cold, early morning, we’re demonstrating our commitment to travel photography and to ourselves.

2 – Think laterally

If we go where the crowds go, we’re more likely to take a shot that the crowds already got. If we think outside the box, however, we’re far more likely to create something unique that stands out amongst the crowd. It’s worth putting in the work to create something unique.

3 – Research hard!

If we put in the research behind our shots, we can plan for things that don’t often happen, like obscure moon phases or annual events. Putting ourselves in the right place at the right time will allow us to achieve something different, and meticulous planning results in us knowing where to be and when to be there. This research should present itself in the form of a shot list, allowing us to prioritise and plan whilst on a trip.

4 – Know your gear and techniques

Practicing hard and educating ourselves with regard to our gear and the techniques we can use will pay dividends when we’re on location. Having our methods honed so they become second nature means we can get far more done in a shorter time, and react to any changes effectively. We don’t need to travel to far-away locations to practice, we can do it close to home. When we are well-practiced it shows in our work.

5 – Learn patience

Patience is the most important tool in our bag—this is something I’ll always remember hearing Scott say. One characteristic of a great travel photographer is identifying and composing a photo, then waiting for everything to be right. The right light, the right colours, the right mood, the right anything—it often takes patience to have everything right.

6 – Be ready

Despite the need for patience, we also need to have the ability to reach quickly, responding to situations that develop around us. We need to understand the exposure triad (ISO, shutter, aperture) and know how to quickly apply it by touch only, so a fleeting moment doesn’t pass us by.

7 – Understand composition

We need to know when and how to apply the rule of thirds, leading lines, diagonals, the golden spiral, and every other compositional technique, as well as knowing when to break these rules with patterns, contrast, and depth.

8 – Self critique. A lot!

At the end of the day, when the shooting’s done, examine your work very carefully. Then take a break and come back to it again for another examination. Critique yourself and actively look for your mistakes so you know where to improve next time.

Photography is competitive, in some cases, more so than others. The most important thing is to have fun, and if we practice hard and achieve the most we possibly can, it becomes less stressful and easier to have fun.

Much love
Dave

Hi folks! Dave Williams here, fresh from moving house for you on #TravelTuesday. A little advice before I go on…don’t move house! It’s so much hassle! I had no idea I own a whole holdall worth of tripods and more photography gear than I think I’ll ever need.

The whole move has put me out of action for about a week, with very minimal access to my laptop and camera, while I deal with packing, moving, and unpacking. It has put me in a strange position because this hasn’t happened for a long time, and now I’m finding myself wondering which project to pick back up or what new project to start. It’s from that thought that I lay down these words for you today.

Like any other professional industry, photography constantly demands that we demonstrate our A-game, and constantly evolve to meet the flux of the battlefield we work in. However, unlike any other professional industry, photography is also an art. As artists, we combine this with constant learning and development. This learning is the key to growth as a photographer.

To this end, not only should we constantly be furthering our skillset through personal projects, but also through education. This means we should be setting ourselves goals and attaining them. The end goal should be big, but the steps should be little. Here’s why: –

If we want to get from A to Z, we pass B, C, D, E, F, G, etc., all the way to Z. If we liken this to our goals, we should have an end goal of Z and many smaller goals all along the way. Every time we meet an objective, we feel the success and we’re fuelled from it to drive us onto the next one. It gives us many successes all the way through to our goal, and it also gives us the opportunity to re-evaluate the goals as we’re moving. The other huge positive is, counterintuitively, in the negatives. If we fall, we only fall back one step rather than falling the whole way back to point A, so it’s far easier to pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and push forward again.

Easy, right? So get your end goal in sight, plot your course, and meet your goals!

Much love
Dave

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