Monthly Archives March 2009

Howdy folks; here's what's up: Adobe has released a free update to Camera Raw and Lightroom which adds supports for the Nikon D3x, and the Olympus E-30 cameras (Note: The Lightroom update also includes a few bug fixes). Here's where to download the free update for Camera Raw (Mac | Windows), and here's where to download the Lightroom update (Mac | Windows). Friend of the blog, photographer Janine Smith, knows I'm a Type freak, and she sent me this site that I absolutely Love. It's called "Flipping Typical" and when you go there, it looks at the fonts installed on your computer and shows you what any phrase you type looks like in all your fonts. This totally rocks for helping you find the right font for the job! (Yes, there are some tricks you can pull in Photoshop that sound like they do…

Jeff Revell of has just announced that he's hosting a free photowalk in Boston on Tuesday, March 24th, the day before Photoshop World kicks off. The walk is open to anyone (not just conference attendees), and is totally free and you should totally sign up for it (it's limited to just the first 50 people, so head over there and sign up now). Jeff has all the details on this site over at


A few weeks back Brad Moore, Photo Studio Manager at Kelby Media Group dropped me a line inviting me to be the Guest Blogger. I first met Brad while he was working with Joe McNally in New York. Brad came with Joe to the 20×24 Polaroid Studio, while I photographed Joe for my Behind Photographs Project. So, thanks Brad and Scott for giving me the stage for the day.

Photography is part of my soul, it is not my job. Simply put, I love it. Richard Avedon said it best, “If a day goes by without me doing something related to photography, it’s thought I’ve neglected something essential to my existence, as though I had forgotten to wake up.” So today I will share some images and some thoughts that help put a smile on my face and make me feel complete.

Ian Summers is a great business coach in our industry. He loves the quote, “Be who you is, cuz if you ain’t who you is, then you is who you ain’t.” As a photographer it is easy to try to imitate another shooter’s work and to try to be all things to all people. I am based in a smaller photo market in San Diego and often have to shoot a variety of styles to satisfy my clients. However, when it comes down to the work, I always try to give them what they want, then shoot something they way I see it. At least at the end of the shoot, you have something

...San Diego, California based commercial photographer Tim Mantoani. Brad was the one who first introduced me to Tim's work, in particular to a very cool project Tim has been doing, where he used 20x24 Polaroids to capture famous photographers posed with a print of one of their favorite shots. You can see his photographer portraits over at Tim's portfolio (here's the link), but while you're there, make sure you check out some of Tim's Sports and Commercial photography portfolios---he's got some really amazing work (and of course, be back here tomorrow to check out his guest blog post).

We had over 300 comments on the launch of our new weekly show for Nikon DSLR users, "D-Town TV," and we really listened to your ideas and suggestions, and have already started implementing many of them. Since we had so many questions, and I thought I'd answer at least a few of them here: Q. The opening music is really annoying. Are you guys going to change it anytime soon? A. Yeah, we heard that a bunch. Luckily, it's already done. We re-uploaded the original episode with new, less annoying music, and since we did that, everyone seems much happier. Q. We couldn't see how the Di-GPS connected to the camera because of your black shirt. Are you guys going to fix that? A. Man, did we hear an earful about this (this, and the opening music). Well, I don't know if you've noticed…

Here's a look at a shoot I did few weeks back, when I was in the final stages of wrapping up the writing for my Photoshop CS4 Down & Dirty Tricks Book. I needed a shot of a football player for one of the techniques, and so I did an in-studio shoot with a standout on the local high school team, Middle Linebacker Blake Johnson (shown above.). I wanted a real dramatic look for the lighting, so I shot Blake on a black background, and really tried to control the spill of the lights by using (1) metal Grids that snap right into the reflector on the front of the strobe, and (2) three large black flags (which are essentially just 24"x36" rectangles of black fabric that block the spread of the light). For most of the shoot, I used three lights. For the…