Yearly Archives 2011

“What type of photography do you do?” This seems to be the first question most people ask when they discover you are somewhat competent with the camera. I still don’t have a clear answer to this question. However, during a trip to Guatemala two years ago I quickly realized that travel/mission-oriented photography captivated me the most. It was the first time since I started doing photography that I was able to get out of the bubble that is America. Being in such humble, yet beautiful, conditions really showed me the power that this medium possessed.

Last year I had the chance to visit Haiti about 5 months after the quake. I went there to do make some images for Mission of Hope Haiti. MOH Haiti is an amazing organization that does so much that it’s difficult to know where to begin. For starters, on their grounds alone they have an orphanage, a school, a church, and a prosthetics lab. So many lives have been impacted and even saved by them. The mission is also so well run that they were more equipped than almost anyone else in the nation for the earthquake. In fact, they served more meals to people in the first week than the UN. It’s pretty unreal. To hear the doctors speak about the quake was chilling. They said the first victim arrived within 10 minutes, and that began a 36 hour marathon of emergency surgeries.

Also, the fact that they had a prosthetic lab was an absolute God send, in every sense of the word. They have a doctor who specializes in prosthetics come almost weekly to serve the people who need artificial limbs. I was allowed to ride along to drop some of the patients off at their homes on one occasion. Here are some images from that:

The entrance to one of the tent communities that housed a few of the patients

A sister comes home after getting fitted for a prosthetic

Several more kind folks

A man getting fitted back at the mission

The thing that struck me about the people was their real joy, despite their loss. They were so eager to love and to be hospital. It started to drizzle while I was there and I heard a woman calling to me in Creole. I went over to her and she took my camera and put it in a plastic bag to protect it. This is the heart of the people.

On another day we were taking a walk through a neighboring village. Because my guide had a good relationship with them, several of the people allowed me to make portraits of them.

A little girl and her puppy

A worker who is helping to rebuild

A kind older gentleman

One day we took the orphans from the mission to the beach. Here is a little girl experiencing the shore, maybe for the first time

Something about Haiti that I did not anticipate was the beauty…oh the beauty. We often hear of the poverty or the despair, and while that is a reality for many people there, there is an incredible amount of beauty as well.

The view from Mission of Hope Haiti

I thought after yesterday's "Hall of Shame" shots, I'd better post a few that didn't feature shots of the goal post (as epic as those were). This was a late afternoon game, and with the rolling back of Daylight Savings Time, by the time kick-off came around the entire field was already covered in shade, and a hour or so later, it was starting to get dark and I had to crank up the ISO nearly right off the bat. (Above: He just scored---why is he so angry at the ball?). ;-) Finding Out After The Fact It's rare for me to shoot a late-afternoon game. Most of the games I shoot are at 1:15 or at night, so I wasn't used to planning for the light to change to drastically, and I lost a lot of shots due to not watching my ISO…

(Above: You can go to and see tons of shots with a receiver catching the ball in the end zone for a touchdown [boring], but how many times do you see a new fresh style, where the focus isn't on catching the ball, or even seeing the ball, but instead the focus is on that icon of football---the goal post. This is the kind of fresh, brash images I was capturing all game. If I had to use one word to describe it: "Magic." I was so in 'the zone." ;-) Not every shot I took was a shot of the goal post. I actually had some where you could see the ball, and I can tell you without reservation, that they are pretty darn unimpressive. In fact, I spent four quarters creating some of the most average, uninspired, and down right yawners…


At the request of a bunch of leaders, we have officially EXTENDED the leader upload deadline to this Sunday Night at 12:00 am EDT. So, if you led a photo walk as part of my 4th annual Worldwide Photo Walk, then the deadline for getting your entries in to me for judging is now....Sunday at 12:00 am Midnight EDT.  I'll be choosing a winner, and 10 finalists from leaders around the world on November 11, 2011. The winner will receive their choice of either a Full Conference Pass to the Photoshop World Conference & Expo or a 1-year Online Subscription, a one-year NAPP membership, and the Full Library of Kelby Books. The 10 Finalists will all receive a 1-year NAPP membership and subscription to Photoshop User magazine. Here's how to enter: Simply log in to your leader account at and go to your Photo Walk page. There…

Hey gang, Brad Moore here with the latest goings-on! Jeremy Cowart on The Grid On Thursday, November 17, we will be airing a special edition of The Grid featuring Jeremy Cowart. Jeremy will join Scott on the show to talk about Help-Portrait, the movement that began a few years ago which gives photographers the opportunity to give back to their community. This year's event will take place December 10, and you can find all the info on how to be part of it over at! Kelby Training Live Here are the upcoming dates for all of the Kelby Training Live seminars. Come out and see us! Light It. Shoot It. Retouch It. Live! with Scott Kelby - Nov 14: S. San Francisco - Nov 21: Seattle - Dec 2: Washington DC Lightroom 3 Live Tour with Matt Kloskowski - Nov 7: Arlington -…

[Editor's Note: Luanne recently attended the prestigious Eddie Adams Workshop, and when she returned told me all about it. Her excitement was so infectious, I asked her to share her experience with everyone here! -Brad] The Eddie Adams Workshop In photography we often set out to capture the Decisive Moment. That sliver of life where time seems to stop and every element of the frame just makes sense. The minute I stepped off the school bus and heard Kodachrome by Paul Simon playing over the loud speakers, and I saw photo greats clapping for me and 99 other selected students as I walked up the hill to the barn at the Eddie Adams Workshop, I knew I was living my Decisive Moment. I had spent the last 5 years dreaming of the day. Wondering what it would feel like, what color team I’d be…