Category Archives Lightroom


My buddy Larry Becker took this pano with his iPhone of the scene at the historic Tampa Theater during the final US stop of my “Light it, Shoot it, Retouch it” tour this past Tuesday.

Really had a fun day (and the theater was an amazing venue for a class like this). I have one tour date left, Saturday April 28th in London, England (I already have two hundred+ photographers signed up for the event).

Hope you can join me there (link).

That’s right!!!! Lightroom 4, the official shipping version, has been released today AND for the first time in Lightroom’s history, Adobe has lowered the price from $299 down to just $149 for the full version, (and only $79 for the upgrade). Also, the European pricing has been brought in-line with US pricing (Just 109 Euros [+VAT] for the full version and 62  [+VAT] for the upgrade).

Matt Kloskowski and I are hosting a free live Q&A today, and we’ll be showing some cool Lightroom 4 stuff, and doing giveaways (including a copy of my soon-to-be-released book, “The Lightroom 4 Book for Digital Photographers” (I’ve already written the entire book, and it’s in production right now).

When: Today at 12:00 noon ET
Why: Because Lightroom 4 is here, baby!

Hope to see you there! :-)

I’ve been working with Lightroom 4 Public Beta quite a bit (OK, a bunch), and I can tell you exactly why I think this there is going to be a tidal wave of people upgrading to Lightroom 4 when it comes out, and it’s the most basic reason of all: Your photos look better processed in Lightroom 4. Period.

At the end of the day, that’s what we all want. We just want our photos to look better, and if somebody comes up with something that can make our photos look significantly better, we’re going to be all over it. Lightroom 4 does exactly that.

The improvements in Lightroom’s Development module are so significant, and so much better than what we’ve ever had before, that I think you’ll be hard-pressed to find most anyone still using Lightroom 3 in just a few months from now. In fact, if they didn’t add another feature, it would still be worth the upgrade just to get better looking images. If you haven’t downloaded the beta, here’s the link—see for yourself. :)

Today at 10am, 12pm, 2pm, and 4pm EST, join Matt Kloskowski and Lightroom Product Manager Tom Hogarty for the unveiling of The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 Beta!

Tune in at to get the scoop on all the latest features, enhancements, and updates from one of the leading experts on Lightroom, and the person who oversees its development, and get some of your questions answered.

You can download and check out the Lightroom 4 Beta right here, and check out the NAPP Lightroom Beta 4 Launch Center, and get more details over at Matt’s blog,!

At every seminar we do, at the end of the day we ask the participants to fill out an evaluation form, to let us know how we did, but most importantly what we can do to make the day even better. I know those eval forms are a pain in the butt to fill out, but after the seminar I personally read every single one of them. I want to find out what’s resonating with the participants, what they want more of, what they want less of, and what I can add or take away that would make the day better.

I take this stuff really seriously
In fact, there are four things I changed, tweaked and added in Orlando, Cologne, and Amsterdam that came directly from the eval forms from my seminars in Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver. In fact, I shot a special on location video for my seminar just to be able to add more about shooting with off-camera hot-shoe flash. I also added a product shoot to the day, and I adjusted the amount of time, and type of retouching I’m doing in the sessions—all based on their feedback.

What I learned in Germany and Holland
As I mentioned yesterday, I know people are struggling with light meters, and I’m going to try to find a way to incorporate enough about using a flash meter in the day to at least clear some of the fog and confusion—even just a bit (including a great tip from Frank Doorhof’s presentation in Amsterdam). I’m also going to post a short demo-video they can watch afterward to help them get up and running from scratch. Hey, it’s a start.

The Whole “Lightroom vs Bridge” thing
Matt Kloskowski and I wound up doing something earlier this year to help our seminar participants with the confusion a lot of them are experiencing because they have the Bridge and Camera Raw, so they figure they don’t need Lightroom. We did this in response to question after question about this at our seminars, and so we create one hundred 60-second or less short video clips called “100 ways Lightroom kicks the Bridge’s A$$!” Even though it was made for our seminar attendees, you can watch it right here.

Overthinking and Making the Hidden Stuff More Discoverable
Yesterday, in Part One, I mentioned how a lot of folks seemed to be overthinking all this lighting and Photoshop stuff, and some stuff they want to do is already there—-in Photoshop and Lightroom—it’s just hidden beneath the surface. To that end, I’m going to step-up my crusade to make all this stuff more accessible, more fun and just plain easier. I want to be the guy that lifts the veil from some of this hidden stuff, and I really want to make learning Photoshop and Lightroom less of a mystery and more of pleasure.

I wasn’t judging—I was just reporting
Yesterday I mentioned that nobody ever asks about Creativity, or Composition, or Art, or any of those types of things at the seminars—it’s all pretty much questions about watt power, sync speeds, Photoshop techniques, and stuff like that. More technical stuff. I wasn’t judging—I was just reporting on that fact.

That being said, I’m working on a new project about Photo Composition
Although I don’t get asked a lot about composition in my live seminars, I know from emails and comments that a lot of photographers out there are struggling with it, and recently I had kind of an epiphany about teaching the art of photographic composition (and why every book on the topic teaches it pretty much the same way it has always been taught—-rule of thirds, leading lines, and so on). However, I think I’ve come up with a brand new way of teaching photo composition that I’ve never seen anyone teach ever, and I think has a chance to help photographers in a really impactful and groundbreaking way.

I’m going to start this project by inviting about 150 photographers to join me one evening, in a beautiful outdoor amphitheater in Tampa, Florida, as I present this one-hour class on composition (which will also be taped for Kelby Training Online). More on this as we lock down a date, but it’s the very next class I want to produce, and I’m really excited about it.

I need your feedback
I’m heading down to Miami with my tour next Monday, and then to Denver, Portland, Los Angeles, and Philly—-all in September. If you come out to join me for any of those days, you’ll benefit from all the people who filled out evaluation forms at all the seminars prior to that. But that’s the great part of doing an on-going tour—you get to tweak and improve it as you go. If you do come out, take an extra minute and let me know what’s working and what you want added, so the tour can continue to evolve and grow.

I don’t have all the answers
I don’t have half of them. But I really want to help, and I’ll do everything I can to help you get the most out of your photography, out of lighting, Photoshop, Lightroom, and just enjoying all of these awesome tools we get to use today. Thanks everybody. Your comments on those eval forms, and here on the blog, truly do make a difference.