Category Archives Misc

Today is Memorial Day in the United States, and our offices are closed as we honor and remember those who gave their lives in service to our country. (Photo credit:

This post is also dedicated each year to the memory of David Leimbach, (brother of our friend and colleague Jeff Leimbach), who died three years ago in combat in Afghanistan.

Just a humble word of thanks to the dedicated men and women of our armed services and to all those who came before them who laid down their lives to protect the freedoms we enjoy each day.

P.S. If you have a moment; Moose Peterson has a very fitting post which features not only some amazing World War II Aircraft Facts & Statistics, but some wonderful aviation photos of these warbirds in action as well. Here’s the link.

Hey everyone! RC here.  I wanted to give you guys a quick update on the launch of Scott’s new portfolio section and answer a couple of questions while I had a moment.

Before I do, I did want to share with you guys a heartfelt thank you for all of the suggestions and comments that we had on the port launch.  One of the things that makes us very proud and grateful is having such engaging and enthusiastic readers here on the blog.  I know that Scott appreciates all of your comments – and takes his time in going over every one of them.  You guys really look out for this place – and it totally shows.

I figured this would be a cool time to share with you guys some of the changes that we’ve made to the port, some of the changes we’re looking into, and answer some of your questions/feedback.

Things we’ve changed so far

We’ve made it so that the portfolio stretches to 100% of your screen:

Those of you who are looking at the website with a large monitor should see more of the images going from edge to edge.   I think it really does add to the viewing experience.

Kept the logo and navigation constant on the page:

When you are using the scrollbar to move across to the right of the page, you should still see the logo and navigation on the top of the page.  This will work on desktop computers.  The iPad’s being a little fussy with things, so as I get a better way to keep that navigation handy, i’ll implement that in there too.

Landscape Has a Title:

This was one of those moments where I said “ugh.. I should’ve picked that one up”.  It’s funny, cause the Title tag on HTML is usually one of those afterthoughts when i’m working in a page.  Jokingly, I always said to myself (and others) “its one of those things that’s important.. but really gets no attention.”  Later on in the afternoon yesterday I tweeted “Ever wonder how important the Title tag is on a page?  Forget about writing one.. you’ll see. :) ”

Centering the Page

This was a straightforward fix.. and does look good on the site. :)

Things We’re Looking Into

Next and Previous Items using Javascript:

Adding some function that allows you to hit an arrow for next and previous is a very quick way to get some functionality into the page.  The problem here is that the genesis for the change was to create something that had a very specific feel and look on the iPad side.  Changes that you make in Javascript (or more recently- JQuery) can be easy to implement on the desktop side, but may not translate well over to the iPad side of things.  It’s bad enough to have to crosscheck Safari, Firefox, Chrome, and IE on both the PC and Mac side – now we’re adding iPad to the mix.  As I get something that I think will work on this side, i’ll be sure to post it up.

The other thing to keep in mind here is the full screen experience.  If we wanted to only see one picture on the page and wait for the next one, it would mean that the “window” that we see the image in would have to be a specific size.  Let’s say we choose 600 pixels for a landscape. What happens when the next image is a pano? Or, what if the next image is a portrait – well short of the 600 pixels in width for that window.  This would mean that the user would be put in a position to see a picture, click next, see a picture, click next, and so forth. This was a behavior that we had in both the Jquery based portfolio we had earlier (for the ipad) as well as the Flash implementation we worked on.  In the end – the client (in this case, Scott) wanted a smoother experience for the images – which is why we’re leaning in this direction.

Going Back to the Beginning

Im playing around with getting a button at the end of the slideshow to bring the user back to the beginning of the series.  Again, making this for the desktop is pretty easy – JQuery has some built in functonality to animate some slides (or can be added with getting some functionality like jQuery.ScrollTo) but this is something that has limited success on the iPad.  Because of the direction we’re trying to go with this here, it’s something that I’d put on the “lets see how we can make it better”


Why wasnt this portfolio done in WordPress?

One of the things Scott wanted to be able to do here is have a barebones, easy to use way to show off his images that worked well on the desktop and lended itself well to showcasing images on his iPad.  While its totally possible that we could design a child theme in WordPress or setup a new install of WordPress that would manage the portfolio – it just seemed like it was more than what we needed here.  The portfolio here is really managed through a series of HTML files, and adding something to this is as easy as uploading the image, adding a line of code, and being done with it.  Would a WordPress install be easier?  Hard to say.. you’d still have to upload a file, and still have to add it to the portfolio.  At that point -where- it was being done seemed moot.  This gives him a small, non database dependent, simple way to get the images up.  Yes, it -could- have been done in WordPress – but this option wasn’t bad either.  It becomes preference, then.

Dreamweaver Sites are so 1990’s (or 2002, depending on what comment you read) Via Claude and Lynn:

I don’t really use -when- a technology was used as a barometer for whether it’s going to be useful to work with. I just use the ‘is this going to work for this scenario’ method of implementing it.  There are tons of sites that are still being developed in Dreamweaver – and to date it is a VERY powerful tool for someone who wants to have control of even the smallest components.  That said – the solution here seemed easier to implement on Dreamweaver.  One of the things people may not know is that Scott is actually quite adept in Dreamweaver, so it’s not like he would be in unfamiliar territory.

I like WordPress as a development platform – heck I even wrote a book on it not too long ago.  My own personal site is on it ( and I *gasp* even use a Flash Gallery for it.  It’s a great tool.. but its one of several tools.  While WordPress may be a “dream” to use.. this is just as good.

PS.  Went to your site on an iPad – tried to use the thumbnails.  They didn’t work.  Might want to check that out – figured i’d give my two cents for a change. :)

Could we have built a Flash site, that with a bit of code, switched to a iPad Friendly site?

Sure could have.. in fact that’s what we were doing for a while here!  We had a flash site, with an autodetect that moved people over to a jQuery based website for iOS folk.  We just decided to do something different.  That mode worked very well – and I promote it heavy in my book.

Could we Implement a JS hack to paginate through the Portfolio?

We could – but most of these hacks still use vertical pages as a measure and move downward.  Trying to move them across an iFrame using anchors and/or scroll by X amount functions doesnt play nice on iOS devices.  That’s not to say we -can’t-.  That’s just to say I want to find the best way to do it so we do it for all browsers.

Could we make something that just updates the images from Lightroom?

I’ve been asking for a feature in the Bridge and LR web galleries that just updates the images and not the HTML FOREVER now, and have got no response.  Even if someone made an HTML gallery for images, made some tweaks to the HTML code and published it, it would all get erased during the next export.  One checkbox that said “update image references/ not the index.htm” would be killer.. alas.. nada yet.


One of the things that I thought was great about making the portfolio, and reading through the comments is the amount of considerations that need to be made when working on a website.  As a designer, you need to leverage quite a bit of things before you really need to code.  Audience, technology, interpreted devices, statistics (did you know that 1280×1024 is about 7% of the population.  The next higher resolution? 8%), and on top of that, the wishes of the client.  Factoring in all of that makes for a great “What if we did this.. ” moment because there is always something else to factor into that decision.

Thankfully, it’s what makes doing all of this so much fun.  And i’m ever grateful for that. :)


Thanks to everyone who pointed out the problem with the RSS feed for this blog. I’m not quite certain why it happened, but whatever it was, I think (hope) we have it fixed now. If not, just let me know, and somehow we’ll track it down.

(By the way; that RSS graphic above, courtesy of, fits the “RSS Gone Wild” headline better than you might think, because once you get to my age, having a box of popcorn like that [with all its salt, saturated fat, butter, empty calories, carbs, and everything else that makes it taste incredibly yummy like you can’t believe] is literally living on the wild side). Man, this getting older stuff is a blast (but of course, it beats the alternative). ;-)

Sorry about that. Now back to your regularly scheduled somethin’ er other.

I thought I’d kick off the first blog post of the new year with a quick look back at the most popular, and most commented-on posts of 2010, and some of the fun stuff we shared during the past year.

The Top 10 Most Commented-on Posts of 2010
Here are the posts that garnered the most comments from readers during the year, in order:

  1. How US Airways Just Lost Yet Another Customer (link)
    This was the #1 most-commented post with nearly 400 comments. This was just one of those “I have to get this off my chest” type of posts, and I never dreamed it would get that kind of response (but apparently, I wasn’t alone on this one). Here’s the rest in order.
  2. What I’d love to see in Lightroom 4 (link)
  3. HDR Quote of the week (link)
  4. Why is everybody so angry about Apple’s iPad (link)
  5. What they’re not telling you about HDR Images (link)
  6. To Correct or Not To Correct? (link)
  7. When will we finally get frames and mats for digital camera images sizes? (link)
  8. US Airways Responds (link)
    This post was a follow-up to the original post, where I reported that USAir had contacted me and said they would reinstate my miles. Within a few days, they had credited my back miles, and credited my missing miles, and the same day they hit my account I donated all the miles to the Make-A-Wish foundation.
  9. What constitutes an over-the-top HDR shot? (link)
  10. Apple’s iPad and Apple Secret Weapon (link)


Guest Bloggers
I’m indebted to all the Guest Bloggers who shared their images, ideas and inspiration with my readers each Wednesday. Here are the top commented posts from 2010.

  1. Matt Kloskowski’s “Photoshop is not a bad word!” (link)
  2. Alex Walker’s “Parental Sports Photoshop — My Most Fantastic Voyage” (link)
  3. John McWade‘s “Design for Photographers” (link)
  4. Brad Moore’s “The Shot” (link)
  5. Jeremy Cowart’s “Perception” (link)
  6. Peter Eastway’s “What is Photographic Reality?” (link)
  7. RC Concepcion’s “How HDR saved RC’s Star Wars Celebration” (link)
  8. Andy Locascio’s “I never thought it would happen” (link)
  9. Calvin Hollywood’s “I am addicted to Photoshop” (link)
  10. Jasmine Star’s “Optimal Wedding Timeline” (link)


My Photo Shoots
When I do a shoot, I usually post the images here within a day or so, and here are the shoots that garnered the most comments from 2010 (in order of popularity):

  1. Back from 16 days in China (link)
  2. NFL Sidelines Shoot: Bucs vs Rams (along with my sports camera settings) (link)
  3. Shooting the NBA Bulls vs. Cavs (link)
  4. NFL Sidelines Shoot: Steelers vs. Jets (link)
  5. A few shots from my week in Maine (link)
  6. Behind the scenes at a major sports shoot (link)
  7. College Football Sidelines Shoot: LSU/North Carolina (link)
  8. Shooting the Indy Grand Prix of Alabama (link)
  9. I’m back from 9 days in Barcelona, Spain (link)
  10. It’s Fashion-shoot Monday (link)
  11. My first Soccer shoot (link)

While not technically a “shoot” the post I wrote about my New Online Portfolio Design (link) got more comments any of the shoots.


Other Milestones
This year we saw seven new books produced by Kelby Training launch here on the blog (four from me and two from some of the best in the business today.  Here they are (in no particular order);

1. David Ziser’s “Captured By The Light” book for wedding photographers.
David wrote the definitive book on the topic. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a photography book with a better review rating on 67 5-star reviews, and one just that just hated it (there’s one in every crowd).

2. My Lightroom 3 Book for Digital Photographers
This one was a lot of work, and I added a new “Lightroom Killer Tips” section to each chapter, but I’m so passionate about Lightroom that it made this major rewrite a lot of fun for me.

3. The iPhone 4 Book (co authored with my good friend Terry White)
There are two things I love about this book: (1) It causes me to really learn my new phone inside and out, and (2) We split the book in two, each writing half the chapters, and I love the fact that Terry takes all the hard chapters.

4. Captured: The journal of a wildlife photographer, by Moose Peterson
Moose did something in this book that I think few people have ever accomplished with their books—he shared his most important techniques for capturing wildlife in a very straightforward way, and he captivated the reader with simply amazing photography, and weaved throughout the book is the story of his life and his career shooting nature. Brilliantly executed, and not surprisingly it’s become one of the most highly acclaimed books of the year.

5. My Photoshop CS5 for Digital Photographers
Adobe made my job really easy on this book, as CS5 was almost tailor-made for photographers, but as an author, I had to make some difficult decisions about how to develop this new version, one being my decision to remove the chapters about Adobe Bridge from the printed book and move them online (updated for the minor Bridge tweaks in CS5), and instead focus on the “Mini-Bridge” built- in to Photoshop CS5. This gave me more room to cover new features, and workflow stuff, without overly bloating the book. This decision of what to cut becomes more difficult with each new version, but I’m happy with how it came out.

6. My Photoshop Elements 9 book (co authored with my good buddy and ace Call of Duty: Black Ops teammate Matt Kloskowski)
This book is tough to do for the totally opposite reason of my CS5 book. Adobe doesn’t add a ton of new features to Elements in each rev, so what Matt and I do instead is add the new things that we have learned during the year, and we take the techniques we use in CS5 each day and try to convert them into techniques that work in Elements, and that has worked wonderfully well (based on feedback from readers).

7. My “Photo Recipes Live 2” Book/DVD Combo
This one skated in just under the wire—shipping right before the end of the year. I shot this down in Miami over a two-day period, and tried some new stuff and more ambitious lighting set-ups, along with some fun location lighting shoots, and I think it turned out even better than Photo Recipes 1 (which I guess is always the goal, right?


Taking Time Off
This year I did a lot of new projects,  books, new classes, I was out on tour for both Lightroom 3 and Photoshop CS5, and I taught at  Photoshop World, and did workshops, and just a lot of training-related stuff this past year. Of course I want to share all my projects with my readers, so every time a book comes out, or I do a seminar, I would mention it here on my blog (after all, I want my readers to come out to my seminars, and read my books, and watch my online classes, and so on).

Well, some weeks I’d have two or three things to mention, and it starts to seem like (to me and you) that that’s all I’m talking about, so I tried to consolidate all my training and book stuff onto just one day a week—Thursday—which we now affectionately call “Pimpy Thursday.”

Thankfully, my photo assistant Brad Moore stepped up to be the person who actually compiles and writes the post each Pimpy Thursday, which gave me a break during the week I so desperately needed (thank you Brad!). This let me focus more on shooting and other fun stuff during the rest of week (though sometimes, because of timing, I still wind up having to find a mid-week pimping in, I try to wait until Thursday if at all possible).

2010 has been a year of huge growth and expansion at Kelby Media Group, and during all that, blogging four days a week was really starting to take a toll on me. I actually missed a few days of blogging during year (I called in “lame” 5 days with essentially nothing to say, or no time to say, including 2 days during Photoshop World), and I had one sick day in Jan of 2010 where I didn’t blog, but outside of that, between Brad, my Guest Bloggers and I, we pretty much kept the ship afloat all year long.

My most surprising fact about me from 2010
I went to my calendar and looked, and believe it or not, I took nearly EIGHT weeks of vacation with my family this year! (Whooo hooo!), and I didn’t work a lick on any of it (which is even better). Yet, I got quite a bit done in 2010 anyway. Maybe I should take more time off in 2011? ;-)

We Did Some Really Important Stuff, Too!
Besides all the fun stuff, and discussions, and controversy (HDR & iPad) we did some really important stuff, as the readers of this blog donated literally tens of thousands of dollars to help feed and cloth the orphans of the Springs of Hope Orphanage in Kenya (the very orphanage my readers helped to build from an empty plot of land in 2009).

You guys bought Photo Walk t-shirts, we raffled off one of my guitars (signed by all the Photoshop guys), and you guys generously gave to some wonderful, deserving kids on the other side of the world. Ya done good gang!

More 2010 highlights to come on Thursday
I’m planning on running my 2nd annual “Best of” awards on Thursday to celebrate the best of all kinds of stuff, so I hope you’ll join me then.

One more thing….
I couldn’t do any of this without wonderful readers like yourselves, who make doing all this so worthwhile. You guys are as forthcoming and helpful and sharing as an blog author could hope for from his readers, and it’s very gratifying to see the wonderful community that has grown here. I consider it a real privilege to be able to get together with you here each week and I hope you’ll continue to check back during 2011—a year that truly hope will be your best yet!

For Christmas, I wanted to share something very special—a short video clip (below) put together by two very talented guys from our video team: Adam Rohrmann and Daniel Bryant, and hosted by our own RC Concepcion. The video gives you a behind-the-scenes look at our small part in Jeremy Cowart’s amazing Help Portrait day. I hope you’ll take a moment to watch the video. It’s what this season is all about.

Here’s wishing you and your family a warm and wonderful Holiday and all the joy His Season can bring.