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  • Category Archives Photo Gear

    Nikon has just released a new site, called the "Nikon D-Movie Screening Room" that features high-definition video clips shot entirely with their DSLR's that have built-in video capabilities (the Nikon D90 and D5000 cameras). I have to say, it's pretty amazing to see what can be done, thanks to the ability to use Nikon camera lenses (and the shallow depth of field that the right lens can bring), and if you've ever wondered what all the fuss is about on putting video in DSLRs, this will make you a believer. Here's the link----take two minutes and check it out.

    I'm calling this a "First Look" review because I've only gotten one opportunity to really work with this pack, but since I did use it out in the field (I did an on-location shoot for a book project), I wanted to give you my first impressions. The Problem If you wanted to take studio lightning on location, you could do it but there two problems: 1. You had to buy special strobe heads that were designed to work with on-location battery packs 2. Good quality location kits are VERY expensive (you were lucky to get a decent single head and a battery pack for around $1,200). The Dream Use your own existing regular studio strobes and take them on location. Unfortunately, monoblocks (also called monolights) are strobes that are designed to be plugged right into the wall like any other appliance, so they don't…

    I've been wanting to try out Lastolite's new Kickerlite ever since I read about it back around the Photokina time frame, and while doing some shoots for my Digital Photography book, Volume 3 , I finally got a chance to use it, and I have to say, it's surprisingly sweet (and a lot better than I thought it was going to be by just looking at it and reading the description of what it's supposed to do). So, here's how it works: it sits on the floor in front of your subject (as seen above---photo by Brad Moore) and it's in the shape of a wedge aiming up at your subject (kind of like a vocal monitor for all you rock heads out there) and it kind of looks like a softbox. There's a horizontal H-shaped pole and flash bracket in the back where…

    Think Tank's Airport Security 2 Gets a "Scott Thinks It's Hot!" Award My recent trips to Birmingham and DLWS in the Other Banks totally cemented it----the Think Tank Airport Security 2 is the rolling camera bag of my dreams. It has totally replaced my beloved Lowe Pro Pro Roller 1, which served me well for the past two years, but this Think Tank rolling bag is truly that next level of bag, and now there's no looking back. I'm still amazed at how that bag holds as much as it does (I load mine with a 200-400mm f/4 lens, a large 24-70mm f/2.8 lens, a large 14-24mm f/2.8 lens, a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens, two full-sized camera bodies, an Epson P-7000, two chargers, a monopod, an SB-900, multiple filters, a Di-GPS unit, and loads of little gadgets that wind up in our camera bags). Besides…

    So after I shot the Honda Superbike Races on Sunday in Birmingham, I hopped a flight (well, two flights), up to Kitty Hawk, North Carolina to be a part of Moose Peterson's DLWS (Digital Landscape Workshop Series) "Outer Banks" workshop, which kicked off Sunday night (I'm not teaching; I just came to shoot and hang out with my buddies Moose, Joe McNally, and Laurie Excell, and I had a blast (That's right; I did this morning's sunrise shoot then headed to the airport to head back home). They're still going to shoot sunset today and sunrise tomorrow, but I've got to head back home, see the kids, and then get ready for my Down & Dirty tour in DC (which was sold out last Friday with over 700 people for the day). Also with me was the 'Bad Man' himself, Brad Moore (who used…

    I finally got around to covering a question that I get asked so often from readers here on the blog, and that is: "What is the difference between off camera flash (like a Nikon SB-800 or SB-900, or a Canon 580 EXII), and a Studio Strobe?" If I have time, I sometimes answer people back with a direct email, but I've gotten this question so many times, I haven't been able to answer them all. So, I thought I'd put together an example to show you my typical response to the question, which is purely my own opinion on the subject. What I usually say is something along the lines of: "Whether you use a small off-camera flash, or a studio strobe, what you get is a bright flash of white light aiming toward your subject." I know that sounds pretty simplistic, but that's…

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