Category Archives Mobile Apps

You guys know I’m a big fan of Lightroom Mobile, and for the past few months I’ve been working on a Lightroom Mobile book, and I’m excited to announce it launches today!

Here’s the link to pick up your copy:

> Amazon (in print or Kindle edition)
> Barnes & Noble

…and of course it’s in bookstores now, so you can find it wherever cool books on Lightroom are sold.

I hope you’ll give it a look – I went really in-depth on the book, and I think it’s going to help a lot of people.

Just 12 days to my 9th Annual Worldwide Photo Walk
If you haven’t signed up for a walk, – now’s the time – we have over 1,000 photo walks in cities all around the world. Come sign up (it’s free, and open to everybody!).

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New this year: the “Video Shot During the Photo Walk” competition
And our awesome sponsor, Canon USA, has put together an amazing prize for the winner of this category — They are giving away a Canon Video Creator Kit (seen above), to the best video submitted from the walk (the video has to be created during the official photo walk). The kit includes the new Canon EOS 80D Body; their new 18-135mm lens; a Canon Power Zoom AdapterRODE VideoMic Go; a 32G SD Card, and all the other goodies (battery, charger, strap, etc.). 

What could be a better start for your week than helping some Orphans?
We’re at about 25% of our donation goal, but you can get us a lot closer. Here’s the link to donate to the Springs of Hope Orphanage (built with the help of donations from people who read this blog, and who participate in the Worldwide Photo Walk each year). Thank you in advance for having a giving heart.

OK, I’m off to Minneapolis…
for my seminar there on Wednesday, then I’m heading to Milwaukee on Friday. Busy week! Thanks to everybody who visited my Exposure page about my Iceland trip – if you didn’t get by there, here’s the link.

Catch you all here on Wednesday (or in Minneapolis)!

Best,

-Scott

Hi Gang and Happy Monday. I’m on my way out to Seattle today for my seminar tomorrow, and then I’m off to Portland, Oregon for my seminar there, Friday, but before I head out here’s a little tip for a more readable, better-looking Instagram feed, and this tips works about 70% of the time (see below for more on the 70% thing).

Adding Line Breaks to Your Captions
This tip is for when your caption is a little long, or for when you want to separate your hashtags from the rest of your caption (of course, you can post all your hashtags as the first comment, but that’s a different tip). Anyway, it’s a little hidden how to do this on an iPhone, so that’s what I thought I’d share today.

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Above: Notice those two glorious line breaks above? Sure makes reading your caption easier. 

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Above: To add a line break; on an iPhone; tap the “123” button on the keyboard (shown circled above in red).

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Above: That brings up the number keyboard, and with it a “Return” key (circled in red above). Place your cursor where you want it; tap the Return key, and it creates a line break. 

NOTE: Remember the 70% thing I mentioned before? Well, when I went back to older posts and added these line breaks to make long captions more readable, it didn’t work in every case — even though it appeared to work while editing the caption; sometimes when I tapped the “Done” button the line breaks which it just showed, completely went away (by the way — adding line breaks doesn’t just make the text more readable — by taking one long caption and breaking it into shorter blocks of text, the chances of people reading your caption at all go way up because little blocks of text make the time it takes to read the caption seem shorter to people, so they’re more likely to read it in the first place).

Hope you find that helpful (and I hope if you’re on Instagram you’ll follow me there — I post travel photography shots there daily). I’m @scottkelby on Instagram.

Hope you have a better-than-average Monday, we’ll catch ya here tomorrow.

Best,

-Scott

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Hi gang: When I seriously started using Instagram last year, I decided that I wanted to use it to share just my travel photography (I basically shoot three photo categories: travel, people and sports), and to get the kind of content I want to have one there (rather than just random shots from my iPhone’s built-in camera) that meant sharing images I’ve taken with my DSLR, and while that seems like a simple thing to do, it’s a bit clunkier than you’d think, which is probably why I get so many questions on what my workflow actually is, so that’s what I’m sharing here today.

Now, I will tell you this – my workflow is constantly evolving, and the one I’m using now I learned from my buddy Terry White (from Adobe), and it works like a charm as long as you’re a Lightroom user, so I’ll share my current workflow first, then I’ll share a workflow that is clunkier, but you can use without using Lightroom. Here we go:

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STEP ONE: The travel images I want to post to Instagram are already on my desktop computer, in my Lightroom CC catalog, so I created a collection with the final images I want to post to Instagram, and I sync that catalog to Lightroom mobile on my iPhone.

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STEP TWO: In Lighroom Mobile on my iPhone, I go to that sync’d collection; click on the image I want to share to Instagram (it’s already tweaked, sharpened and ready to go if it’s in that collection), then (1) I tap the Share icon at the top right corner of Lightroom Mobile, but I don’t choose “Share” from the pop-up menu that appears — (2) choose “Open In” (because you’ll need to open this selected image in the Instagram App).

NOTE: you can actually make this just a three-tap process by tapping and holding on the thumbnail of the image you want to post while you’re in the collection view and that menu you see above pops right now. You can watch a short video of how this works over on our YouTube page today (the video is only 24-seconds I believe). Here’s the link. 

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STEP THREE: When you do this, a list of apps open that you can open your selected image in; choose “Copy to Instagram” as shown above.

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STEP FOUR: Now your image from Lightroom Mobile appears in Instagram and you’re ready go to.

NON-LIGHTROOM WORKFLOW
This is the clunky workflow I was using before – you don’t need Lightroom Mobile for it, but it takes a few steps. Here goes:

(1) Find the JPEG image on your computer that you want to share to Instagram.

(2) Save that image into either Dropbox (if you’re a subscriber) or if you’re a Mac user using iCloud, save your image to iCloud Drive (this is what I used to do).

(3) Now go to the iCloud Drive app on your iPhone – click on the image you want to use; click “Download to View” then tap the Share button and choose Save Image. This saves your image to your iPhone’s Camera Roll.

(4) Lastly, launch the Instagram app; click the “new” post button and the first image that appears is the one you just saved and now you can share it to Instagram.

Whew that was a lot of steps (and you can see why, if you have Lightroom Mobile, it’s a whole lot easier).

Hope you found that helpful on some level, and we’ll see ya tomorrow!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Hey, I’m coming to Seattle and Portland next week with my seminar. Hope I’ll see you there. 

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Mornin’ everybody. I get a steady stream of questions about tethering into Lightroom (that’s where you connect your camera directly to your computer and when you shoot, your images appear really large on screen, instead of seeing them on the tiny 3″ monitor on the back of your camera). So this morning, I thought I’d quickly go through seven things you’ll probably want to know. Here goes:

  1. Not every camera can tether to Lightroom
    Here’s a list from Adobe of the cameras it supports for tethering. It’s pretty much Canon and Nikon cameras, with a few Leica camera models (the tethering in Lightroom requires camera manufacturers to provide Adobe with support for tethering to their cameras, so it’s not something Adobe can just decide to do on their own without their support).
  2. You can “super shrink” or hide the Tether bar (the heads up display)
    If you hold the Option key (PC: Alt key) and click on the little “x” in the top right corner of the bar, it will shrink the bar down to just a shutter button (yes, you can fire your camera’s shutter with that button). If you want to hide the bar altogether (but keep the tethering still active), press Command-T (PC: Ctrl-T).
  3. That Table that holds my laptop is from Tethertools.com
    I always get asked where I got that table. There’s a company called Tethertools that does nothing but create accessories for people who tether, like the table. They also make an optional little slot under the table for holding an external hard drive; and (my favorite) a nicely designed pop-out drink holder (it’s handier than you’d think).
  4. How to recover from a stall
    At some point, without warning, your tethering will just stop. It’s not your fault, but you will have to know how to recover from a “stall.” First, make sure you camera is awake. If it goes to sleep to protect the battery life of the camera, it puts tethering to sleep, too. If waking it doesn’t work — turn the camera on/off. If that doesn’t work, turn off Lightroom’s tethering (choose Stop Tethered Capture from the File menu), and then turn it back on in the same place. Lastly, unplug and replug the USB cable from your camera and your laptop. One of those will usually do the trick and get you back up and running. BTW: my wife is a pilot and takes great umbrage with my use of the phrase “recovering from a stall” for tethering. Just sayin’.
  5. Canon cameras write a copy to the memory card in the camera. Nikon’s don’t.
    It’s just the way they’re set up by the manufacturer — it’s not Adobe showing a preference. On my 5D Mark III it writes to the compact flash card in the camera and I dig that because it gives me an automatic backup as I shoot, which is nice. NOTE: if you have trouble tethering to Nikon — try popping the card out of the camera.
  6. You might already have the cable you need to tether
    Nearly all cameras ship with the exact cable you need to tether — it’s simply a USB cable with a mini USB on one end (that connects to the mini-USB port on your camera) and a regular USB on the other to plug into your computer. So, go look in the box your camera came in (it’s in your closet) to see if you kept it (you probably did). If you didn’t, you can buy a USB cable online — just ask for one with a mini USB on one end, and a regular USB on the other. The one I use (the long orange cable seen above), is from tethertools. It’s orange so you can see it easier in a dark studio.
  7. Once tethered, you can do live client proofing to an iPad
    You can hand your client an iPad and have them see images from your shoot live on the iPad as you’re shooting (btw: clients super love this!). Not only that — they can see the shoot live on the Web, even if they’re not there (or, if they are there, they can share the shoot with a colleague or friend off site. I have a short video that explains the entire process below.

Hope you find that helpful, and hope it inspires you to give tethering a try. Once you do, you can’t imagine not tethering (yes, it’s that good!).

Best,

-Scott

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This week we were very fortunate to have Adobe’s own Bryan O’Neil Hughes in our studios (he was taping a KelbyOne class on using Adobe’s Mobile Apps, plus he did a live private Webcast exclusively for our members, and he was also my guest on The Grid on Wednesday). Basically, Bryan didn’t get much sleep  this week.

Anyway, if you missed any of this…
I’ve got the next best thing, which are some short clips where Bryan is giving you a glimpse of the power of some of these amazing apps (and once you see them, you’ll be even more amazed to learn that Adobe makes all of these apps available for FREE!).

Take a look at these three short videos (below) on these mobile apps in the Photoshop family: Photoshop Fix, Photoshop Mix, and Photoshop Sketch. (I’ll share some more app videos next week). A lot of folks were literally blown away at what these apps are able to do, and how they extend the power of editing your images to mobile. Really incredible stuff (and thanks Bryan for an incredible week of learning Adobe’s awesome free mobile apps).

We’re cooking up lots of cool training on mobile apps, including classes on Lightroom Mobile at this summer’s Photoshop Conference 2016 in Las Vegas (Bryan will be teaching there again this year), so I hope you can make it. If you’re a KelbyOne member, and you sign up before June 10th, you can get a full conference pass for all three days, with nearly 100 sessions to choose from, for just $599. Here’s the link with details.

Hope you all have a great weekend, and we’ll see ya back here on Monday!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. I’m off to London today and I’ll be speaking at “The Photography Show” on Monday and Tuesday. I hope to meet you in person there. Can’t wait! :)

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