Category Archives Photography

Anyway, I finally got them together and I hope you’ll have a sec to check them out. Here’s the link. https://spark.adobe.com/page/kY4DWLrcs928p/

It’s taken me a few weeks to get these together — I was on a critical book deadline, but the book is done, and there’s time for fun (that would make such a great start for a “book author’s rap song”).

We also wound up in Belfast, Ireland and Iceland for day as well, so I threw a few of those shots in as well.

Have you signed up to join your local Photo Walk yet?

Now’s the time! We have approved nearly 900 cities so far around the world to host photo walks as part of my 12th Annual Worldwide Photo Walk on Saturday, October 5, 2019. Click here to go to the official site and see if there’s a walk organized near you. If not, maybe you should be the one to lead one? Click the same link for details on leading a walk.

This is going to be a great day, and an awesome week!

Let’s make the most of it. Hope yours is a great one!

-Scott

Happy Friday, everybody! Here’s what’s up:

OK, I finally got a new lens!

I unboxed it live on The Grid on Wednesday when it came in from B&H.

It’s been a while since I’ve bought a new lens, so…ya know…I was due. LOL! This is my first in Canon’s mirrorless R-mount line of lenses that match up with its EOS R mirrorless bodies. It’s the just-released 24-240mm f/4-6.4, and this is my new travel lens.

Here’s why I bought it:

(1) I can get my travel rig down in weight considerably, because I won’t be lugging my heavy 70-200mm f/2.8 with me to China next week. Just this lens, and my 16-35mm f/4 (which will hopefully be replaced with a soon to be shipping 15-35mm R-Mount lens).

(2) I won’t have to use the Adapter with this new lens since it’s built for the EOR R mirrorless.

(3) From the reviews I’ve read, it’s absolutely tack-sharp edge to edge! The lenses Canon has been releasing for their mirrorless line have been crazy sharp, and one review I read said it was so good it was worth switching to the EOS just for this lens.

(4) B&H had a killer deal on it — $899. Boom! Done.

(5) Back when I was shooting Nikon, I loved their 28-300mm as my travel lens, but since my switch to Canon six years ago, they haven’t had anything with a similar size and weight, so I got a Tamron 28-300mm that I really like and used a bunch, but this new lens is actually wider, which I love. It’s 24mm rather than 28mm. I can crop the 240mm long end just a little and get to a 300mm equivalent, but you can’t make a 28mm any wider, so starting with a 24mm is a big, big plus in my book.

(6) I love the smaller size. Works great with my Think Tank Photo sling bag. Much better fit than my 70-200mm that’s for sure.

Here’s what I wish were different:

(1) It’s an f/4 to f/6.3, and I would have preferred an f/3.5 to f/5.6. Not a deal breaker, but I’d prefer the variable range I had with my Tamron and Nikon.

(2) Get this — you don’t get a lens hood with it. You have to buy it separately for $35. Oh. Come. On!

I’ll do a field report soon

I’ll have some shots from China soon with it, and I’ve got a location portrait shoot on Monday so I’ll probably bring it as well, and I’ll let you know what I think of it once I take it through its paces.

See what you missed in Vegas!

Check out this video put together by our video crew with highlights from the recent Vegas Photoshop World. If you didn’t get to go, this is what it was like!

We’re one month away from my Worldwide Photo Walk

Well, technically yesterday was one month away because it’s Saturday, October 5th in 1,000+ cities all over the world. It’s free, it’s fun, you oughta come (Hey, that rhymes!). Here’s where to go to see if there’s a photo walk already organized near you (link). If you’re thinking, “What the heck is the Worldwide Photo Walk?” then watch this video (below).

Very Cool Video on Where to Photograph Jets at LAX

Our buddy and rockin’ guitarist Jefferson Graham has been doing a Photowalk series where he shows you cool places to shoot photo walk style, and recently he did a really cool one on where to photograph the big jets coming through LAX. If you’re in photo walks and you’re not following Jeff’s new youtube series, you oughta! Check out his “Hidden LAX” video below and don’t forget to subscribe to his page: Jefferson Graham Photowalk.

Come spend the day with me in Nashville in a few weeks

That’s my crowd in Philly last week. Such a great group – we had a blast!

My “Ultimate Photography Crash Course”full-day seminar is coming to Nashville on Wednesday, Sept. 25th at the Music City Center. It’s just $99 for the full day – includes a detailed workbook of my note, plus it’s100% money-back guaranteed if it’s not the best photography seminar you’ve ever been to, at any price. period. Tickets and details at KelbyOneLive.com (get your tickets now – my Boston seminar last week sold out in advance). 

Have a great, safe, dry weekend everybody!

-Scott

Hey hey! It’s #TravelTuesday with me, Dave Williams, and every week I’m here with something for you from the category lineup of photography, Photoshop, travel, or life. This week: – life. Mine, to be more specific.

First on the agenda, Photoshop World. It was awesome! I had my first PSW class, my “Ten Tips to Help You Create Captivating Travel Images,” and I loved it! I had a great time up on the stage in front of the attendees and it looks as though I had around 200 people in there with me. So, to those who came and to everyone who has followed along on my travels, thank you! Here’s a little look, courtesy of Brad Moore and Mark Heaps.

And, another big thanks to Rachel and the KelbyOne crew for being so ace, and for delivering me a donut onstage!

Now, since Photoshop World it seems life has resumed, which for me means travelling! I’m writing this post from the porch of the Thunderbird Lodge in Chinle, AZ, having woken up in Page and taken a look over the amazing vista at Horseshoe Bend before rolling through the landscape to Monument Valley where I’m currently shooting with Siân Elizabeth on some projects both together and independently. So far so good on that one, but I want to tell you about the little adventure that just finished.

Mark Heaps and I fulfilled a promise. Two years ago we decided we would go on a motorcycle adventure and we have now done that, albeit quite a short and sweet one (but, hopefully, the first of many.)

We collected our Triumph Tigers from Las Vegas Triumph immediately after Photoshop World ended, and we rode straight out into the blazing Nevada and Arizona deserts with one goal in our sights: – Route 66.

For three days we took in the sights on this amazing stretch of the mother road around the Seligman area, and if you didn’t know already, Seligman is perhaps better known as Radiator Springs from the Disney movie Cars. We tested our riding skills with twists and turns, ups and downs, strong side winds and dusty gravel roads, and it was amazing! I’ve been on some cool rides before but this was the most diverse, entertaining, and in some places, challenging motorcycle road trip I’ve had. Mark and I had the opportunity to share our experiences of photography training and of life in general. I already mentioned that we had planned to ride together for a couple of years, but here’s the point: –

One of the most beautiful qualities of friendship is to understand and to be understood. It refreshes the soul. Having the opportunity to share stories and experiences, and then subsequently share and adventure, came off the back of having met online through shared interest and realising we ticked the same tock, and we developed that and took it up a notch. The KelbyOne Community and Photoshop World are a fantastic way not only to learn but to share and to network. Mark and I maximised on it, and I strongly urge you to do the same so that you can click with like-minded people who speak your language, metaphorically and literally, and take on the world together.

Never let your friends get lonely. Keep disturbing them!

Much love

Dave

#TravelTuesday with Dave has come round again, and this week I want to jump into learning photography. I’ve been asked time and again about when I got into photography and where I learned, most recently on the Drobo blog.

I’ve told the story of my first camera many times over: – my parents got me a Nikon F40 for my birthday when I was a teenager. That’s the very short version of the story! If I were starting now, I reckon it’d be a lot quicker to make progress versus back then when I was shooting on film rather than with a screen on the back of the camera. In fact, I recently took hold of a film SLR and it was very strange that there wasn’t a screen back there!

The way I learned to shoot initially was simply by picking up the camera and shooting anything and everything—flowers, my pet dog, landscapes, people, literally anything that happened to get in my way! It was so frustrating, though, because I wasn’t immediately seeing results. Oftentimes, I couldn’t quite remember what I had done when I’d gotten things right and wrong. It was all about making mistakes, then subsequently remembering what the mistakes were!

Me shooting Blesbok in South Africa

When I moved to South Africa I had another camera, as well as my Nikon F40—I had a little digital point-and-shoot. I was learning from both together, taking the “pure photography” skills from what I was doing with the SLR and taking note of composition and colour and various other things from the digital camera, and kind of mangling and intertwining the two to form a bigger picture in my head of what was happening in photography.

It was a few years after my return to the UK that I started to take it much more seriously, investing in a digital SLR and really taking note of what an aperture really was, how shutter speed affects things, and getting my head around ISO. I discovered that I really did love photography as much as I’d thought and I stepped it up a gear again, scouring the internet for all the information that was available and investing in all manner of books for my shelf.

The truth is, moving on from then to now, that I’m still learning and I’m positive that if you ask Scott whether he’s still learning, he’ll give you that same positive answer. And, Scott is someone who I’ve learned so much from with KelbyOne and his amazing books and from shooting together.

Me with Mimo Meidany, Roberto Pisconti, Juan Alfonso, and Scott Kelby, shooting together and learning from each other

The community of photographers incorporates all of us at every skill level, and it’s a great community. It’s one which we should treasure and respect because of its value to us all because, ultimately, wherever and however you learn about photography, you’re learning from a photographer.

Speaking of learning, Photoshop World West is right around the corner, and if you’re there I’d love to meet you!

Much love

Dave

#TravelTuesday with Dave sure comes around quick, doesn’t it! I’m back!

From time to time we may need to remind ourselves about why we work so hard at photography and don’t seem to get anywhere, be it for any number of reasons ranging from being stuck in a rut or for trying to achieve something time after time that fails. Like me, trying to get a shot of a lighthouse in front of a huge chalk cliff and failing several times in my efforts before finally getting the shot!

It took me three attempts to get that shot, and I even got capsized in my kayak in the process. But anyway, the point is this: –

  1. Make your big goals more manageable by breaking them into smaller tasks. 
  2. Remind yourself why you’re doing it.
  3. Remember the good feelings.
  4. Use your strengths.
  5. Decide to take action.

That’s it, that’s the list!

Okay, I’ll explain. If we have a big goal, it’s harder to achieve it. If we have a setback, it’s likely to put us off altogether if our goal is big. Whereas, if we break up our big goal into smaller, more manageable tasks we’re far more likely to succeed because those small tasks are accomplishments that together lead to achieving our big goal. If we fail at one of the small tasks, we’re far more likely to keep trying to overcome the problem because of number three—the good feelings.

The good feelings we get when we achieve something stick with us, but in moments where we feel that perhaps we aren’t hitting our targets or realising our goals, taking a moment to remind ourselves of the good feelings will help to spur us on even further. Taking that feeling and reminding ourselves why we’re doing something is valuable. That reminder as to why can often be enough to pick us up when we feel like we aren’t getting anywhere, and perhaps it’s that one occasion when we remind ourselves that we suddenly make progress where we weren’t before.

Pushing to number four (because this is obviously in order from the above list), we need to use our strengths, and in order for that to happen effectively, we need to recognise them—and our weaknesses! Knowing comprehensibly what our strengths are will help us to achieve goals, but knowing what our weaknesses are will help as well.

And, finally, take action! There are a lot of people out there doing nothing much aside from telling other people how they should be doing things. Don’t be that person—the person who says it can’t be done is usually interrupted by the person doing it.

So, if you have a shot in mind that’s particularly challenging, don’t give up on it! Persist, come up with a game plan, and keep trying. Pick yourself up when you fail, dust yourself off, and get it done.

The thing that motivated me to write this is the shot above. I was researching shots of Beachy Head Light in the UK and noticed they’re all very much alike. I wanted to be different. I knew the topography of the area was such that the enormous white, chalk cliff was essentially a hill, tapering off on either side of the lighthouse, and I wanted to feature that in my shot. I tried three times to get the shot, capsizing in a kayak and sliding all the way down the hill on my behind, but I didn’t let these things put me off and I got my shot.

Don’t give up. If something fails, try something else. And, then something else. Remind yourself why you did it, identify which of your strengths will help you, break down the task, remember the good feelings, and take action.

Much love

Dave

P.S. My Sunrise Challenge has just one week left – get your entries in for a chance to win big!

Hi, gang. I’m writing this from The Faroe Islands — a place that’s been on my travel wishlist for years now and I’m thrilled to be able to see and photograph this amazing place for a few days. Unlike Iceland (which is actually my next stop in just a couple of days), it’s not over-run by tourists or throngs of photographers (yet), and there’s something amazing around every corner. Absolutely beautiful islands.

I Skype’d into The Grid from onboard the ship I’m on traveling on this past week, and one of the questions was about my travel photography backup strategy, so I thought I’d go through it with you here today on the blog. It’s actually incredibly simple, but very effective.

BACKUP ONE: I don’t erase my memory cards the entire trip
That means bringing lots of cards, but SD cards (which is what my Canon EOS R uses) are dirt cheap right now. This two-pack of Lexar 64-Gig SD cards is just $18.99 at B&H Photo (link). When a card gets full, I just put it in my in-room safe until it’s time to return home.

BACKUP TWO: I Backup to a Hard Drive each night
Even if I’m really tired, at the end of the day each day I back-up all the new images on my card to a Samsung Portable SSD Drive. You can get the 500GB super-fast, super small, super lightweight drive for $89.95. I love this drive, and it’s with me all the time. (link)

BACKUP THREE: I send finals or picks to The Cloud
If I do any final images, or if I’ve made Picks of my best shots, I upload those to the cloud (either Dropbox or iCloud on my Mac) for safe-keeping. That way, if anything were to happen to my gear (it gets damaged or stolen), I still have my best shots backed up. I don’t back up all my shots — usually the upload speeds on hotel or a ship’s Internet are pretty bad, so I only upload the Picks or JPEG finals.

That’s it — three easy quick steps, and you’re triple-backed up. Hope you found that helpful.

Have a great week everybody — I’m off to jump in a boat to shoot some big rock formations off the coast!

-Scott

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