Category Archives Photography

I know a lot of high school and college teachers are already putting their curriculum together for the upcoming school year, which is why I wanted an opportunity to talk to those folks today on the blog. I have a lighting tool that I hope you’ll consider using in your classrooms.

It’s called “The Learning Light” it’s a lighting tool for educators (and students), and its sole purpose is to teach people lighting before they go out and actually buy real lighting. Check out the video below to see what it’s all about (and how the idea came about).

So, now that you’ve seen the video, you know — it’s about experimenting, learning, and seeing “the light.” That way, when your students do go out and buy a flash or a studio strobe or continuous light, the frustration, the futzing, and the whole guessing game is over because they’ll have a plan. They’ll have learned the fundamentals of lightings; and what they’re trying to achieve with lighting. They’ll learn what light does for portraits, when to use hard light, diffused light, what gobos do, what fresnels do, the color differences between tungsten and daylight.

The light comes with a full training class on light, and how to use The Learning Light, in your classroom as a tool for working with other students.

It’s got direct hard light, soft diffused light, a Fresnel spotlight, its own set of gobos, and a carrying case it all fits perfectly inside. It’s LED powered so it doesn’t get hot to the touch.

We’ve released a full training class on it for KelbyOne members, but if you buy the light, you also get full access to the class as part of the lighting package.

Here’s the kit:

The light, with the gobos and the training class, is just $89.90 and you can get it from the folks at FJ Westcott (here’s the link) who helped me bring The Learning Light to life.

This is not portrait lighting. It’s a learning tool.

One last thing, and it’s really important. This is not a substitute for portrait lighting. It’s a learning tool. It’s the light your students buy before they invest in real lighting. It’s for experimenting with shadows, and light, and for learning the fundamentals of lighting so when they do buy lighitng they’ll be a sucess.

As an educator myself, you can probably imagine how exciting it is to have created a tool like this for other educators and students, and I hope you find it helpful in your classroom this fall.

-Scott

P.S. We’ve added two more cities to my “Ultimate Photography Crash Course” full-day seminar tour. After Chicago and Detroit in mid-July, we added Boston and Philly in late August. Over 300 photographers are already signed up for the first two stops, and they’re still weeks away. If you want to come out and spend the day with me, here’s the link with all the details and tickets. Hope I get to meet you in one of these cities soon.

""

It’s #TravelTuesday with me, Dave Williams, and today I’m in the KelbyOne studios recording some classes for you beautiful people! If you’re waiting to learn a little more about how to make some money and about how to prepare for travel photography, you’ll love my two new classes! But before they land, I’d love all you KelbyOne members to join me in an exclusive webcast about where to shoot in Iceland, and if you aren’t a KelbyOne member you can sign up for a free.

Today, I want to touch on something else. Right now I’m planning on changing my camera, and it made me think a little about that age-old conundrum: whether or not gear makes the photographer. Well, my answer is no, and my argument is that if you give a pro photographer a $700 camera, and give a rookie a $5,000 camera, the pro will produce the better image. One main reason for this argument is that the pro will be concentrating on the creativity whereas the rookie is more likely to be focused on the gear. Here’s why: –

When a pro photographer and a rookie photographer each shoot 100 images, the pro is more likely to say that one is good, and the rookie is more likely to say that 90 are good. If they then look at each other’s images, the pro is likely to say that one of the rookie’s is good, and the rookie is likely to say that 90 of the pro’s are good. Self-criticism lands front and centre, and the pro is far more critical of themselves than others. But it goes beyond that: –

When the pro screws up, they are far more likely to blame themselves than to blame the gear. They are probably shooting Manual, may have added some extra gear, such as filters or lighting, and have planned the shot. If something goes wrong, they are far more likely to blame the application of their knowledge than they are to blame the gear. Here’s the point: they will use the same gear and try again until they get it right, working on correcting their technique rather than switching out the gear.

There’s a lesson to be taken from this. Being honest about your skills, having the understanding to apply them, and giving objective evaluation to your creative vision will help you to become a better photographer and not to rely on the gear, rather to rely on yourself. I’ve been through this process and continue to do so, as does every other pro photographer, and it’s extremely valuable to think this way.

I hope to catch you all in the comments tomorrow on The Grid!

Much love

Dave

OK, it may be more than a few, but it includes lots of behind-the-scenes shots (often including camera settings), and shots from my travel workshop there, and from my trip to Provence to shoot the Lavender fields, and the story behind it all.

If you’ve got a minute and want to start off your Monday in a “French crepe with Bananas and Nutella” kinda way, I hope you’ll give it a quick look. Here’s the link:

https://spark.adobe.com/page/iu1Zv6auT0fu5/

Thanks, everybody, and here’s wishing you bakery baguette kind of morning.

Merci,

-Scott

I was hoping to share the shots and stories from my Paris trip today, but with catching up at work and all, I couldn’t get it done in time, but I did want to share something I’m particularly excited about. Remember that trip I took out to the aircraft carrier, the USS Harry S. Truman (link)? The images and story from that trip are featured in a 12-page article in the June issue of the International Society of Aviation Photography’s (ISAP) official magazine (ISnAP), and I am psyched!

Here’s a look at the spreads from the page.

If you want to see more images from the trip (or at least larger ones than shown here), you can check out Adobe Spark page on the trip.

Many thanks to ISnAP for including me in their awesome magazine. Very honored indeed.

Have a great weekend everybody!

-Scott

P.S. Chicago area photographers — I’m heading up there next month with my new full-day seminar, “The Ultimate Photography Crash Course.” Details and tickets right here.

Hi all! It’s #TravelTuesday here on Scott Kelby’s blog and that means I’m here to lay down something from the world of Photoshop, photography, travel, and life. Today is no exception! I’m Dave Williams—let me tell you a sad story.

There’s a shot I want to get so bad. It’s here in the UK and it’s dangerous! I want to get out on the water of the English Channel to shoot the Beachy Head Lighthouse from the sea. The problem, however, is that where there’s a lighthouse, there tends to be a reason! The lighthouse is accessible from land about 1.5 miles west or 2 miles east because of the high cliffs behind it. The only way is to launch from one of these two points and going via the water.

The shot will look amazing. I want to get a wide shot with the stereotypical red and white lighthouse centre-frame and have the enormous white cliffs taper off in either direction, and I want it at sunrise. I’ve tried to get this shot three times and failed. Here’s what happened: –

The first time I had an inflatable kayak. I drove through the night (it’s a 170-miles round trip) to arrive in time for sunrise. I was there on time and the twilight gave me the blue hour, so I hauled my gear—the kayak, life vest, paddle, waterproof bag with camera and drone—down a dead-steep hill to the cliffs and then down the cracks and ledges in the limestone, and was at the water’s edge about 15 minutes before dawn. The water was rough and I walked along the tide line trying to find a safe spot. The water was just too rough, though, for an inflatable kayak and there was no safe place to launch, so I had to turn myself back around and carry everything back up that insanely steep hill, back to the car, and try again another day. My legs were burning from lactic acid with all that weight on such a steep hill, and it was all for nothing.

The next time I quit halfway there, the weather report changed and it wasn’t even worth going. That’s two goes, and a couple of days ago was attempt number three. I left home before 1:00 a.m. to make it down to the coast. First light was forecast at 4:00 a.m. and sunrise at 4:46, so I had to get there with plenty of time to get in position. The first challenge I had was, with this attempt being at the other location, I needed to carry the rigid kayak I’d got down the stairs to the stone beach I’d launch from. It wasn’t light!

The next challenge was the launch. All the planning I’d put in by checking weather, wind, tides etc., was telling me there’d be a high neap tide with low wind, which tends to suggest the waves will be minimal. What I actually faced was something altogether different: –

The waves were enormous, but I pushed on. First, I put the kayak at the water’s edge and climbed in with my waterproof bag between my legs. But, before I could get the spray deck attached, the water swept over me and flooded me out. Unperturbed by this setback (as is my nature), I pulled the kayak back, turned it over to empty it out, and tried again. The second launch wasn’t all that much better though, turning me sideways and showing me the sheer power of the water. I was done in again by the sea and gathered everything back together to try again. Third time’s a charm, right? Unfortunately not. This time I’d managed to get settled and get the spray deck attached in time for the first big wave to come in and hit me, but the power of the sea was still just too much and I was fully inverted. I had to give up.

When I said this shot was dangerous, I meant life-threateningly so. I was cold and drenched through every layer—the sea had beaten me and I still don’t have the shot! Shame too because the sunrise was pretty cool that day.

But here’s the thing: if you have a target in your sights, don’t give up on it. I’ll be back to get that shot! (By the way, if anybody reading this has a boat in Eastbourne, please feel free to get in touch!) I’m not giving up on this shot—I’ll get it one way or another. It’s not worth giving up on something good just because it’s a bit difficult.

Don’t give up just because things are hard. I have a tattoo on my left arm which says “aut viam inveniam aut faciam” which is Latin and means either find a way or make one. If you can’t stop thinking about it, don’t stop working for it, because some things that are worth having don’t come easy. You are so much stronger than you think. Someday you’ll look back on all the progress you made and be glad you didn’t quit. If you fall three times, stand up four, because winners aren’t people who don’t fail—they’re people who don’t quit.

Much love

Dave

I’m happy to announce that we are now accepting entries to have your own solo gallery showing at The Gallery at KelbyOne, in Tampa, Florida.

Our past winners have included an engineer on the long island Railroad, an Anesthesiologist, one worked for the police department. Our next winner could be you. If you’re thinking there’s no way you could win, that’s exactly what the previous winners said. The only way you don’t have a chance is if you don’t enter.

Here’s a quick one-minute video with some details:

Here’s how to enter: 

  1. Here’s where you submit a link to your portfolio, or Facebook album, or Flickr page, or online gallery – (we’re looking for a body of work – around 20 images) Note: this competition is only open to KelbyOne Pro members.
  2. From the submissions, we will choose a single winner. It could be you. If it is, we’ll fly you and a guest (from anywhere in the world) to the gallery in Tampa, Florida for a solo gallery showcasing your work, where we’ll feature approximately 18 of your images, beautifully printed and displayed by Bay Photo Lab using their amazing Xpozer system.
  3. The evening of the opening, you will welcome the crowd to a wine and cheese reception held in your honor that evening in the gallery where they can see your work, and get a chance to chat with you in person.
  4. Following the reception, we’ll move to our theater for an interview with you about your work, your life, your inspirations, and well…you. It will be streamed live around the world (along with behind-the-scenes images of the opening, and photos of your work).
  5. When it’s all over, you will receive all the prints from the exhibition (courtesy of Bay Photo Lab), and one of your images will be added our permanent collection, so future visitors can get see one of your winning gallery images.
  6. The deadline for submissions is: May 29, 2019, at 11:59 PM EDT.

Have questions?
Here’s the link to an earlier post with a detailed Q&A on how this all works.

One more thing…
We’ll wrap up with some photos from earlier gallery contest winner’s gallery openings:

Hope we’ll be welcoming you to your own gallery show very soon. Good luck everybody!

Have a great weekend!

-Scott

P.S. Next Thursday the East Coast Photoshop World conference kicks off in Orlando. Want to go? It’s not too late. photoshopworld.com

Close