Category Archives Photoshop

[A note from Scott: I’m excited to introduce you to my friend and colleague Dave William, who’ll be writing a column here on Tuesdays on the blog. Please give him a warm welcome and make him feel at home here with the crew. So glad to have him join our ranks. – SK]

I’m Dave Williams, a photographer from London, England, and I specialize (note the American spelling) in travel photography. I appreciate that saying ‘travel photography’ is extremely broad, but that’s what I love about it! I can go out and shoot nature, wildlife, people, landscapes, cityscapes, it all fits the category and it pushes me to challenge myself from time to time and allows me to get out and see the world.

I go by the stage name of Hybrid Dave, let me introduce myself. I am one-half of Hybrid Photography, an Instagram influencer, a Getty Images contributor and ambassador, a Lonely Planet contributor and a member of various professional organizations. You can find me on social media by searching for Hybrid Dave.

Apparently I was the subject of a meeting in the KelbyOne offices when there was a space to fill here on the website, and I’m so happy that I was asked to fill that space because throughout my journey so far in photography from the age of 14 when my dad got me the Nikon SLR for my birthday that I so desperately wanted (I’m now 32) I’ve sought inspiration, guidance and education from far and wide By far the best source for me has been Scott and his books, and the awesome team of educators at KelbyOne.

You may have seen my tutorials online before or in KelbyOne’s Photoshop User Magazine, and you may even have inadvertently seen my work in any number of places including Lonely Planet, National Geographic, Time, or even on billboards or in newspapers. From now on you’ll also see me right here every Tuesday on ScottKelby.com blogging for you all from across the pond! I’ll be sharing my favourite tips and tricks, some insider secrets, and perhaps a little bit of my own personal opinion on photography and Adobe Photoshop. Every week I’ll show you how I push the limits of what I have available to reach maximum potential in the highly competitive photography industry, how I make the most from it all in travel and wedding photography, and how to grow. I’ll provoke you with my thoughts and share skills with you wherever I can.

 

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In today’s post, I’ll kick things off for you with a mini tutorial combining Adobe Photoshop with Instagram and show you how I make the most of Instagram’s new ‘multiple photo’ feature to showcase panoramic photos in a way that was never before possible on this social media platform.

Here’s a link to the shot on my profile if you want to explore how it feels, and here’s how to do it….

First off, we need to select the right image to make this work best for us. A good panoramic image for this technique is one which results in featuring a point of interest within each of the frames so that on each swipe the viewer has something engaging them to keep going. I’m going to use a shot of an awesome classic car dash which I found whilst wandering an artsy, bohemian district of L.A. with Peter Treadway and Stephanie Richer whilst we had a bit of downtime from shooting a wedding in the Agoura Hills.

 

start

 

We start by considering the math of the panorama. In a multiple shot post on Instagram you have to use the square format, so we need to break the image into perfect, equally divided squares. The width of each crop, therefore, must equal the height of the overall panorama, therefore the overall length must be a multiple of this height in order to seamlessly blend when the viewer swipes through. Keeping up?

We’ll take our shot and crop it to this criteria, which in this case is 7200 pixels wide by 2400 pixels high, resulting in three equal squares. Because the detail of the dash, which is what we want to feature in this shot, is in the top left portion of the photo we select the top left as the anchor point in the ‘crop’ dialog box once we’ve input the size of the crop, before clicking OK.

 

step1

 

The result is this, which we now need to break into three.

 

step2

To do this we’ll use the Crop Tool again. Select the Crop Tool but this time set the width to the same as the height, which is 2400 pixels in this case, and set the anchor point to the left.

 

step3

The result is a square crop of the left of the panorama, which we can save under a relevant name. Once saved, simply go back by hitting CMD+Z (Windows: CTRL+Z) to step back to the whole panorama.

 

step4

We need to repeat what we’ve done but select the middle square, so with everything as it was before except for the anchor point now being in the center, crop the image again.

 

step5

And finally, to get the right-hand square, we crop the panorama one last time but with the anchor point set to the right.

 

step7

Now we have three square images which we can send over to our phone and upload to Instagram. We need to use the ‘Multiple photos’ icon and select the three photos from our gallery in order from the left square as number one to the right square as number three.

Now it’s complete and our viewers on Instagram will be able to swipe seamlessly through a panorama in a way never before possible on Instagram, giving us an edge over the competition with a cool trick that’s only just beginning to be used. I haven’t seen this used more than a handful of times, but since I posted and began to write this little tutorial I’ve noticed that @NatGeoTravel have posted a beautiful panorama from Italy, so get in there while it’s still hot!

Much love,

Dave

Hi, gang, and happy Monday! I’ve been sailing the seven seas (not really), and I’ve dug up (not really) some more Photoshop Buried Treasure (OK, this part is true), and this time it’s on how to get back to the previous version of Select and Mask, which used to be called “Refine Edge.”

Adobe updated Refine Edge with a new mathematical algorithm and a totally new workspace (rather than it just being a floating panel), and while the new math works better for some images, it doesn’t work as well for some other, so being able to jump back to the other method (and old math) when you need to is pretty handy. Here’s a quick rundown:

Above: Here’s the current Select & Mask workspace, with its own toolbar on the left side, and side panel on the right, using the new math. I really love this new interface, and how it works most of the time, but there are certain instances where the old version works better, and that’s why Adobe added a way for us to get back to the older version.

STEP ONE: To access the old Refine Edge feature, hold the Shift-key, then go under the Select menu up top, and choose Select and Mask from the menu (as shown here — it doesn’t work if you hold Shift and click the Select and Mask button in the Options Bar — you have to choose it from the pop-down menu as shown here).

STEP TWO: Now the regular Photoshop interface remains in place, and the old Refine Edge window appears, as seen above, and you can use it like you always used (provided, of course, that you always used to). :)

Hope you found that little piece of Photoshop Buried Treasure helpful! :)

Don’t forget — Friday at 8:00 pm — LIVE from the “Gallery at KelbyOne”…
It’s an interview and behind-the-scenes from KelbyOne member’s solo gallery show in the Gallery at KelbyOne. Join the most awesome Larry Becker, as he sits down with competition winner Melanie Kern-Favila to talk about her amazing photography, and get to know her and work. It’s free; everyone’s invited to join us, and it will be simulcast on my Facebook, this Friday, July 21st. Ask anyone who attended the first opening with Mark Wegner, it’s really a fun, inspiring night, and a great opportunity to join us in celebrating the wonderful work of our members.

When: Friday, July 21st, 8:00 PM, EDT
Where: My Facebook page live

See you then! Have a great Monday, ya’ll!

-Scott

P.S. If you’re a KelbyOne member and you’d like to join us in person at the Gallery this Friday at 7 pm for a wine and cheese reception for Melanie’s Gallery Opening, you are welcome to join us and enjoy her work in person (it’s free for KelbyOne members, but there’s limited seating, so grab your seats now – here’s the link).

Hi gang, and happy Monday (groan). Aw come on, it’s going to be a great week (especially since I’m on vacation out in Vegas. Whoo hoo!).

Anyway, here’s another installment in my on-going series of Photoshop Buried Treasure — this time it’s about a filter in Photoshop CC that’s been there for a while, but it’s hidden deep within Photoshop’s dense forest of filters (sorry, couldn’t help myself). Anyway, it’s a filter that makes trees. I am not making this up (see above where I added that tree. Not the treasure map. Up at the very top). Check it this filter out below, mateys:

Hope you found that helpful. :)

Hey, Richmond and Nashville, some Lightroom training is coming your way…
…as I’m coming there for my full-day seminar later this month. Here’s a link with all the details. Come on out and spend the day with me. Just $89 if you book your ticket now. Includes LOTS of goodies (like presets and stuff). See you there!

Have a good one everybody, and plant a tree today (even if it’s a digital one). ;-)

Best,

-Scott

Hi Gang: Friday I did a post on “How to Shoot Awesome Fireworks shots!”  and today it’s how to Edit them in Photoshop (that way you’re prepared for the editing, now, too!). The video includes a really simple trick for creating your own custom “Fireworks Show Finale!” So cool you’ll drop your hot dog. That sounds bad but you know what I mean. 

Check out the video I made for you below:

Pretty fun stuff. Hope you get some awesome shots!.

Our offices are closed tomorrow for the Holiday…but…
We’ll be back on Wednesday for another gripping episode of “The Grid” and you don’t want to miss it because…well…you just don’t want to miss it. Ya know. Missing it is bad. Etc.

Have a great Monday, and be safe tomorrow and get back here Wednesday in one piece.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Are you coming out to my full-day Lightroom seminar in Nashville or Richmond this month? Ya oughta. It’s a pretty fun day, and you’ll learn a bunch, and you’ll have the opportunity to buy a really expensive bland convention center lunch. Here’s the link with details. 

Wouldn’t it be cool if you could take a folder of images (RAW images, TIFF images, etc.) and have Photoshop automatically convert that folder of images into any formats you like (PSDs, TIFFs, JPEGS or all three at the same time), and while it’s doing it, how about having it run the Photoshop Action of your choice, and even embed a color profile for the Web, and your copyright info? That would be cool, right?

Here’s how to unleash this unholy power! (it’s not really unholy — that was just added for dramatic effect because, after all, this is just a script running in the background doing fancy stuff you can’t see).

See, that was cooler than it sounded, right?

OK, guess where I’m going? 
If you guessed either:

Nashville (Friday, July 28th)
> Richmond (Wednesday, July 26th)
> Los Angeles (Monday, August 14th)
> Seattle (Friday, August 18th)
> San Francisco (Wednesday, August 16th)

You were right on the money!

I’ll be in those cities teaching my Lightroom On Tour full day seminar, and I want you to come out. How much do I want you to come out? Well, enough that I made a 1-minute, 8-second video to tell you all the cool stuff you will learn (and it’s plenty!). Here’s the link with all the details (but watch that video first).

OK, makes you want to come and join me right? Right! Let’s do this! :)  Hope I’ll get to meet you in person in one of those cities.

Have a kick-butt Tuesday! (if there is such a thing). ;-)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Tomorrow is “Blind Photo Critique” day on The Grid. Our category is “Portraits” and we’ll have Hungarian retoucher Viktor Fejes as my in-studio guest (here’s here recording some classes for KelbyOne – he is awesome!). Here’s the link to submit your portrait images. 

Dear Adobe: 
It’s 2017, and we still have to hold the Shift-key to resize things proportionally. Can we please, please just resize images like nearly every modern application on the planet does, where the default is to resize proportionally by just dragging, but then if you want to squash or stretch the image non-proportionally, then you hold the Shift key?

I know, this is “the way we’ve always done it…” but it’s not too late to change this for us, and for future generations of Photoshop users (especially people new to the program, who are used to resizing images without having to hold a modifier key).

If you’re concerned about those people who hate change, how about a compromise — make it an option in Photoshop’s Preferences. Give us a checkbox in the General Preferences that says “Resize with Shift, ” and it can even be on by default, but at least we could turn it off and resize images proportionally without having to hold a stinkin’ modifier key.

Imagined History Lesson
A buddy of mine and I were talking about this very topic a while back, and he said he imagined what happened was this:

Somewhere around Photoshop 3.0 (when Layers were introduced), an Adobe Product Manager said to the engineers, “We need a way to resize an image on a Layer,” and they said, “OK, here ya go, it’s called ‘Free Transform.’ The product managers started testing it and said, “Hey, it doesn’t resize proportionally — it stretches everything!” so the engineers went back, added that feature, and said “OK, we added it. Just hold the Shift key and now you can resize proportionally.”

Now, we have no idea if that’s how it all came down, but it sure sounds plausible to me.

There’s Still Time…
For the past few years, at Adobe’s Max Conference (coming up in October) they have announced/released new features for Photoshop CC, and since it’s only June, there’s probably time to add a preference for turning off the Shift-key thing. So, my plea to Adobe (on behalf of Photoshop users everywhere) is:

Please either swap the Shift key thing (make it only necessary when you don’t want to resize proportionally) or give us an option in preferences to change it ourselves. 

Now, what I would say to Adobe is this:

“I know you don’t want to change this (because if you did, you already would have), but if you had to start over from scratch and rebuild Photoshop all over today, would you still make proportional resizing require holding the Shift key? Of course not. You know how I know this is true? Because recently you did build a new application from the ground up — Adobe Muse — and when you resize images in Muse, they resize proportionally without holding the Shift key.”

Adobe, this simple change would make you heroes to many, many longtime Photoshop users out there. Remember when you let us change the name of a Layer by just double-clicking on it? It used to take a pop-up dialog box, but then you fixed it, and we cheered. Little things like this mean a lot to people who live and work in Photoshop CC every day. We’re not asking for some miracle technology. We’re not asking for the next healing brush or Vanishing Point. It’s “the little things.” Just add a simple preference to make our lives easier. It’s hero time.

Drops the mic. ;-)

Hope you all have a great Monday, with minds open to change and not just doing things because “that’s the way we always did them.”

Best,

-Scott

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