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Happy Friday, everybody! I wasn’t quite sure what I was going to write about today, until I saw this tweet yesterday, and then I knew I had to do a short video (below), which is part studio technique and part retouching in Photoshop (the Photoshop part is really simple. Heck, the studio technique is really simple. It’s all simple — you just have to remember to do it during the shoot or you may not have much of a prayer afterward.

Hope you found that helpful.

Hey, are you coming to see me next week in San Diego?
I hope you are – I’m there teaching my new seminar. Come out and spend the day with me. :)

Have a great weekend,

-Scott

P.S. Want to watch something really fascinating and fun this weekend? Check out Moose Peterson’s brand new course on post processing for landscape photographers in Camera Raw. Here’s the link. 

About The Author

Scott is a Photographer, bestselling Author, Host of "The Grid" weekly photography show; Editor of Photoshop User magazine; Lightroom Guy; KelbyOne.com CEO; struggling guitarist. Loves Classic Rock and his arch-enemy is Cilantro. Devoted husband, dad to two super awesome kids, and pro-level babysitter to two crazy doggos.

22 Comments

  1. Thanks Scott, that was very good quick tip

  2. Neat tip! If I ever can’t nix the reflections in a situation while shooting for whatever reason, I’ll remember to grab a frame w/o the specs. Thanks!

  3. Nice tip, but I’m not completely convinced for every situation. Sometimes the glasses changes the shape of eyes and they wouldn’t look realistic.

  4. Very nice tutorial and effective indeed if you have a photo that is already shot, however if the photographer is planning ahead then I think the real right way of doing it is to choose a light setup that does not reflect light in the lens, if a specific light setup is a must and reflections are not avoidable, then a polarizer on the flash and another one on the lens are sufficient to elemenate all reflections in one shot and with no post processing, that saves time if you are shooting more than one shot.
    Regards.

    • In theory it would work, but if you actually try it, it doesn’t. The Polarizer won’t cut nearly enough of the reflections.

      • Abdallah Mohamed Kroosh

        Not to mention the first option which is correct light setup, polarizer technique is an old trick from the days of film not just a theory, keep in mind we are talking about two polarizes, one on the flash and one on the lens so in theory it should eliminate all reflections but I have to mention that it has some other drawbacks which you may read about it with examples in the famous book named (light: science and magic) chapter 3 is for mangment of reflection and family of angles.
        Maybe we should have a video about that.

  5. Very cool, thanks Scott!

  6. Does every tip have to be a video? Let me answer, no…In your book it works just fine without audio…I use a RSS reader and in down moments, on aircraft, in my backyard…don’t always have connectivity, don’t always WANT to be connected…so I guess I don’t get the tip….

    One more comment: Maybe I am different than many but in the time I have been a NAPP member or Kelbyone (since 2010) I have viewed less than 10 videos on your site…if they load cleanly (not a given), you gotta keep pausing to zoom in to see the “white on black” UI in PS or LR that you insist on using- despite its worse readability…flip through your books even….check out which screen captures are most readable…always the white on black (gee…like books publish- text reads best if white on black)

    Just sayin”…

  7. I miss you doing full classes in Ps on KelbyOne.

    It’s the real reason I joined NAPP in the first place. If I could have a say…. or a wish, it would be that you’ll do more of these FULL episodes. Try and beat the class where you’re in Pairs shooting… then in the cafe editing. One of the best classes on Kelby — bar none.

  8. Thanks! You make it look so easy!.

  9. Cool tip. Would also be nice if Blend-If was used and brought back some of the shadows from the top and sides of the frame so that it doesn’t look like it’s just pasted on. Works better than reducing the opacity as you can avoid bringing the highlights back if not needed. #my2cents ;)

  10. Excellent tip. Don’t do much portraiture but it makes me think. Could it work else ware? Just started photography. Bought one of your books. It’s like you are right there with me. Got rid of the other two books. Yours covered all.

  11. […] post How to Remove Glare in Eyeglasses in Photoshop appeared first on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop […]

  12. […] post How to Remove Glare in Eyeglasses in Photoshop appeared first on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop […]

  13. This is a great tip, thank you! You know another related tip that would be super helpful? One that deals with the “gap” on the sides of the face when a person is wearing glasses and their head is not directly in front of the camera. It has to do with lens refraction (or something like that) but a tricky one to fix.

  14. […] photo shoot in my home studio. Eye glasses had a strong reflection so I used a technique from Scott Kelby which is basically just taking an another photo without glasses and using eyes from […]

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