Posts By Scott Kelby

Hi Gang: We’re just a month and a half away from the biggest Photoshop event on the planet: The Photoshop World Conference and Expo (in Orlando on April 17-19 at the Orange County Convention Center), and if you’re going (and I hope that you are), here are the sessions I’m teaching (there are over 100+ sessions but I hope you’ll check out a couple of mine while you’re at the conference).

Designing With Type for Photographers
Bad type can ruin a really great photo and in this session, I’m going to show you how to create photo book covers, posters, web graphics and more  and how to have your type really compliment your work, rather than destroy it. You’ll learn everything from the basics of typography including which fonts to use, when, and why, and how to create simple, beautiful-looking designs (it’s easier than you’d think). This class will change the way think about, and use type and photos together from this point on.

Creating Your Own Custom Photo Book in Lightroom 4
In this session you’ll learn how to create beautiful photo books from right within Lightroom 4 itself. You’ll see the entire workflow, step-by-step and exactly how to create your own custom books the easy way. There are lots of little inside tips, tricks, and time-saving techniques that you’ll learn that will make creating photo books one of the most-fun, easy, and enjoyable parts of your photographic journey.

Tips and Tricks for Shooting Sports
I’ll be covering everything from the gear you need, to camera settings, accessories, remote cameras, techniques, strategies and the whole ball of wax to get you shooting sports like a pro! I’ve put together some of my favorite tips, the latest tricks I’ve learned, and how to get the type of sports photos you’ve always dreamed of. If you’re into shooting sports (or think you might want to), I think you’ll really get a lot out of this session.

Portrait Retouching Techniques for Photographers
Learn professional portrait retouching techniques for photographers from the guy who literally wrote the book (hey, that’s me!). You’ll learn my latest portrait retouching techniques and the fastest, most efficient, and most realistic-looking retouches for anyone who shoots portraits, and need to spend less time behind the computer and more time making images.

If you’re going, I hope to see you in one of my classes. If you haven’t signed up yet, it’s not too late: Here’s the link.

Also, we’ve designed this year’s event to have Seven very distinct FULL training tracks, so you can pretty much pick what you want to learn and get immersed in that topic for the entire conference, every day, all day long if you like (for example, if you’re into Lightroom, you can take Lightroom classes every day all day — it’s like its own separate Lightroom conference within a conference. Same thing with Lighting, or graphic design, or business, and so on).

I put together a short video (below) that describes this “Seven Conferences in One” concept. Hope to see you in Orlando in April.


… a “Do That Last Step Again” keyboard shortcut.

Here’s why this would rock: How many times have you had to do something like resize three photos to a particular size, and since you’re only resizing three of them this one time, it doesn’t make sense to go write an Action for them because by the time you actually wrote the action, you could have already been done with the resizing manually. Short, repetitive stuff like that happens all the time during our work, and the only way to do them is just to sit there and down them — one at a time.

Worse yet, what if it’s two steps to four photos? Like resize to 610 pixels wide and apply an Unsharp Mask. Ugh!

So imagine if you could resize a photo, and then just press a keyboard shortcut to apply that exact same resize to the next photo? Or if you could add a Modifier key (like the Alt key) and now it applies your last two steps? (Resize and Unsharp Mask) Add another modifier (like Shift) and it applies your last THREE steps! (Resize, Unsharp Mask and Crop!). All three moves â” just one shortcut. Sweet!

Imagine how that would boost your productivity day in and day out (but of course, like any Photoshop feature, some folks would never use it at all). Anyway, that’s the one simple feature I would love to see added to the next version of Photoshop (I’ve been wanting this one for years!).

OK, I shared my one pet Photoshop  feature request. I know you’ve got one, too, so let’s hear it.  (remember, you only get one). :-)

P.S. Thanks to Rich Harrigton and Scott Bourne who spurred this discussion when I was their guest on their Photofocus Podcast last week. If you missed it, here’s the link.

Hi gang: I thought I’d do a quick video (above) for you all here on the blog that takes you through the step-by-step process of setting up a wireless remote camera — ideal for sports, for weddings, or anywhere where you can’t get a camera, or can’t be at two places at once.

If you have any questions that I didn’t cover in the short video above, just post ’em here and I’ll do my best to answer them, once I’m awake and have a cup of coffee or three. Cheers, and hope you have a great kick-off to your week.

— Scott

You’ve got to watch the video above — it explains the whole thing, but I’ve got to tell you — we are incredibly excited about this. We put a lot of work into making something really unique and really special, but  it’s only for 20 very cool, very lucky photographers, and I hope you’re one of them. I hope you can join me (and Scott — watch the video) for one of the coolest workshops ever! I am not kidding! :)

Here’s the link to sign up -

P.S. Scott and I will be answering your questions here on the blog, but give me a chance to wake up and at least have a cup of coffee or two! ;-)  This is going to be (wait for it….wait for it….) edit. No, epic! 

The new issue of “Light It” magazine is here!
We publish a magazine for the iPad for people into hot shoe flash and/or studio lighting and the latest issue is now available for download from the App Store (that’s the cover above, with a cover shot by yours truly — it’s from my regular column called “Lighting Recipes” where I show the final image, and then the behind-the-scenes images, camera set-up, lighting set-up and the whole ball of wax so you can not only see how it’s done, you can do it yourself. Lots of awesome stuff in this issue, so I hope you’ll check it out.

Stay with me at the Rosen Centre Hotel
If you’re joining us in Orlando in April for the Photoshop World Conference & Expo, stay where me and all the instructors are staying â” the Rosen Centre Hotel (a very nice hotel right directly across the street from the convention center). They’ve got a special room rate just for our convention attendees ((rooms are only $159 per night + tax if you grab one now), but when those rooms are gone… they’re gone… so if you want to stay with me at the Rosen, here’s the link with the discount codes and all that stuff.

“5 Incredible Online Communities to Get Genuine Feedback on Your Photography” list
A big shout-out to the LightStalking blog (and Tiffany Mueller) for giving our free weekly show for photographers “The Grid” some love about our monthly “Blind Photo Critiques” episodes by including us in their list of ““5 Incredible Online Communities to Get Genuine Feedback on Your Photography.” By the way, we had a great episode this past week with Wedding photographer Cliff Mautner as our in-studio guest. If you’ve got a sec —  here’s the link to LightStalking’s full list of 5 incredible online communities for genuine feedback. (our humble thanks to for including us. We were pretty psyched when we saw our name on that list!).

Lastly, check out our “Seven Conferences in One” concept for this year’s Photoshop World (above).
It’s an exciting new concept for us, and people are totally digging it (the short video above explains it). I don’t want to spoil it, so just watch the really short video where I explain it.

Oh yeah, more one thing
I have a cool announcement set for Thursday here on the blog that I hope will only marginally interrupt our regularly scheduled “Free Stuff Thursday.” We’re doing something I haven’t seen anyone do  —-  ever (I gotta tell ya — it’s not for everybody, but the people that go “Oh man — that is for me!” are going to lose their minds!) so make sure you mark on your calendars to check back with me here on Thursday. PRE-EMPTIVE STRIKE: Ken Toney, don’t send me a private email asking me to tell you what the secret is — it’s “too secret” even for you! LOL!

Have a great Tuesday and we’ll see you back here tomorrow when a sports photography legend takes over for Guest Blog Wednesday. Cheers! -Scott 


Last week when I posted my detail shots of exotic cars from the duPont Registery’s in-house collection, a buddy of mine Karl-Franz Marquez dropped me a line about it, and included some shots he had taken of his own car, a beautiful Aston Martin Vantage that he also shot “Tim Wallace” style (after watching some of Tim’s online classes at

He had some taken some beautiful shots, and I was totally digging on his car, and Karl-Franz offered to drive over for the day (around 150 miles each way) to let me shoot this British made Aston Martin, and so yesterday we did an afternoon shoot, indoors at our headquarters inside our video studios.

Above: Here’s the behind-the-scenes shot of the image at the top of the page. That’s Karl-Franz holding a second flash to light the grill in the front of the bar (it’s half the size and power of the large soft box lighting the wheel and edge of the hood above). So, it’s two strobes total powered by the Elinchrom Quadra Ranger powerpack hanging from the light stand in front of me. Camera settings: ISO 100, Aperture f/22, Shutter Speed 1/200 of a second. Full power on the strobe. 

NOTE: The screen screen area behind the car is just there by coincidence — we rolled the car into that part of our video studio so we’d have room to shoot it —  it had nothing to do with our photo shoot (other than spilling green on the other side of the car so we could only shoot on one side).

Above: here’s a detail shot of the engine. I went back and watched Tim’s class and he had a segment on shooting engines so I just followed his instruction to get this shot. 

Above: here’s the behind-the-scenes shot of the engine shot you just saw. Just one light with a long strip-bank positioned opposite me. I’m shooting with a Macro zoom lens. 

Above: After watching Tim’s videos on shooting car details, there was something I missed the right time around, and it’s that he angles the wheels about 20° and it definitely does make a difference. 

Above: here’s the behind-the-scenes of the wheel shot. Not particularly glamorous — a lot of laying on the floor or shooting on your knees (fun on concrete). Just one light for this one. Same settings — shooting at f/22 (or up to f/32 in some cases) makes the light fall of fast to black. 

Here’s a few more shots from the day.

Above: Those three above are just using that one soft box with the long stripbank. All the settings are pretty much the same — f/22 to f/32 so the edges fall off quickly to solid black. I tried to fix a few mistakes I made during the duPont shoot. Luckily, Tim gave me some tips after I sent him some I was struggling with. Mostly, I think I wasn’t getting the softbox in close enough, and I wasn’t powering it high enough, and of course both of Tim’s comments were super helpful. 

Above: I don’t actually like this shot — it didn’t come out quite like I had hoped (I like my rear shot of the Ferrari last week much better lightning wise), but I’m showing it because I did pick up a great tip from Karl-Franz — and that is — he has a black license plate that he uses when shooting cars (seen here). It’s actually the flip-side of the dealer’s license plate that came with the car — how handy is that! :-)

Anyway, I liked the idea so much I ordered a blank, black custom license plate last night from (it was probably not the cheapest way of coming up with an all black license plate, but I was short on time). Anyway, hats off to Karl-Franz for the idea.

Above: Here’s our crew: that’s Karl-Franz’s girlfriend  wife Honey (her real given name); me in the center, and Karl-Franz (fake German guy who owns amazing sports cars and yet is a friend of Vanelli) on the right. 

Above: Seeing as we’re: (a) Shooting a car made in the UK, and (b) using techniques we learned from UK-based commercial automative photographer Tim Wallace, I thought I’d (c) wear my Marshall Amplification Union Jack shirt (legendary guitar amps made in the UK) to create a British “triple threat.” 

A big thinks to Karl-Franz for driving all the way over to our offices to let me shoot one of his cool cars; to Honey for being incredibly patient during the three-hour shoot; to Brad Moore for all his help and suggestions, and of course to the amazing Tim Wallace for helping Me, Karl-Franz, and thousands of other photographers by sharing his awesome automative lighting and shooting techniques.

P.S.  Good news — Tim will be back here in the States filming more classes for Kelby Training very soon (I haven’t seen the full slate of what he’s teaching, but I know I’ll be begging him to do one on lighting car interiors). :)