Category Archives Lighting

On Friday I did a series of promo shots for Performance Compound, a training facility where a lot of pro athletes train, everyone from NFL players to Major League Baseball, and did about 14 portraits that day assisted by Brad Moore and crew (that’s Third Baseman Sean Buckley above) and I thought I’d share a couple of finals here, along with the behind-the-scenes photos and the post-processed and unprocessed images.

This entire process is the same as what I showed on my Light it, Shoot it, Retouch it tour, with the addition of one extra back light on the subject (as you’ll see in a moment). Here goes:

1. Above: here’s the shot as it came out of the camera. I used a Grid on the beauty dish above his head to get a quick fall-off on the light. My main concern here is the side lighting from the back, and that part looks good. His face is supposed to be darker.

2. Above: Here’s the shot with some simple, quick adjustments in Lightroom’s Basic Panel (if you don’t have Lightroom, it would be exactly the same settings in Photoshop’s Camera Raw). The settings are below.

3. Above: I wasn’t kidding about simple adjustments: Just increased the Whites a bit, plus lots of Clarity and I lowered the Vibrance a bit to desaturate his skin. I also took the Adjustment Brush, increased the Exposure slider a little bit (dragging to the right) and painted over his face to brighten it (It’s supposed to be a lot darker than the sides, but I thought it was a bit too dark). The white balance was set to Auto in my camera and look fine in this case.

4. Above: Here’s a behind-the-scenes shot of the lighting set-up: 17″ beauty dish with a grid: two strip banks in back on the sides with fabric grids. We have a tiny bit of light on the white background to make it a very light gray (if we turned the power up, it would turn solid white). Production photo by Brad Moore.

5. Above: Here’s a composite from the exact shot you see in #4. The two backgrounds (here and at the top) are from an awesome company called “Photo Art Streetscapes” (link). Their stuff costs a bit more, but it’s totally worth it.

As for matching him to his surroundings: I showed the techniques of how to match the overall color and tone of the composited image on my live “Light it, Shoot it, Retouch It” tour, and in my “Light it, Shoot it, Retouch it “ book as well (Amazon or Barnes & Noble), and Matt covers all of this in his Compositing Secrets book, too! (Amazon or Barnes & Noble).

Well, there ya have it —- short and sweet. Hope you all have a fantastic Tuesday! :-)

..when it was out on the road (or if I didn’t come to your city or country)â¦.you can watch the entire seminar online, from start to finish, no matter where you are in the world.

You even get the same tour workbook (but in color no less), plus all freebies I gave out for attendees.

The full-day seminar is now available as a digital download (just like you'd buy a movie online to download to your computer), for just $49.

The short one-minute video above gives you the full scoop, or go to the download site: http://kelbytraining.com/product/light-it-shoot-it-retouch-it-live-download/

d1-41Hey gang, Brad Moore here with a quick walk-through of this photo from a recent assignment…

A couple weeks ago, I had the opportunity to cover the opening of D1 Sports Training’s new facility in Orlando. While I was there, I was able to grab a portrait of one of their trainers, Taylor Scott.

This was the one of the last things I did at the event. Throughout the day, while covering everything else, I was trying to formulate a creative portrait in my mind. I finally decided to just use edge lighting, remembering something a wise man once said… “If you want something to look interesting, don’t light all of it.”

I knew going in that I wanted to have a clean black backdrop for this image, but I didn’t have any seamless paper to create said clean black backdrop. What do you do in this situation? Three things…

1) Camera Settings
First, knock out the ambient light in the room.

I know my shutter speed is going to be about 1/160 of a second because I’m using artificial lights, and that’s a good sync speed.

ISO needs to be as low as possible, ISO 200 in this case, so less light registers in the image.

With those two settings in place, the only variable left is f/stop. At f/10, there’s no ambient light registering in the image, and the strobe lights don’t have to be cranked up too much to register in the image. Exactly where I want to be.

2) Lights
Here’s the lighting setup:

That’s an available light shot of Pete Collins standing in while all the settings are getting dialed in and tweaking the lights.

I used the Elinchrom Ranger Quadra set to 4.0 (about 100Ws), a Rotalux 39″ softbox (sans front diffuser) and a Westcott 12×36″ strip bank. They were positioned in front of Pete/Taylor so that they were basically rim lights.

Here’s how it looks with all the correct camera and light settings dialed in:

And then framed up properly:

You can still see some minor clutter in the background, but that’s easy to clean up in post, which brings us to the third step…

3) Separation from the Wall
That little bit of clutter is showing up in the background because it’s getting a hint of the strobe light. If this had been set up near a wall or closer to any other objects, they would be lit up and even more distracting. That’s why separation between your lights and background are important in creating a clean background.

Here’s the final image again:

Since this shot was for D1, I wanted to make sure there was some branding showing as well. I asked Taylor to step forward, a little closer to the lights, allowing some of the light to wrap around his back to show the branding on his shirt.

In Lightroom, I darkened the blacks around Taylor with the adjustment brush to finish cleaning up the background (no cloning necessary) and bumped up the clarity quite a bit on him.

After that, I jumped over to Photoshop to add some grittiness via high pass sharpening and Nik Filters (the soft light layer blend mode is your friend!).

Hopefully this is helpful and can give you some ideas for creating great images in less than ideal situations!

You can find more from me at BMOOREVISUALS.com, and on Google+ and Twitter

(NOTE: If you watch this one-minute long video above now, you can skip all the way down to the last lne of text for details). 

If you missed my “Light it, Shoot it, Retouch it” LIVE tour, you can now finally experience the entire seminar, from start to finish, and get the same tour workbook (in color no less), plus all freebies I gave out for attendees, starting today no matter where you live as we are making the day available as a digital download (just like you’d buy a movie online to download).

Although I was able to visit many major cities in the US, Canada, and even three cities in Europe, there were just so many places we didn’t get to visit with the tour. But now no matter where you are, you can attend the entire event, just as it happened, live from beginning to end. You’ll learn all the techniques, all the lighting, all the retouching, and you’ll absolutely have the best seat in the house, but at literally half the price.

We are SO excited to bring this to you our friends around the world —- our first-ever start-to-finish full day seminar available now anywhere you are.

Here’s the link to download the full digital seminar today (it’s just $49.99 US).

The new issue of “Light It Magazine” (issue #8) is out, and available in Apple’s Newsstand App on the iPad (it’s only $2.99. Crazy cheap!), and (BIG NEWS) we are currently beta-testing the Android version and so far the testing is going great (the mag looks and works great — just a couple more things to address before we release it, so it won’t be long now).

This issue I’ve got a behind-the-scenes “Photo Recipes” food shoot using two Westcott TD-6 Spiderlites along with some things you can pick up at your local hardware store (seen above).

This is one of my favorite issues so far. Great stuff from Joel Grimes (you’re seeing the opening page above, which includes an embedded video), plus Frank Doorhof always brings great stuff,  and there’s lots of cool stuff cover to cover.

It’s available now, so I hope you’ll check out the new issue, (which costs less than the price of about any McDonald’s Extra Value meal, which that unto itself either says a lot what an incredible value this magazine is, or about how expensive Extra Value meals have become). ;-)

P.S. We now have annual subscriptions available for just $19.99. Insane-o cheap. Cheaper than dinner at Chili’s (well, if you at least order chicken Fajita’s, some chips and salsa, and maybe a Corona) and you get a whole year of issues. Seriously, that’s hundreds of pages of lighting techniques, so subscribe at the App store right this very minute before your fajitas get cold. 

 

 

 

 

Joe’s brand new tour (produced by Kelby Training) kicks off in Canada next month and today on Joe’s blog he wrote about how the tour came to be, and what he’ll be teaching during this incredible workshop.

Seriously, Imagine spending the day learning all the amazing things you can do with the simplest of lighting set-ups, using just one flash (or maybe two), from the magical unicorn of hot shoe flash himself (OK, that last part is what I call him, but I don’t think I’m alone). ;-)

Here’s how Joe described the tour in his blog post today:

“The point of the day is keeping it super basic, super simple and super fast. “

Here’s the link to Joe’s blog to hear it in his words.

> If you’re like me and you’re thinking, “Hey, it’s Joe. I’m “in!” then here’s the page with all the info and sign-up form.

We’re working on the dates for Joe’s US Tour right now and they’ll be announced very shortly, but if you’re in Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Calgary or Vancouver, you’re in for an incredible day of learning. It’s just $99 ($79 for NAPP members).

Congrats to Joe on launching the new tour and I can’t wait till he comes near me — I”ll be there for sure!

 

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