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Get Up to Speed Fast on the New Photoshop 2020 with Scott Kelby

There’s a new version of Photoshop in town! Get up to speed fast with Scott Kelby where you’ll be introduced to all the new features debuted at Adobe MAX as well as all the new features Adobe has added to Photoshop over the last year. Photoshop 2020 is the best version to date, and it just keeps getting better and better. There’s a lot of cool new features that you’ll want to add to your workflow, so let’s dive in!

In Case You Missed It: Learn Photoshop In One Hour

Join Scott Kelby as he teaches you the essential things you need to learn about Photoshop to get up and running. Photoshop has a lot of depth, but you don’t need to know everything, just the tools people use every day. Starting with a lesson on how to view your photos, Scott moves on to the most commonly used tools such as cropping, Levels adjustments, using Camera Raw as a filter, making selections, removing distractions, understanding layers, and much more. There’s even a bonus lesson on extracting hair from a background. At the end of the hour you’ll be ready to dig deeper into any of the topics you’ve learned, and take it as far as you want to go.

Self-Portrait with Moustache © Harold Davis (2010)

In recent years I have photographed and hiked the Kumano kodo pilgrimage trail sacred to Shugendo Buddhism in Japan. I’ve walked long portions of the Camino de Santiago in Spain with my camera. I’ve taken photos to bring light to the near darkness in Son Doong, the world’s largest cave in Vietnam where fewer people have ventured than have been into space.

As a photography workshop leader, I’ve taught groups of photographers in the United States, France, and many other parts of the world. In the course of my travels when I meet people—and I love to chat with folks along the way—once it becomes known that I am a professional photographer, one question is pretty constant: What kind of photographer are you?

Alone I Stand © Harold Davis (2007)

Generally, when folks ask me this question they are looking for a pretty straightforward answer. Sometimes I wish I could tell them “I photograph children for a portrait studio,” “I am an architectural photographer,” “I am a wedding photographer,” “I photograph jewelry,” or something similarly specific. 

Nautilus in Black and White © Harold Davis (2008)

As I’ll explain later in this blog story, I’ve worked professionally in a number of photographic genres, back at the beginning of my first photography career in the days of analog, film photography.

No knowledge is ever wasted. It’s helpful to have the skillsets from the different photographic niches under my belt, as well as my experiences as a computer programmer, fine-art painter, and a writer. But none of these individually fit what I’ve been doing and what I have regarded as my current profession since the dawn of digital era.

Kiss from a Rose © Harold Davis (2009)

I tell folks who ask that I am a Photographer as Poet. That’s of course the title of this blog story. Stay tuned: in this blog story I’ll tell you what I think being a Photographer as a Poet means, some of the history of how I’ve arrived at this profession and calling, and some words about what it means to have a professional practice as a photographic poet.

Spirals © Harold Davis (2007)

I’ve become so enamored of my job title of Photographer as Poet that I had an inkan—a Japanese “chop” or inked stamp that is sometimes used in place of a signature—created with the characters that roughly translate to this phrase. Sometimes I use my inkan to handstamp and decorate my prints, particularly those printed on Japanese washi.

Peonies mon Amour © Harold Davis (2012), shown printed on washi with hand inkan stamp

What does it mean to be a “Photographer as Poet” professionally? This is often a follow-up question to “What kind of photographer are you?” 

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Good day! It’s #TravelTuesday and because it’s Tuesday, it’s not Scott but me, Dave Williams, fresh from a red-eye flight from Calgary to London, coming at you loud with some kind of photographic wisdom!

Today, I want to touch on reverse engineering a photo, and this is something you can learn a lot more about from Glyn Dewis’ book Photograph Like a Thief if you want to dig deeper. Let’s do it!

So, in Banff National Park, there’s an iconic photo and I wanted it. I’ve preached time and again about being original, but I just wanted this shot bad! There’s a train line running through the park as part of the Canadian Pacific Railway network, and one curve, in particular, facing up to the mountains’ home to Lake Louise and Moraine Lake. It’s Morant’s Curve, named after the Canadian Pacific photographer who took the first photo of the new rail line here.

As you can see here, it’s so popular because of the original shot that there’s a viewing area with railings.

When it comes to reverse engineering a photo, it’s a lot about light. When it comes to photos of people, we can usually work out the lighting quite easily by looking at the edges of the person and the reflection in their eyes to see how they were lit. But, when it comes to landscapes, it’s more about working out the location and the timings, which we can do quite easily with maps and PhotoPills.

What we’re looking for with the light is the time of day, dictating the direction, and other clues that will help us with the scene, like the temperature and tone and the softness.

We also need to reverse engineer the shutter speed and focal length used, so we can apply it to our image, or add a creative flair if we want to put our own spin on it.

The whole process of reverse engineering a photo is a combination of science and art, and we can use it to apply the exact look from the original photo or put it “into our own words” if we want. That’s what I wanted to do, and here’s my shot: –

What I’ve done here is pick a spot slightly back from the gap, giving the train a piece of the image but not the entire focus. The front end creeps through the gap in the trees looking somewhat like a face, and then the rest of the train twists and turns as a leading line toward those epic mountains behind. The whole scene is, of course, iconic, but it has my own little spin on it, too.

Reverse engineering a shot like this is a good skill to apply, and a great way to learn. Have a go at it. I promise you’ll enjoy it, and it will help you in critiquing yourself, as well as deconstructing and analysing a photo.

Much love

Dave

I remembered this tip when I was recording a new class on all the updates, changes, new features and enhancements Adobe has added to Photoshop in the past year (and there are way more than you’d probably think). However, this one is not new — it’s “old school” but I’ll bet ya don’t know this one (it’s that little known). So, first the tip, then more on the course.

Here’s a little teaser about my new Photoshop 2020 course, which will be released later this week.

I’m up in Seattle today for my seminar tomorrow —  the “Ultimate Photography Crash Course.” It’s not too late to join me tomorrow – Here’s the link. 

Have a great Tuesday, everybody!

-Scott

I’m very excited to announce that submissions open today for the prestigious Malta International Photo Awards (MIPA), and I am so honored to be a part of the international judging panel and to be among such an esteemed group of judges.

Here’s a short video (below) about the awards, and the international judging panel.

MIPA Autumn 2019 Intro Video

The MIPA Autumn 2019 Edition is getting closer. Our founder Anja Goder goes through all the recent changes in MIPA as we prepare for this exciting next edition.Submissions will open soon. Stay tuned to this page for more information and details.

Posted by Malta International Photo Award on Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Here’s a link to their official site for more details and to submit your image(s). I hope you’ll consider entering — it’s like I always say, ya never know, right? :)

Good luck everybody, and have a great weekend!

-Scott

P.S. Don’t miss my post today over at LightroomKillerTips called “Why is Lightroom so hard for you?”

The Secrets to Properly Convert Your Images to Black & White with Viktor Fejes

There are a lot of ways to convert a color photo to B&W, but have you ever considered what goes into doing it with the highest level of control by harnessing some of Photoshop’s most powerful tools? If not, then join Viktor Fejes for a deep dive into how to properly convert your photos to B&W. No matter what method you use to convert to B&W you are always concerned with removing color, controlling contrast and tonality, and enhancing detail.

In this class Viktor steps you through his B&W workflow and demonstrates techniques for using adjustment layers, creating a LUT for re-use, dodging and burning, manipulating tonal values locally, bringing out detail, adding grain, and so much more to achieve that B&W mood you had in your minds eye from the start. You’ll come away with a new set of techniques and a greater understanding for the fundamentals of B&W conversions.

In Case You Missed It – Advanced Photoshop: The Psychology and Science Behind Color Grading

Join Viktor Fejes for an advanced look at essential elements of color theory. From understanding color models and the science of RGB, to how to apply this knowledge when performing practical tasks such as color correcting and color grading. Viktor starts with the fundamentals and works up to advanced techniques used in cinema. If you want to manipulate color at will, understand the reasons why, and make your images look fantastic while doing it, then this class is for you.

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