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PROGRAMMING NOTE: Today is Pre-Conference day at the Flash Photography Conference, and I’m kicking it off this morning with a “Flash For Absolute Beginners” Class at 11:15 am ET (even if you miss it, you can watch the archive of the live class for six months after the conference). It’s not too late to join us today, or for the official start tomorrow — Tickets here.

Want to do something for your photography journey that will absolutely, positively make make an impact? Stop what you’re doing, and right now take two minutes and make a print.

If you don’t have your own printer, send it to an online lab (I use both BayPhoto Lab and MPIX.com — both make great prints and both have world-class customer service, and if you don’t already have a lab, try either of these — you’ll love them). You just open an account, upload your image, choose your size and they take it from there. In a day or so, your print arrives. Couldn’t be easier.

Make it a large sized print

You can get a 16″x24″ print from BayPhoto.co or MPIX.com for around for $24. There are few ways you can spend $24 today and effect you or someone you love (a gift?) that can have a bigger impact than a print.

If you’re not sure how to print, this can help:

Here’s a link to that course. You’ll get a lot out of it (I promise).

If you’ve ever wanted your work to live on, to have a bigger impact than it does by just sharing it on Facebook, and if you want those pixels on screen to become something real, something you can hold in your hands, something that will make you feel great inside, make the most of today. Make it “Make a Print Monday” :)

-Scott

On Tuesday, the KelbyOne Flash Photography Conference 2020 kicks off (featuring the world’s #1 wizard of flash, Joe McNally), but the day before I’m doing a pre-conference workshop for people who are absolute flash photography beginners, designed to get folks up and running fast.

I’ll be literally starting from scratch, but I think what most folks will find surprising is how easy is actually is to make professional looking portraits with flash, and I’m sharing a recipe, camera settings, flash settings and all, that works every time (I hear from students all the time who tell me they’ve tried it and it worked perfectly even the first time they tried it).

Then on Tuesday it splits into two training tracks: one for beginners with me, and an intermediate / advanced track with Joe. Although the whole event is live (with Joe up in a studio in Connecticut and me down in Tampa), but we archive the entire conference for six full months so you can go rewatch any sessions, or catch any sessions you missed on either track. I’m putting the official trailer below (it’s really short — it’ll help a lot in you deciding if this is for you).

Photographers from all over have already signed up, and it’s not too late if you want to join us next week.

Here’s the link for tickets and more details.

This is incredible opportunity for anyone whose ever wanted to learn flash, or for existing flash photographers who want to take their skills to the next level fast. Hope I’ll see you online starting Monday, and then all day Tuesday and Wednesday.

Have a great weekend, everybody. Safe safe and sane, and we’ll catch you next week. :)

-Scott

P.S. Joe did a fantastic blog post this week about what he’s teaching at the conference His track is going to be incredible. Here’s the link if you’ve got a sec.

Mickey with Dr. John West and his image at the Mount Miguel open House

My name is Mickey Strand, I am a US Navy Combat Photographer Veteran. I served for 24 years, retiring in San Diego in 2009. I am a professional photographer, involved in many projects, the number is dependent on my ADD. 

Currently, I am photographing members of America’s Greatest Generation, The Veterans of World War II. Collecting stories, memories, and images for future generations from these heroes who signed the dotted line on a check that could have included their life if called upon.

Navy Chief Photographers Mate, Joe Renteria turned 103 years old in July and is still photographing the world today. Joe was a Navy PHC and retired after 20 years.

The project started as a suggestion from a mentor that I should work on my studio portrait lighting by shooting one portrait a month. He suggested I find a subject I was interested in, that it would grant “buy-in” of the work, find something or someone you want to photograph and you’ll work harder on it. This self-assignment started two portrait projects, the Veterans Portrait Series taking on the bulk of my attention.

I was inspired by other Veteran photographers who were shooting Veterans, collecting their images telling these stories, but saying “I want to shoot Veterans”, is like saying you want to learn about photography. I narrowed it down with a concentration on America’s Greatest Generation.

Corporal Seki “Don” served in the US Army with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team (RCT).
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#TravelTuesday today was supposed to involve some actual travel, but because of the decisions of two national governments, I’m stranded in the UK rather than making some epic new content in Norway. Fingers crossed it all gets resolved soon because I’ve just about had enough now! I’m Dave Williams, here for you as always on ScottKelby.com. Today, I want to lay down a quick Adobe Photoshop tip to save you some time with hot pixels. Let’s do it!

Hot pixels can have a number of causes, including sensor faults. If you notice the same dead pixel from one image to the next, it’s a sensor problem that you need to have repaired. Now that bit’s out of the way, what about hot pixels in general? What are they?

Hot pixels are often the result of a sensor that hasn’t received enough light in exposing an image, so they’re likely to appear in areas of shadow. For one of a number of reasons, an individual pixel or a small group of pixels will appear red or white, as if hot, which often stands out as a negative attribute to our image because of its distracting contrast. It’s common for us to get hot pixels on our images of the night sky, particularly when we shoot with no moon in near darkness.

While it’s true that we can find and remove each of these hot pixels ourselves using the Spot Healing Brush tool, there is a simpler way. Take a look at this hot pixel on the left of this image. It’s halfway up and close to the left border.

This one has fallen within a dark mountain range on one of my aurora images. There’s nothing there causing any light; it’s just a glitch of the pixel. Spread across this image are a few hot pixels, and to get rid of them all at once there’s a simple method we can use, with just one filter.

If we select the Dust & Scratches filter from the Noise menu (Filter > Noise > Dust & Scratches), we simply need to select a relatively low option for the pixel Radius—usually no more than 5—and those hot pixels are automatically removed.

Because this hot pixel was just a single pixel rather than a small group, having the Radius set to 1 has removed it. This simple method has saved time in zooming in and scanning over the entire image, and it leaves us able to quickly deal with technical issues in order to focus more of our time and attention on artistic retouching.

Have a great week!

Much love
Dave

Don’t miss out — photographers everywhere are signing up to be a part of this epic two-day, two-track live event next Tuesday/Wednesday featuring the King of Flash, Joe McNally. Details and tickets here.

Here’s wishing you a fantastic week, and good health throughout. #rolltide!

-Scott

P.S. If you missed Terry White’s excellent video on “Which Lightroom is right for you — Cloud or Classic?” here’s a link. Really great info.

Terry White did an awesome video — around just 14 minutes total, on all the new stuff in Photoshop, and it is so great. If you’re not up on all the new features that were announced at Adobe’s MAX conference, you can catch up on it all really quick (and there is some seriously good stuff in this update). Check out Terry’s video below:

Thanks, Terry! :)

Just 11 Days ‘Till “The Flash Photography Conference”

I can’t believe it’s almost here — very exciting! It’s two days live online featuring two live learning tracks (one for flash beginners that I’m teaching and one for intermediate to pro level photographers featuring the King of Flash, the one and only Joe McNally).

I’m putting the official trailer below — check it out (it’s just two minutes) to see if it’s for you:

It’s Tuesday and Wednesday, November 17-18, 2020 (with a total flash beginner’s crash course the day before — free to registered attendees) — you don’t want to miss it. Tickets and details here.

Have a great weekend, everybody! :)

-Scott

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