Posts By Scott Kelby

Moire1a

So, Brad had set up and taken this photo of my gear (for use on Social Media), and when I opened it in Photoshop I noticed something “funky” when I zoomed in on the camera bag on the right…

Moire2a

Above: I zoomed in so you can see it — it’s a “moire” pattern, which is an unwanted repeating color pattern that appears over part of your image, probably most often on clothing (when you least expect it, and sometimes on objects where you’d least expect it, like a camera bag). In this case, it’s that blue and gold series of zebra stripes covering the entire front of the camera bag.

Luckily, this is such a common occurrence that both Lightroom and Photoshop’s Camera Raw have a feature dedicated to fixing it.

Moire3a

Above: In Lightroom’s Develop Module (or Photoshop’s Camera Raw, which is what I’m showing here), go to the Adjustment Brush, and in the the Brush controls you’ll see a slider for “Moire Reduction” (shown circled here in red). I started by getting the amount at +50 to see how it would do.

Moire4a

Above: I set my brush to a large size and started painting over the bag and…voila! The Moire is gone! Well, at a setting of 50% it was mostly gone, but I could still see a bit, so I dragged the slider to the right to +65 and then it was gone.

Moire5a

Above: Here’s a before and after, where you can see the blue and gold on the left, and on the right in the “after” view, you can see it’s pretty much gone.

The first part is beginning to recognize the signs of a moire pattern, because after all, if you don’t know what it looks like, you won’t realize it needs correcting. At least now, if you do run across a moire, you know how to quickly and easily fix it. :)

Ahhhhh, that’s a moire! (sorry, I couldn’t help myself).

Hope you have a great Tuesday!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. If you entered my giveaway (over on my Facebook page) for a free ticket to my seminar next week in Richmond and Atlanta, I posted the winner’s names this morning. 

I follow a number of online guitar teachers, and I recently read an email from guitar instructor Griff Hamlin that really struck a chord with me (no pun intended, but it’s just so on the money) — his article was asking the same question above, but about progressing at learning guitar, and in not so many words he asked “…are you noodling or practicing?”

I wanted to illustrate this concept, so I grabbed a guitar, and Brad made this quick iPhone video (right before I discussed this same concept on “The Grid”)  so the production quality is “iPhone grade” but you’ll totally get the point. Plus, they’re really short videos — less than 30-seconds).

First, here’s the difference between Noodling and Practicing:

This is Noodling (below): 

https://youtu.be/ZxwqVdDSF1o

It’s fun noodling around and playing some riffs you already know but you’re not getting any better at guitar. It’s not moving you closer to where you want to be. You’re not improving, you’re not growing — you’re just having fun, and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with having fun — as long as you realize it’s nothing more than that.

This is Practicing: 

https://youtu.be/TXd52xqqi8I

That video above of me playing different positions of the Pentatonic scale is as boring to play as it is to watch, but that’s OK because that is something that actually does make you better. It’s practice. It makes you grow. You’re improving. And if you do enough of it, you know what happens? Suddenly your noodling becomes a whole lot more fun, because now you can do things you could never do before, and you’re able to play things you never dreamed you could, at speeds you thought you couldn’t. That’s the power of real practice.

It’s the same thing with photography
If you grab your camera, head out the door, and just kind of shoot whatever comes your way — you’re noodling.  It’s fun — just walking around and taking photos of whatever — I do it myself when I get a chance, but it doesn’t make you better at photography. It doesn’t improve your photography. It doesn’t make you grow, but it’s fun and there’s nothing wrong with fun, as long as you understand that’s what it is.

The problem is — I’m not sure a lot of photographers realize that. And that’s precisely why they’re not getting better. They’re doing a lot of noodling, and not a lot of real practicing at all.

How do you practice photography?
Practice has a goal. Practice is a lot of repetition. Practice is trying a technique again and again to until you really have it — you really understand it – you can do it without thinking. If you find yourself working with a hot shoe flash, and you’re moving it an inch or two after each shot, and then seeing the difference it makes in the shadows on your subject’s face — that’s practice.

If you’re doing street photography, and you go out — not trying to make a great picture, but trying to practice your timing, or setting out to look for interesting shadows and only shooting those, or maybe you’re looking for nothing but contrasting colors, or going way outside your comfort zone and taking pictures of people (if you’ve been uncomfortable with that in the past). That’s practice.

Practice isn’t a lot of fun, but if you do it a lot, you’ll start to see a difference fast. You’ll grow. You’ll see the results. And then, when you do go out shooting for fun (noodling), your noodling will be more fun because you’ll come back with more keepers, and when you feel like you’re making better images, the “fun” suddenly become a lot more fun, and a lot more meaningful. You’re not just out there hoping to get lucky any more. Now you know what you’re doing, and you can have more fun doing it.

Now that you know the difference…
Ask yourself, truthfully…have you been practicing or noodling?

I realized that with my guitar playing, I was noodling a lot, and not practicing nearly enough. I made a conscious decision to change that, and I already have. Same with my photography. If I want to have more fun, and get better results, I know exactly which path I need to take. I hope this helped you a little bit on your path, too. My thanks to Griff Hamlin for inspiring me, and making it clear for me. I love the difference a great teacher can make.

Hope you have a great week, everybody. Let’s get some good practicing in. :)

Best,

-Scott

Woman holding blank sign in front her face, on color background

Happy Friday everybody! On Monday and Tuesday we looked at some of the best, and most commented-upon Guest Blog posts from this past year, and today we’re continuing my “Best of 2015 on the Blog” with a look at some of the most popular posts overall.

Here we go:

(1) I’m Dumping My Apple Watch
With 228 comments, it was my most-commented upon post of the year, which should give you some idea of the emotional weight people put behind (or against) anyone mentioning they bought an Apple product. If you read the comments on this post, you’ll be surprised at how nasty some people got because I said I was returning my watch. I didn’t tell anyone they should sell theirs, mind you — I just talked about why it didn’t work for me. Apparently, that was enough for some people to totally lose their minds, and on both sides of the fence.

(2) Are You Shooting With a Lens in that “No Man’s Land Focal Range.” 

You would have thought I mentioned an Apple product with as many angry comments as this solicited. I was providing an idea, a thought some photographers might just consider, but all it did was make anybody who owns a 24-70mm lens come out in angry defense of it. It spawned discussions, blog posts, and forum rants on sites around the Web. Apparently, not a topic you can have a rational discussion about.

(3) I Hate To Admit This, But I Just Bought Another Apple Watch

When Apple introduced Watch OS2, it addressed my major complaint about the watch, so I bought another one (I had returned the original one for a full refund), and of course, once again some folks lost their mind, and said I did the whole thing as a publicity stunt. Trust me, very few people would think the “human pin cushion style” of comments I got on either post would constitute as “good publicity.”

(4) Could it be? Yes it is! Another Down & Dirty Trick?
I started doing a series of Photoshop special effects every Friday, and it started out pretty well, with a nice stream of feedback, but the more I did, the less people commented and giving feedback of any kind (this is good, this is bad, etc.), and when you’re writing stuff and it takes a really long time to do each one, and nobody seems to care, you stop, which is what I did. At least this one, early on, got some feedback.

(5) Seven Things They Need to Fix in Periscope
Thankfully, they have already addressed a lot of these.

OK that’s the top five. I wanted to share another few that were among the most popular, and all definitely worth checking out: They are: 

1. 7 Reasons why Photographers Need to Be on Instagram (link)

2. Kalebra Kelby’s Guest Blog (link)

3. If You Were Only Allowed to Have 10 Pieces of Photographic Gear, What Would They Be? (link)

4. You know what this country needs? 1-million more Selfie Sticks ;-) (link)

5. It’s “Reprocess Your Old Images Tuesday (link)

6. I’m Too Old To Be Making Rookie Mistakes Like This… (link)

7. It’s “Back Up Your Photos” Tuesday (link)

Well, there ya have it — some light reading for the weekend. Hope yours is a great one! (

Best,

-Scott

P.S. My first full-day seminars of the year are coming up. I’m in Richmond on the 27th, and in Atlanta on the 29th. Hope I get to see you there (here’s the link with details). 

bestof2015

Yesterday, we looked at our readers Top Five most-commented on guest blog posts. Today we’re going to celebrate 5 Guest Blog posts that totally rocked (and were totally under-rated), but didn’t get the comments (but they’re so good I felt they deserved special recognition). Here we go (in no particular order):

Corey Lack

If you ever felt that what was keeping you from making great images was equipment (or the lack thereof), you’ll definitely want to read Corey’s take on this. It’s a frank, refreshing look at a topic that a lot of folks struggle with. Very well written (and lots of great images). Here’s the link to his Guest Post.

corey

Courtney Dailey

Besides some wonderful images, Courtney delivered some straight up great business advice about licensing your images, and her no-nonsence advice on the business side of photography should be required reading for every new pro (or anybody who wants to go pro). Here’s the link to her Guest Post.

coutney

Jacob Slaton

I love posts that challenge you, inspire you, push you, inform you, and still find a way to share some great images, and that’s why I love Jacob’s Guest Post. Really well done, and if you take the time to read it, you’ll be glad you did. Here’s the link to his post.

Jacob

Stacy Pearsall

Stacy is one of the most inspiring photographers out there today — not just because of her wonderful images, but her personal story, and the stories of the people’s lives she captured are both very special. Her project will tug at your heart strings, but it’s worth it. Here’s the link to her Guest Post.

stac

Leo Trevino!

It’s kind of a sad story, but it’s one that every photographer should read, for more reasons than one. He shared his heartbreaking story to help us, and how they persevered from a really bad situation is actually very inspiring. Make sure you read to the end – there’s some very good hard-earned advice there we all need to hear. Here’s a link to his Guest Post.

leo

My thanks to all my guest bloggers, and a special thanks to these five unsung heroes. I hope you’ll give them a look.

More to come on Friday in our “Best of the Blog in 2015.” :)

Best,

-Scott

bestof2015

Hi Gang: it’s my annual tradition to kick off the New Year with a quick look back at the most popular, and most commented-upon posts of 2015 here on my blog, and some of the fun stuff we shared during the past year.

This year, I’m doing it a little bit differently, and breaking it into categories (so it’s more than just a long list — but something you can explore), so let’s kick it off with the top 5 GUEST BLOGS of 2015.

Holding a sign.

NOTE: These were chosen based on the total number of comments garnered by their posts.

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Kevin Mullins

Kevin’s post was the #1 most commented-on guest post of the year, and when you read it (and see the images), you’ll know why. It’s the story of how he quit his job to become a wedding photographer, and a darn amazing one he is at that (he did the right thing). Very well written — beautiful images — and you’ll learn a lot from it. It has everything that makes a guest blog post great. You owe it to yourself to read it, even if you don’t shoot weddings.  Here’s the link to Kevin’s guest post.

kevin

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Kaylee Greer

Kaylee’s post about becoming a Dog Photographer, and how she works with dogs (I swear, she’s a dog whisperer), really enchanted readers (she had over 100 comments!), and people just love her (heck, we love her — you’ll be seeing a lot more of Kaylee at KelbyOne in 2016). Here’s the link to her guest post.

kaylee

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Nick Fancher

With nearly 100 comments, Nick really resonated with the community here. He had such clever hot shoe flash techniques that we asked him back to expand on some of them. This is really useful, real world stuff, and he did a great job of showing you what he did, and how easy it was to pull off. Very useful, fun, and interesting. You’ll want to check it out. Here’s the link to his Guest Blog.

nick

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Regina Pagles

I’ve been a fan of Regina’s work for years, and she’s been a guest blogger here before sharing her work, and this time she shared the entire process, including post production, for creating her amazing portraits. Of course, what makes Regina special as a photographer is more than just where she puts the light or how she does her post processing, but I think it’s awesome that she was willing to share those with us. Here’s the link to Regina’s Guest Post.

regina

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David Molnar

David’s post is a bold, revealing, honest, intriguing, and just wonderful piece of work. There is so much to learn from his story. You’ll be shocked. Inspired. Motivated. Stunning. And it holds the power to change how you think about you, your career, and where you are on your photography journey. I’m so impressed with what David did. You will be, too. Here’s the link to David’s post.

david

This is really good stuff
I hope today, at some point, you take the time to give these few articles a read. They are so good. Each one has it’s own bent, but they will make motivate you, make you laugh, inspire you, inform you, make you cry, make you rethink thinks, teach you new things, and I promise they will be worth your time.

Also, I want to thank these photographers, and all the Guest Bloggers who share their time and techniques here each year. It’s a lot of work, and they take it very seriously, and it shows. I’m very grateful (and I know my readers are, too).

Tomorrow, has some good stuff, too!
Today’s picks were based on how many commented. For Tomorrow’s “Best of the Blog” I’m picking five Guest Blog Posts that were underrated — great posts that, for whatever reason, didn’t get that many comments. If you got a lot out of these posts today, you’ll definitely want to check them out tomorrow.

Thanks for stopping today. :)

Best,

-Scott

 

It’s Friday. Here’s what’s up:

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How ’bout a quick tour of the KelbyOne Headquarters?

Mia McCormick takes you on a quick rollerblade tour of our Headquarters down in Florida (this is an excerpt from our members-only monthly podcast called “Backstage Pass.”

https://youtu.be/c68PrzldkUA

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New Years Resolutions For Better Photos in 2016

It was our first episode of the new year, and the feedback has been fantastic! If you want to start your photographic year off on the right foot, check this one out.

https://youtu.be/brEOeu9uzrw

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Dog Photographer Kaylee Greer Gives Us Some Love

I love Kaylee’s story on so many levels, but helping people realize their dreams, and create the type of images they’ve always dreamed about is what we’re all about, and when someone goes from a student to a master, as educators, you can imagine how proud we are that we played a small role. If you’ve got a sec, you’ll dig this.

https://youtu.be/zho5oCYAG7o

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My Seminar is Coming to Richmond and Atlanta in a few weeks!

..and I want you to come out and spend the day with me. The details about the seminar are in the video below, and the full day seminar is just $99 (well, it’s actually only $89 if you sign up right now). Here’s the link

https://youtu.be/HYXRl4uxw6M

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Tom Bol on Gear For Shooting Time-lapse With Your DSLR

Here’s a quick clip from one of the best teachers out there — adventure photographer Tom Bol — on the gear for shooting time lapse (it’s an excerpt from his KelbyOne class on it). It’s short, and very worth checking out.

https://youtu.be/TUOJmZo4Y9Y

Hope you all have a fantastic weekend, and we’ll see ya back here on Monday!

Best,

-Scott

 

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