Posts By Scott Kelby

Hi gang, and welcome to Tuesday. Day Nine in this month we call May. ;-)

I wanted to share a tip with you I did a while back on LightroomKillerTips.com (the other daily blog I write, in an effort to ensure I never actually sleep), and I still get comments about it. It’s a feature Adobe snuck into Lightroom in one of those late-night under cover of darkness updates they do to Lightroom, and it’s about why the added ability to move an Edit pin can be a huge timesaver. Check it out below:

Hope you found that helpful (it’s pretty handy, right?). :)

Have a great Tuesday everybody, and we’ll catch ya back here tomorrow for Guest Blog Wednesday!

Best,

-Scott

Hi gang, and happy Monday. It’s going to be a great week! :)

Just a quick tip today, but the thing I’m going to show you is pretty hidden, and you’d use it when a tool starts behaving differently than it usually does. You might have a made a change to a setting up in the Options Bar the last time you were you using Photoshop, and you can’t remember which setting you changed that’s now causing it to act wonky. If that happens, here what ya do:

Above: Look up at the Options Bar up top. On the very far left you see an icon of the tool you currently have selected. You see that little down-facing arrow to the immediate right of it? If you click that, any tool presets you have for that tool pop-down in a menu (as shown here, but I don’t’ have any tool presets for the Move tool, but the menu pops down either way). However, there’s something hidden here.

Above: If instead, you hold the Command-key on Mac (Ctrl-key on PC), instead you get a pop-up menu with two options: (1) Reset Tool. That resets all of the settings back to their default for just the currently selected tool (in this case, I have the Healing Brush selected, so it resets the Option Bar settings for just that one tool). If you choose ‘Reset All Tools’ it does just what it says — it resets every tool back to its factory fresh default setting (and just know if you need to choose this one, you musta really messed up somethin’ big time!). :-)

Anyway, just a quickie but I know some folks who could get a lot out of resetting a tool or two.

Did you catch ‘The Grid” last Wednesday?
It’s my weekly photography show, and last week my guests were my awesome wife Kalebra and our in-house producer Jen Coffin, and our topic was “How to produce your next shoot.” Jen and Kalebra had some great insights, and I shared my own workflow for setting up a location shoot.  If you’ve got a few minutes, I’ve embedded that episode above (you can let it play in the background while you do other stuff, ya know…like work). ;-)

Here’s wishing you a great week, and that it starts off with a much better than usual Monday!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. I’m about 11 days from my being in Minneapolis with my “Lightroom On Tour” full-day seminar. I’m in Indy four days later. Tickets and info here. 

Above: Some images from our gallery opening for KelbyOne member, and the first artist featured in “The Gallery at KelbyOne,” photographer Mark Wegner (seen in the top left image).

Wednesday on ‘The Grid” Kalebra announced some very exciting news — we’re opening submissions again for KelbyOne members to be considered for their own “solo artist gallery show” in our photographic gallery located at our headquarters in Tampa. It’s called “The Gallery at KelbyOne.” 

Our goal behind the gallery is to find an undiscovered artist within our KelbyOne community that we can raise up, celebrate, and expose them and their work to a wider audience.

Here’s how it works: 

  1. From the submissions, we will choose a single winner (here’s the link to submit a link to your portfolio, or Facebook album, or online gallery – we’re looking for a body of work) Note: this competition is only open to KelbyOne members.
  2. We will fly that winner (from anywhere in the world) and a guest of their choosing to the gallery for their solo gallery showcasing their work, where we’ll feature 14-18 of their images (beautifully printed and displayed by Bay Photo Lab)
  3. They will cut the ribbon on their solo gallery opening welcoming the crowd to a wine and cheese reception held in their honor that evening in the gallery
  4. Following the reception, we’ll move to our theater for an interview with the artist, streamed live around the world
  5. The artist will receive all the prints from the exhibition (courtesy of Bay Photo Lab), and one of their images will be included in our permanent collection

Note: The deadline for submissions is: May 15, 2017, at 11:59 PM EDT.

Here’s a short behind-the scenes video from our last opening, featuring photographer Mark Wegner. 

For a detailed Q&A on how this all works, check out my post from the previous opening (here’s the link).

We asked our first featured artist, the wonderful Mark Wegner, to share a bit about his experience at his gallery opening. Here’s what Mark had to say:

“I’ve been fortunate to participate in some gallery showings over the years but never a solo show. The staff, the professionalism, and of course the physical show itself at ‘ The Gallery at KelbyOne’ far exceeded my already high expectations when I was initially informed of my selection. Even as my photography career continues to move forward, I am not sure the experience at Kelby One could ever be equaled.  It’ll be a memory for both myself and my family that’ll last a lifetime.” –Mark Wegner

You could be next. :)

Once again, here’s the submission link for KelbyOne members. I wish you all good luck, and I hope to meet you in person soon at your own gallery opening. :)

Have a great weekend,

-Scott

Hi, gang – Happy Tuesday! Today I wanted to share some Lens Correction stuff in Photoshop (this works in Lightroom, too!) that a lot of folks have overlooked (like the Aspect slider for one). This is really powerful stuff — it uses a number of different parts of the Lens Correction and Transform panel, but it’s good solid stuff; it’s easy to use, and there will be times when you really oughta be using it.

I made a video for ya (below). Lots of little tips inside this one:

Again — that works the same way in Lightroom — the panels are just in a different location.

Hope you found that helpful. :)

I’m in Indy in three weeks from today with my Lightroom Seminar
You can be there, too. Here’s the link with details. 

Have a great Tuesday everybody, and see you tomorrow for “Guest Blog Wednesday.”

Best,

-Scott

It was during the conference wrap-up at Photoshop World, just after Larry Becker’s presentation of the Guru Awards, and I’m sitting backstage when my show director told me it was time to get ‘mic’d up” for my closing comments to the crowd. I headed over to the audio crew, and while they were running the mic cable down the back of my jacket, I looked up at one of the huge screens and saw that my book publisher, Nancy Davis of Peachpit Press had taken the stage and was addressing the crowd.

When you’re backstage, if you’re not wearing a headset, you can’t hear the audio from the stage (the audio speakers are on the other side of the curtain, facing away from you, so I can’t actually hear what Nancy is saying — it just sounds like muffled voices, but a graphic appears on the center screen and I see covers of my books from over the years appearing quickly one-by-one, and then I am absolutely floored to see the headline “Over 5-Million Copies Sold!” in huge letters across the screen. My jaw dropped. I literally had no idea. The last time anyone had shared an overall sales number was when I hit 1-million, and I figured they would have told me when I hit two million, but not a word until that moment. I was stunned.

I ran up on stage, hugged Nancy and thanked her, then looked out at the wonderful cheers of a standing ovation from the Photoshop World crowd, with my loving wife Kalebra in the front row (who knew about it all but somehow managed to keep it a secret). It was all pretty overwhelming, but it was at that moment that I realized I should say a few words. I was not at all prepared to make a short speech, but I stumbled my way through this surreal moment and left the stage a bit dazed and amazed.

Now that I’ve had a few days to come back down to earth (and get some much-needed sleep), I want to do it right. I want to express my sincere gratitude to all of you who have read my books, passed them on to friends, shared photos of the covers, tweeted about them, written blog posts about them, did reviews on Amazon, created YouTube videos about them, or just dropped me a line to say thanks.

A very special thanks to my amazing wife Kalebra — her fingerprints are on every book I’ve ever written. Thank you for being my idea generator, sounding board, advice desk, tie breaker, creative consultant, and for getting me through some really tough books that I otherwise wouldn’t have survived. She is my partner in every book we create, and I couldn’t do any of this without her (and wouldn’t want to). Thank you, my love.

I’m indebted to my in-house book editor Kim Doty, and my Art Director Jessica Maldonado. They are a big part of the reason for those sales, and they are as committed, and talented of a team as there is in this industry. I consider myself very blessed to get to work with them each day. I am surrounded by an incredible team here at KelbyOne and pinch myself daily that I have the job I do, and the best team in the business to help me produce these books.

Getting to write books is a privilege and one I never take for granted.
I’m very thankful to Nancy Davis and her team at Peachpit Press who are so committed to making books that really help people. I’m honored by the readers who’ve taken a chance on me and my books, and for any of their success in Photoshop, Photography, or Lightroom that I contributed to even in the smallest way, I’m forever grateful. Seeing their success and progress is a thrill and it keeps me wanting to write more books, to share the latest things I’ve learned, and to keep us all moving ahead doing the one thing that we all want to do — to simply make better images.

Thanks for letting my books be a part of your photographic, Photoshop, and Lightroom education. It is truly an honor.

Best,

-Scott

Happy Friday, everybody. (even if you don’t watch the tip – make sure you read my P.S. at the bottom of the post. It’s guaranteed to make you wish I was younger and had more hair). 

I’ve got a great tip for you today from our dear friend, UK-based graphic designer Dave Clayton, who shared this tip on ‘The Grid” on Wednesday and people were just loving it. Alan Hess wrote “This will change my workflow forever!” and I gotta tell ya — I agree (I didn’t know this tip either). Check out this short video we made just for you guys on the blog here today:

Pretty sweet, right? Thanks, Dave (after speaking at Photoshop World, he came and taped two online classes for KelbyOne — one on Photoshop design for social media, and one straight-up design class for Photoshop users). Such a great guy (and such a great tip!).

Hope you have a great weekend, and we’ll catch you back here next week (well, at least that’s the plan). ;-)

Cheers,

-Scott

P.S. Tomorrow night I’m playing a gig on drums — it’s my high-school reunion (well, technically it’s the year before I graduated reunion), but I’m playing with the same guys I played with back in high school in my first band (three of them were seniors, I was a junior, so it’s really their reunion). Nevertheless, I’m playing it — a bunch of classic rock songs from the late 70s/early 80s (same stuff we played back then), and a couple of newer songs. Yes, I’m making my wife Kalebra go, too. I make her come watch me play every five years as some kind of cruel punishment. She has dubbed it as the “Not my reunion” gig. Follow her tomorrow night on Twitter for many photos and sadly hilarious commentary. Her Twitter handle is @kalebrakelby – it’s gonna rock! (or something like it). 

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