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  • Category Archives Photoshop

    WOW----what a night! No doubt, it was a lot of fun, but it was also very humbling to look out from the stage and see the Knoll Brothers (both Thomas and John Knoll), and about 70 of Adobe's Photoshop engineers, along with lots of Adobe execs and directors, and well...I was incredibly nervous! (That's me below posing with Thomas and John----the Knoll brothers who originally created Photoshop,  right after the event). (All photos by RC Concepcion) Adobe's own Russell Brown (below) did an absolutely hilarious, bring-down-the-house, totally amazing presentation about the history of Photoshop that was so good, he got a standing ovation. Adobe's VP of their Creative Business Unit John Loiacono was the featured presenter (better known as "Johnny L" to Photoshop World Keynote attendees---shown below before the doors opened), and Photoshop big wig Kevin Connor did the first public demo of some…

    Greeting from San Francisco, where tonight NAPP (the National Assn. of Photoshop Professionals) and Adobe are hosting a special party to celebrate Photoshop's 20th Anniversary, and we're broadcasting the whole event LIVE on the Web, and you're invited!!! You'll see live Photoshop tricks from: Dave Cross Matt Kloskowski RC Concepcion Corey Barker Julieanne Kost Terry White Russell Brown Johnny L and Yours Truly Along with some "Surprise Guests." :) I hope you'll join us tonight, no matter where you are in the world. It's going to be an incredible night, and I wouldn't be surprised if you guys saw a sneak peek of some Photoshop 'things' NOBODY has ever seen before! Don't miss it (it's at 7:30 Pacific Time tonight!). It'll be broadcast on this page right here. See you then! -Scott

    I've got a few more details for you about the Live Webcast of the big party/presentation/Photoshop love-fest happening this Thursday night (the 18th) in San Francisco celebrating the 20th Anniversary of Photoshop (if you hadn't heard about it, here's the link). Anyway, here's what I know so far: (1) You sign up here (it's free): http://www.photoshopuser.com/photoshop20th (2) The Live Webcast starts at 7:30 pm Pacific Time (10:30 EST). (3) There are some VERY special guests making an appearance that night. (4) Matt, Dave Cross, Corey, RC, and I will all be on stage showing cool Photoshop stuff, as well as Adobe's Julieanne Kost, Terry White, Russell Brown, and Adobe VP John Loiacono. (5) That's all I know. At least now anyway. Tomorrow, I may know more but hey, ya never know. That's it gang. I hope you can join us, because it's shaping up…

    Thanks to everybody who shared their views on the HDR issue last Friday (link). When it comes to HDR, it seems like most folks are on one side or the other, with very little middle ground----you either like it or you really, really hate it. One comment posted by a reader named Cory really stuck out to me. It's short and sweet, but says volumes. The biggest trigger point for most commenters seemed to be the amount or style of HDR tonemapping applied to a photo, and they seemed to feel that the over-processing was strictly to hide bad photographic technique. So, if a photographer creates an HDR photo, and even if they over-process it, does that somehow instantly mean that they're now a bad photographer? Not everybody that uses over-the-top HDR effects uses them as a crutch. They may just like they way…

    In honor of Photoshop's 20th Anniversary (this Thursday, Feb. 18th), the gang here at NAPP (the National Assn. of Photoshop Professionals) put together a Photoshop Trivia Quiz on Photoshop's history, what features were added when, and stuff like that. The quiz is just for fun, of course, but it's harder than you might think (I did "OK" on it, meaning I passed, but I didn't do well enough to brag about my score). If you've got a couple of minutes, click this link to take the quiz and see how you do. (NOTE: if you do take the quiz and get a great score---don't post a comment with your score. It'll only make me feel even worse). ;-)

    A week or so ago, by buddy Dave Cross had a great post called "The Debate about HDR", which talked about the strong feelings photographers have about HDR, both pro and con (here's the link). But what really caught my attention was a comment posted by one of his readers, because I’ve heard other photographers say the same thing, but none as succinctly as this reader’s comment: “I too use to love it...now, not so much...and for some reason, once I quickly identify the HDR effect, my opinion of the picture drops a notch." This reminds me of something my teenage son does. If it hears a song on the radio from one of his favorite new bands, and I tell him, "Oh, that's a remake of an old song from the 70s or 80s---no matter how much he liked that song---it now drops…

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