Category Archives Adobe

(1) Fascinating interview with the man who wrote Photoshop, Thomas Knoll
A really great look at Photoshop’s history, evolution and much more. Very frank, revealing, and refreshing. Great stuff  (click the video above to jump over to Vimeo to watch the interview — Vimeo wouldn’t let me embed it here, but you can watch it there).

(2) Adobe’s photographers bundle deal is now available
I know a lot of folks have been waiting for the $9.99 per month bundle deal for the latest versions of both Photoshop & Lightroom (for previous owners of Photoshop, all the way back to CS3), to become available, and now it’s here. Here’s the link for more details. I did a post with more info shortly after Adobe’s announcement during the Photoshop World keynote — here’s that link.

(3) Adobe announces 1-million Creative Cloud paid user mark (hit way ahead of schedule)
Remember when I said Adobe wasn’t going to abandon the subscription-only plan. This is yet another reason why. This report was before they released the $9.99 Photographer’s bundle, so I imagine this number is now going to skyrocket. I’ve been talking to more and more photographers out on the road who are totally on board with this new deal, citing how hair the price is (and I agree). More about this below.

(4) Talking about Adobe’s $9.99 Photographer’s Bundle Deal on “The Grid”
If you missed the episode above of our weekly show for photographers, “The Grid,” in this episode we started the show with some important discussions about Adobe’s $9.99 photographers bundle. You can watch it right above.

(5) New versions of Photoshop and Lightroom released
Adobe has recently released new versions of both Photoshop and Lightroom 5 with new features and bug fixes. If you’re a Creative Cloud user, you can download the update from the Creative Cloud widget thingy. If you’re a Lightroom 5 user stand-alone user, you can download the Lightroom 5.2 free update  here (for Mac) or here (for Windows).

OK, that’s all the Photoshop news for this Tuesday, but….
I’ve got one more semi-related, yet totally not-related news: Tomorrow on “The Grid” it’s our popular “Blind Photo Critique” show, so If you’d like to have your work considered for tomorrow’s photo blind critiques (we show your images but don’t mention your name on the air), just leave us a link to 3 to 5 images that show off your work AT THIS LINK:http://kelbytv.com/thegrid/critique/

From those, we’ll pick 15 to 20 photographer’s work to go over on Wednesday’s show (not based on who posted first — we choose based on showing variety and images we think can help our viewers), and the live show is broadcast TOMORROW at 4:00 pm ET athttp://www.kelbytv.com/thegrid  — join me and Matt LIVE tomorrow — See you then. :-)

Since Adobe announced their Creative Cloud subscription-only business model, I’ve been saying the same thing again and again — “… the deal just isn't there for photographers yet.”

Well, that all changed during the opening keynote at Photoshop World last week in Vegas when Winston Hendrickson (Adobe’s Vice President of Engineering for Digital Imaging, and a serious sports photographer himself), announced a better deal than I was ever expecting: if you have any previous version of Photoshop (all the way back to CS3), you can get the combo of both Photoshop CC and Lightroom 5 for just $9.99 a month (as long as you take them up on the offer by Dec 31, 2013).

Much better than I was expecting
I had been talking with Adobe about a deal like this for photographers since they first announced the subscription-only plan, and the number I had been hearing was $19.99 for the two. I had been pulling for (and hoping) they would offer it at just $14.99 instead which I thought was a very fair price. $9.99 wasn’t even on my radar at all. When I heard, just a few days before the keynote, that they were going to offer both at $9.99 a month, I was pretty stunned. I never saw a price that low coming. That’s about 33¢ a day for Photoshop. And Lightroom. The latest versions. I know we waited a while for this deal, but at least it was worth the wait.

Doing The Math
To upgrade Photoshop to the latest version was usually $199. Lightroom’s yearly upgrade is around $79. That’s around $280 every 18th months to stay up to date. Now it’s just $180 over 18 months and you’re always on the latest version of both with all the latest features. Plus, you get 20GB of online storage (if you want it), and a Behance.com ProSite membership as well. The math works.

I’ve talked to a lot of photographers since the deal was announced last Wednesday, and they all really felt Adobe stepped up on this one, and that this was a more than fair deal. I totally agree.

So, how long does that price hold?
Forever! (OK, Adobe didn’t use the word “Forever” because there’s no way their lawyers would ever let them do that, so this is just me talking, but my understanding is they will hold that $9.99 rate for anyone who gets in on the program before that cutoff date, as long as they stay as subscribers. If they drop off at some point, and they want to come back into the program, they’ll have to come back at the regular price of $19.99. Again, that’s not Adobe talking, that’s just my understanding, but that is my understanding. That being said, I can’t image that in the year 2525, if man is still alive, that it won’t shoot up to $11.00 or $12.00 a month, but I believe they plan on holding it there for the foreseeable future).

I don’t have all the answers about specifics like “What if I’m already subscribed to Photoshop CC by itself?” or any of the myriad of questions existing subscribers might have, but Adobe published an FAQ with lots more details and specifics right here.

However, Here are five things I think you should know about this deal:

(1) Don’t let the word “Cloud” throw you off
You don’t run Photoshop or Lightroom in a browser (huge total myth). In fact, just forget the word “Cloud” altogether — think ” App store” instead, because the only time you’ll use your browser is to download Photoshop and Lightroom onto your computer, where they work and run just like always (unless you choose to use their online storage option).

(2) You don’t have to stay connected to the Internet
Another myth. It just checks once a month. One time. Just a few seconds.

(3) There is a difference between “Limited Time Offer” and an “Introductory Price.”
Adobe is making this deal available until the end of the year. That’s a “limited time offer” not to be confused with an “Introductory Price” which is a price that goes up at some point, like after a year (this deal doesn’t do that, but I’ve seen a lot of folks confusing the two). Also, a lot of folks didn’t realize that Adobe added Lightroom to to the CC offering a while ago, but you can still buy it outright if you want to own it for $149. But then when Lightroom 6 comes out, it’ll cost ya another $79 to upgrade. You’d be better off to take Adobe up on this $9.99 deal.

(4) Adobe heard you
Adobe’s own Photoshop Senior Product Manager Bryan Hughes did a great job of explaining how Adobe is listening to its customers at the closing ceremony at Photoshop World. They are totally tuned-in to what’s happening with their 5-million+ Facebook followers; what’s being said in the Adobe forums, out in the field one-on-one and in blogs and social media throughout the industry. What you’re seeing here is Adobe doing something really meaningful, really significant, and really affordable for photographers. $10 a month. Two cups of coffee to use software programs designed for professionals. That’s incredibly fair.

(5) But Adobe isn’t going back
I know no matter what Adobe does, no matter how good an offer, there will still be some people who are going to post angry comments here, yet again, about how they don’t like the subscription model and that they’re not buying into it and so on. I have news for you. Adobe is NOT going back to selling Photoshop as a stand-alone product.

These folks think if they keep relentlessly complaining that Adobe will change their mind and go back to the old plan. I can tell you this — that is simply not going to happen. They also think everybody is mad about this subscription plan. That’s because they’re not actually reading business news about Adobe. They’re basing this on what they’re reading, and posting, at the same sites where other angry users hang out — and not on what what’s actually happening business wise at Adobe, or they would know that a year ago Adobe’s stock was in the low $30s. Today they’re near their yearly high and approaching $50 a share.

Back in June Adobe announced they had over 720,000 paid CC subscribers. This month when they announce their quarterly earnings where do you think those numbers will be now? I wouldn’t be surprised to see them at nearly a million paid subscribers. That’s an insane number.

Adobe’s Creative Cloud business plan is working big time for Adobe and for nearly a million of their customers, and now they have a killer deal for photographers (the one group that had been left behind). This is Adobe’s business plan going forward, and they’re not looking back.

The deal we’ve been waiting for…
Photographers have been waiting a while for a CC deal that makes dollars and sense and now it’s finally here. You jump up to Photoshop CC (so you get all the new Upright Lens features, and the ability to apply Camera Raw as a filter [my personal favorite], and the Shake Reduction filter and more, plus whatever else Adobe dreams up as soon as its ready — not 18 months from now). Plus you get Lightroom 5 and whatever’s next for it, automatically, all for $10 a month. A ton of photographers will take advantage of this,  and I can’t wait for the opportunity to teach them all the cool new stuff in CC.

Then there are “the other guys.” To them, the only thing Adobe could do to make them happy is go back to the old way, which isn’t going to happen for the reasons outlined here, and for other reasons we have yet to discuss (but we’ll be talking about on “The Grid” this Wednesday at 4:00 pm).

So that’s my take on it
Adobe just invited the rest of us (photographers using some previous version of Photoshop) to the party with an incredibly fair deal. A better deal than I ever dreamed they’d offer. 33¢ a day. Amazing! They also showed the roadmap of  products and services they’re developing for photographers, and we’ll have access to in the coming months. Sadly, a few folks will still keep posting angry comments and complaining on and on (and I’m certain we’ll hear from them here today), but with this deal, a lot of new folks will now join CC to take their place. I hope you choose the other route and start using the coolest software Adobe’s ever made, and at the best price in their history. It’s a day to celebrate, and I’m doing just that.

Cheers everybody, and here’s wishing you your best Monday yet! :)

Anytime Adobe takes the keynote stage at the Photoshop World Conference & Expo, it’s always full of surprises, fun, inspirational moments and usually they give the folks in the crowd a sneak peek at upcoming Photoshop technology, and we’re expecting today’s keynote to packed with all that and more!

You can watch the entire Photoshop World keynote stream LIVE as it happens from the Mandalay Bay Convention Center right on the Vegas Strip. Here’s the link to experience it for yourself.

See you on stage today at 9:00 am Vegas time (12:00 noon East Coast time) and you can probably figure out the rest of the time zones in between. :)

UPDATE: I just got word that Adobe will be making an important announcement for photographers during their keynote this morning (no, it’s not a new version of Lightroom or Photoshop), so if you’re a photographer out there, you are definitely going to want to hear this news first-hand, live as it streams. See you then!

OK, Vegas — it’s here: Photoshop World kicks off today with the pre-conference workshops; the parties start tonight, Photo Walks, and tomorrow we’re live-streaming Adobe’s keynote. Here’s a real quick look at what’s happening:

1. If this is your first time to Photoshop World, make sure you:

(a) Watch the series of short videos we did for you to help you get the most out of the event. They’re called “Insight” and if you go to this page, and scroll down a little bit, you’ll see a bunch of them. They’re only a minute or so a piece but you’ll learn a lot. I posted one above, about the House of Blues party Wednesday night.

(b) Make sure you attend Larry Becker’s first-timers orientation meeting today. You will learn a ton! He teaches it twice today, once at 3:15 pm and again at 5:15. It’s free and open to any attendee (even if it’s not your first time). It’s held in the Tradewinds Ballrooms C-D in the Mandalay Bay Convention Center.

2. Don’t miss the “Meet Up” tonight at 9:00 pm
It’s at the EyeCandy Bar inside the Casino of the Mandalay Bay hotel. It’s just a fun, casual hangout with the instructors, staff and NAPP crew and everyone’s invited (see the 45-second video above). There may be liquor and gambling very nearby. I’m just sayin.’

3. If you’re attending a Pre-Conference workshop…
you can register for the full conference today to save time (instead of waiting in line tomorrow), starting at 10:00 am. This is just for folks attending Pre-Cons. The workshops mostly kick off at 12:00 pm or 1:00 pm depending on which one you’re attending.

4. Go download the free App right now
We have a really handy App (for IOS and Android)  that has details on pretty much everything. It’s free, better than ever, and you’ll totally dig it. Here’s the link. 

5. There’s a SmugMug Photo Walk Tonight and you’re invited
Joining SmugMug’s Google+ Community Manager Michael Bonocore and the+PhotographersAdventureClub on a fun photowalk down the famous Las Vegas Strip, starting at 6:00 PM sharp on the sidewalk in front of the New York, New York hotel. Then you’ll hit the streets to take photos and talk photography. They’re wrapping up the Photo Walk at 8:00PM and then heading to dinner (location T.B.D.).

6. Wednesday’s Adobe Keynote is being streamed LIVE
There is usually a big announcement (hint, hint) or a sneak peek of new technology (hint), so you don’t want to miss this, and you can watch it live, free, anywhere in the world. Here’s the link (it starts a few minutes after 9:00 am PT (Noon East Coast time).

7. You can still get a Free Expo-Only Pass
If you just want to check out the Expo floor (and visit some vendors, see Adobe’s booth, watch some expo floor classes or live shooting demos, thanks to friends at B&H Photo you can get a free Expo-only pass right here for Thursday or Friday.

There’s no Guest Blog Wednesday tomorrow, as we’ll be sharing Photoshop World photos, the Live Keynote stream links, and other conference fun stuff, so check back here to stay on top of any (ahem) announcements. :)

Cheers everybody and Viva Las Vegas!

-Scott

As I’m writing this, I gotta tell ya — I can’t believe it myself, but Adobe is giving everyone who attends the upcoming Photoshop World Conference & Expo  (Sept 4-6, 2013) in Vegas, a FULL one year Adobe Creative Cloud membership. I am just floored!

That’s a $600 membership, because you get it all!!! Photoshop CC, Lightroom, InDesign, Illustrator, Premiere Pro, Muse, Dreamweaver, and on and on, and it all comes with your paid full conference registration. Freakin’ yeah, baby!!!! :)

If you’re already registered for Photoshop World, you still get the one year Adobe Creative Cloud membership deal. If you haven’t registered yet (there’s still time — in fact if you register before Aug. 2nd, you get a $100 early bird discount), you get the CC membership free.

So, now, here’s the deal:

(1) You get world-class Photoshop, Lightroom, Creative Cloud and photography training live and in person. Seven full training classes, packed with the stuff you need to learn now.

(2) You come away with 12-months of the full Adobe Creative Cloud with all the latest creative tools (and yes, if you’re already a CC subscriber, they’ll EXTEND your subscription by 12-months)

(3) You get to choose from over 100 classes; there’s an expo floor with all the top companies displaying their latest gear, and the whole thing is just a blast from beginning to end.

You can sign up right now for a full conference pass for $598 (or just $498 if you’re already a NAPP member). Here’s the link. This is you’re best deal….well…ever!

The whole thing is just amazing to me, and I cannot give a big-enough high-five to Adobe for making this amazingly surreal deal to our attendees. Their support of Photoshop World has always meant a lot to us, but this is just….it’s just…I’m blown away. You will be too!

See you in Vegas in September, baby! Whoo Hoo!!!

 

So I’m reading a review of the new features of Photoshop CC over on Mashable.com, and of course it takes all of three seconds for it to turn nasty, where a commenter accuses the reviewer of getting paid by Adobe to write a favorable review, because after all, if it is a favorable review of something he doesn’t like, the reviewer is obviously “on the take.” He wrote:

“#letsbereal — How many free months of Photoshop CC did Adobe offer for writing this…”

Essentially, he’s saying ‘You said something I disagree with, so you must be getting paid.’ If you say anything positive about the Creative Cloud, like this reviewer did, you get attacked (The funny thing was that the reviewer mentioned how he didn’t like the rental model, yet he was still attacked for liking the new Photoshop features and not siding with the angry mob).

I know this all too well.

When Adobe announced their new subscription plan, the day after I wrote a post here simply addressing some of the misconceptions I had been seeing out there. I did a Q&A where I addressed everything from the misconception that you ran these programs inside a Web Browser to the misconception that you have to be connected to the Internet every day to run Photoshop. I was trying to help, since I knew a lot of the answers. Huge mistake.

There are 662 comments on that post. About 656 of them are direct personal attacks on me, many saying, essentially “I said something you disagree with, so I must be getting paid.” The other six were probably spam. I have literally had people emailing me, and coming up to me in person while I’m out on the road with my tour apologizing for the unwarranted public flogging I took. But that’s where we are today. If any one reviews a product of any kind, and you don’t agree with the reviewer for whatever reason, the reviewer must be getting paid because your opinion on this is so obviously correct to everyone, that only a person getting paid by the company could see it any other way than you see it.

Nobody read where I said, flat-out, at this point I wouldn’t recommend the Creative Cloud to photographers. Nobody seemed to acknowledge that I wrote in-depth about having direct discussions with Adobe about my concerns and the concerns of the 70,000 NAPP members I represent. In fact, I wrote “I've given my opinion [to Adobe] to the point that I can't believe they would actually continue to take my calls.” Yet still, I read again and again how my post was “crafted or written by Adobe’s PR dept.” Geesh.

It’s not just Adobe
This isn’t my first public trashing. I’ve had it nearly as bad once before, when I did a post where I said I was going to buy an iPhone. I didn’t review the iPhone. I didn’t tell other people to buy an iPhone. I just said I thought it looked cool and it had the features I wanted, so I was going to get one. I read comment after comment asking how much Apple had paid me to say I wanted an iPhone, because after all anyone that wants a phone different than that they want is obviously being paid off.

It’s Getting Better Now, But….
Well, last week the Creative Cloud products were released to subscribers, and while I was hesitant to even mention it (which is just sad that it’s come to that), I did post on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ that it had been released and I mentioned that my favorite CC feature was the ability to apply Camera Raw as a filter. It’s one I’ve been waiting years for. I’ve begged everyone at Adobe I know, and it’s finally here, and I love it even more than I thought because it’s faster than I thought it would ever be. But I made the mistake of mentioning it. Cue the haters.

For example, I read this comment:

“I’m going to ignore anybody promoting Photoshop CC, Scott – just cannot afford it, so stop teasing us poor people. Will have to be stuck with CS6 for the rest of my life ;-)”

If you have CS3, CS4, CS5 or CS6, a Photoshop CC subscription is $10 per month for the first year. Two cups of coffee. That’s it. If you can’t swing $10 per month, perhaps Photoshop shouldn’t be your biggest concern, but this is just typical of what I’m reading — not just on my posts, but anywhere somebody posts anything positive about the Creative Cloud.

By the way, the old deal was this: Photoshop is $700. Take it or leave it. Now, anyone can subscribe to Photoshop for $20 a month. I think that’s progress (unless you fear the idea of people who don’t “deserve” to use Photoshop will now actually be able to afford it and become your competitors).

The Entitlement Factor
Another thing I read a lot, still, is from people who skip upgrades complaining that Adobe is being unfair to those “loyal customers.” In fact, in that Mashable article, I read an argument from a guy who skips three releases before he upgrades. I’ve got news for you. You’re not an Adobe customer. Let’s test this theory.

Go to Best Buy, ask for the store manager, and complain about how much the new 4K TVs cost and let him know that he’s being unfair to you, his “loyal Best Buy Customer.” Here’s how that might go:

You: My name is Bob Johnson, and I’m one of your customers.

Best Buy Manager:
OK Bob, let me pull up your records here. Hmmmm. I don’t see any purchases in 2013. Did you buy anything from us this year? No? Let’s check 2012. Hmmm. Nothing there either, Bob. How about we check 2011. Gees I’m checking there and I don’t see any purchases from you in 2011 at all. Let’s go back to 2010. Oh, OK, wait….here it is. You bought something from us back in April of 2010.

Me:
Guess what Bob? You were a Best Buy customer. Yup, back in April of 2010. But Best Buy doesn’t consider you a customer any more. Now, I’m sure the Best Buy manager would like to have you back as a customer again in 2013, but buying something back in 2010 doesn’t keep you as a customer entitled to gripe about…well…anything. Customers are people who buy a company’s products on a regular basis. By the way, if you’re still using Photoshop CS5, it came out in April of 2010. Just so you know.

So when I read people whining about how they’re entitled to upgrades and entitled to this and that, I just shake my head in amazement. Maybe I should go to Exxon and complain how I’m somehow entitled to $2.85 a gallon gas because that was the average price of gas back in April of 2010. By the way, that was probably the last time I bought gas at an Exxon station. I wonder if they still consider me their customer?

I know you’re waiting for an Open Letter to Adobe from me
I still get letters each week from outraged people asking why I haven’t risen up to be the “voice of the people” like I did back in November 2011 when I wrote an “Open Letter to Adobe” here on the blog about a policy Adobe had announced (but totally flew under the radar) which had to do with the cut-off date for when users of CS3 and CS4 would be eligible to upgrade to the Creative Cloud. I didn’t know about it until I read it on an Adobe blog, and I called Adobe out on it, asking them to consider giving those users more time, and thankfully Adobe reconsidered their policy and moved the date until the end of the following year. Very fair I thought, but it was your comments that changed Adobe’s mind, not my letter.

So, where’s my letter this time? When I wrote that letter, it was asking for something very simple â” move the cutoff date. This is a totally different situation. This is a multi-billion dollar software company, the 6th largest software company in the world,  re-inventing the way they do business forever. The software industry is changing faster than ever, and the development, engineering, costs, delivery and methodology of how software is created today is in a state of rapid evolution.

This new plan isn’t something Adobe decided on a whim â” this is the biggest change in the history of Adobe, and one that I’m sure has been considered from every possible angle. I’m certain an open letter from me would be accepted as warmly as I would greet Adobe telling me how much I need to charge for my products. There is a line, and me telling Adobe what to charge for their products, is clearly over it. The public is responsible for telling any company what “the right price” is for their products, and the market always determines what that price will be, which is why you see sales, rebates, deals, and price changes on everything from cars to cameras.

You can’t name a concern you have that I didn’t voice to Adobe before their official announcement. I didn’t just write a letter. I sat in front of them, face-to-face, carrying your message forward but there are some things that I just flat-out have no control over, and no right to interfere with, but yet…they are listening.

Look, Adobe is listening
How could they not be? They read every article. They read every forum comment. I’ve forwarded every single email I’ve been sent directly to the executives at Adobe because I want them to hear from the people I represent.

Yet, haters are still waiting for someone, anyone, to mention the Creative Cloud so they can say the same things over and over again that they’ve been saying since the subscription-only plan was announced. Believe me, Adobe’s heard it. They’ve read it. Adobe realizes all the concerns around pricing for photographers and about the whole file access/editing thing if you ever leave Creative Cloud. This subscription-only plan is still new, and like any plan, it can be tweaked, improved, and modified (but it's not going to be reversed), so hopefully now we can take a deep breath and start looking using the new features we've been waiting for.

By the way, posting the same exact thing on every forum you can find and publicly knocking anyone that disagrees with you doesn’t help your cause. It actually makes you seem like a troll or spammer. When you see 300 negative comments but then realize 150 of those are by the same few people making the same point again and again, makes Adobe or anyone else realize “this isn’t as bad as it looks.”

When I did write an Open Letter back in November of 2011, Adobe did respond but it was two months later. Big multi-billion dollar companies are like aircraft carriers — they’re not speed boats — it takes them a while to turn. Give them a chance to digest all the feedback; consider their options, and give them the benefit of the doubt.

Haters — prepare for a shock
One thing that drives me kind of crazy about the haters is that they feel that everyone out there feels exactly the same way they do. They feel like everyone hates this new plan, it’s universally bad for everyone, and Adobe will soon be in huge trouble financially for it. They completely ignore the fact that there were 500,000 Creative Cloud subscribers already in the program before Adobe announced the Subscription-only deal. These are people who felt it was a better deal for them, and for their business, to sign up for the subscription plan than it was to continue the old plan. Well haters, your day is about to get worse, because this news kind of flew under the radar but Adobe just announced that in just a few weeks, more than 221,000 more people jumped on the Creative Cloud subscription plan (That’s 221,000+ in one quarter alone and that was BEFORE the new CC Apps were available for download).

They now have over 721,000 subscribers, and it’s growing at an incredible pace. The fact is, there are a great many people who feel the Creative Cloud subscription plan is perfect for them, for their needs, and there are a ton of new Adobe customers who could never even dream of using Photoshop that are now becoming Photoshop users. That is cool!

I still feel the same
I still feel that the deal isn’t there for photographers yet. But I talk to Adobe all the time, and I know they are considering lots of options and possibilities and I know one day, hopefully sooner than later, I’ll be able to say “Hey, photographers, now it makes sense.” It’s just not yet. No one will ever acknowledge that I wrote that.

But the tide is starting to turn 
A few weeks ago, it was all negative. I just went through the Mashable list of comments (there were plenty), and son-of-a gun the tide is changing. 721,000+ people are already on the Creative Cloud. By the end of the year, it’ll probably be over a million. There are people out there totally digging it, and they’re starting to stand up for it, and let people know what it’s really about and that it can be really great. They’re going to the forums and writing positive things, despite the trolls and haters, even though they will be accused of “Getting paid by Adobe.” Just like I was.

So what am I going to do?
I’m going to move forward with what I’m supposed to be doing — teaching people how to use Photoshop and Lightroom, and by gosh that’s exactly what I’m going to do. I’m tried of arguing about it — I want to get back to using it. I’m going to go back to reporting what’s going on with Photoshop CC; I’m going to talk about the new features, and I’m going help people along their path and I’m going to continue to voice your legitimate concerns to Adobe.

I’m going to ignore the haters, the trolls, and just move on about my business of teaching, evangelizing, and enjoying the coolest software product ever. If you’re coming with me for the ride, I welcome you along with open arms. If this is the end of our journey together, no worries — I understand, and maybe we’ll meet again one day. :-)

Cheers everybody and thanks for letting me get all this off my chest. Now, I just can’t wait for Apple to release that iPhone 5s. ;-)

All my best,

-Scott Kelby

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