Monthly Archives September 2009


I’m not talking about “metallic prints” (which are prints made on Kodak metallic-finish paper) I’m talking about images actually printed on metal (well, Aluminum to be exact). I got two different kinds in the past two weeks, from two different sources, so I’m going to cover them both here.

First, the print I’m holding above, which is from Image Wizards, and it’s one of their “AluminArte” images (which they call, “High Definition Images on Aluminum”).

On their site (link) they make a pretty bold statement:

“Remember the first time you saw HDTV? Our AluminArte samples will show you a level of imaging never seen before.”

I have to admit—it’s actually right on the money. My buddy Matt Kloskowski had the first AluminArte print I’d ever seen (it was of his amazing landscape shot of a barn in Washington State’s Polouse region), and when it came in the office, we all just stood around it slack-jawed. I’d never seen anything like it. Then when mine print came in (shown above), we all did the same thing—the depth and detail is like what you see on HDTV (compared to regular broadcast).

The sad thing is—-in a regular photo of it (like you see above—photo by Brad Moore), you lose all that depth and dimension that you see so clearly in person (just imagine seeing a HDTV image on a regular TV with no HD and you know what I mean). I found a video on their site, about the process, but again, because it’s video, it can’t show the depth of this type of printing on any level (this is just one of those “you have to see it with your own eyes” type of things).

Anyway, I’m incredibly impressed, and I’m going to have some of my favorite images reprinted as AluminArte images when I get back from Photoshop World. Here’s the link to their site.

Now, onto the 2nd type of metallic printed image:


This one is actually a six-piece mural (made up of six 12″x12″ metallic tiles) from Metal Murals and although theirs isn’t the Hi-Def type of images that I got from Image Wizards, the impact here comes from the size and presentation.

The funny thing is; these two types of images had a different impact on different groups of people. The photographers in my office lost their minds over the quality of the Hi-Def  image (shown above), but everybody (the non-serious photo crowd) were all taken in by the mural. Everybody was talking about it when it came in (and a bunch of golfers in the office wanted to snag it for their office).

The pole they’re connected to (shown here, with the help of Brad Moore—photo by Matt Kloskowski), are also how you mount them to your wall (it came with the mounts, and it’s pretty darn clever how the whole thing works).

Also, you can buy a much smaller 12″x12″ sample version (the size of just one tile) if you want to make a proof for your client before creating the final full-sized mural. Since the mural will have gaps, I think this is really a smart idea—especially if you’re creating a really large mural (these murals can be any size, and not just made up of 12″x12″ squares, and you can have more than just six squares).

They’ve got a page of samples on their site (link) and from their sample page, these must be very popular for tradeshow displays (or it just includes a lot of photos from their own tradeshow booth—I couldn’t tell). Here’s the link to Metal Murals Website.

Anyway, despite the fact that the ‘metallic-ness’ of both types of printing get totally lost when you show a regular photo of them (like you see here), when you see them in person—-either one—-you’ll be amazed at how much impact they have.

I certainly don’t think so (I’d rather see airlines regulated as to how they treat their passengers), but according to an article in Yahoo’s Shine magazine, a governing body in the UK thinks things have gotten so out-of-hand that maybe photo retouching should be regulated.

Here’s what the Shine article said:

“In what’s poised to be the biggest uproar yet over the ongoing issue of Photoshopping in mass media, members of the British Parliament are calling for a ban on digitally altering ads aimed at children under 16, and disclosure of these modifications in ads aimed at adults, reports Jezebel.

Here’s the link to their article to read more.

At the end of each Photoshop World Conference, we do a thing called “The Best of Photoshop World” where we look back at the week through video segments, and get special live presentations from some of the key instructors, and it’s really a fun and relaxing way to wrap up a wild week (and then we give away tons of prizes).

Anyway, my video crew took some of those video clips from our “Best of Photoshop World” presentation from our last Orlando, Florida event, and put them together into one short clip, and it really gives you a great feel for what Photoshop World is really like. Hope you like it.


First, a big thanks to Wes Maggio from Wacom for his great guest post yesterday. You can see from the comments, a lot of people totally dug his post (and it got people thinking big time about using their tablet in ways they hadn’t really considered).

I’m pretty careful anytime I ask someone to be a guest blogger that’s going to be talking about their company’s product, because I don’t want them to turn the Guest Blog into a sales piece, but I know Wes personally and was certain Wes would provide some real helpful info in his post and that’s exactly what he did. Thanks Wes. I picked up some stuff I didn’t know, too. Now, onto the news:

Have You Heard of a Program Like This?
I got a call yesterday from my buddy Paul Abell, and he was asking me if I knew of a program or utility that was designed to track all the models and serial numbers of your camera gear (mostly for insurance purposes). He seemed to remember reading about one, but can’t remember where he saw it (it was a while back). I thought it was a handy idea (in fact, I’d use it myself), but anyway, if any of you know of all application like this, can you please let us both know by posting a comment here on the blog? Many thanks.

Peachpit Press, David DuChemin, and Chris Orwig
Are Up to Something Really Cool

These three have come together to host a very cool contest for anyone attending Photoshop World. The scoop is basically this: you take some cool photos of neon signs in your neck of the woods, and if David and Chris pick your shot as one of their 20 winners, you’ll be invited to a special private Photo Walk at the famous Neon Sign Boneyard Museum near downtown Las Vegas, hosted by Peachpit and a number of Peachpit authors and instructors (includes transfer from the Mandalay Bay resort). The contest is called “Neon in Your Neighborhood” and you can get the whole scoop right here.

Adobe releases free update to Camera Raw & Lightroom
Tuesday Adobe released a Camera Raw (version 5.5)  and Lightroom update (version 2.5) that add support for new cameras (like the new Nikon D300s, and the D3000), among other little fixes. Click here for more details from Lightroom Product Manager Tom Hogarty’s Lightroom Journal blog.

Chase Continues to Amaze
I don’t know if you’ve seen what Chase Jarvis has been doing out in New Zealand for his client San Disk, but if you’ve got a minute, it’s definitely worth checking out. I’m constantly amazed at the stuff he comes up with! Here’s the link.

That’s it for this Thursday
I’m pretty much focused on getting ready for Photoshop World in a few weeks, so I’m keeping the blogging kinda light (which is probably a good thing), but we’ll have LOADS of blogging going on during Photoshop World itself (more on that soon). Have a great day!

Lightroom, Photoshop, and a Tablet = Boom Boom POW!

First off, a big thanks goes out to Scott for letting me submit a little something for Guest Blog Wednesday. It is a pleasure to be included in what I think should be renamed Tough-Act-to-Follow Wednesdays. ;)

© 2008 Randy Carter. All rights reserved.

With the increasing popularity of Lightroom, I want to take this opportunity to address a question that I’ve been asked quite a bit over this past year. “Where does a pen tablet fit in a Lightroom-heavy workflow”?

Ok, truth-be-told, that question isn’t always asked of me so eloquently. It usually comes in the form of something like, this: “Are you concerned that Lightroom has taken such a dominant role in the photographic workflow—that it’s led people away from Photoshop, and thus the need for a tablet.” And along the same lines, but more blunt, “Are you worried that people spend more time in Lightroom than in Photoshop”? And finally, in less of a question and more of a statement, “I don’t need a tablet. Most of my retouching is done in Lightroom”.

Before I share my response, (more…)