Monthly Archives February 2020

Getting Your Portfolio Online Using Adobe Portfolio with Scott Kelby

Take advantage of the online portfolio option that is included in all Creative Cloud subscriptions, and showcase your work! Join Scott Kelby to learn how to use the latest templates and features found inside of Adobe Portfolio.

In this class you’ll learn how to get started with Portfolio, how to build a single gallery, how to add multiple galleries, how to add a contact page, how to add an about the artist page, and how to customize the most important settings to make your portfolio reflect your personal style and taste. You’ll be amazed at how easy it is to use once you learn the basics.

In Case You Missed It… Building Your Portfolio: Editing & Sequencing Your Work

Become a better photographer through editing and sequencing! Join Stella Kramer, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photo editor, as she teaches you how good editing and sequencing can help to do a better job of telling a story with your work.

You’ll learn the basics of editing and sequencing, the importance of knowing your objective, how to deal with critique, why you should stand behind your work, and the value in letting go. Stella brings all of these points home in a series of live edit and sequencing work sessions with three different photographic projects.

Three Misconceptions That May Be Hurting Your Business

I’ve been a professional photographer since 1999, and most of that time, I worked exclusively with natural light.

I told myself (and others) that I preferred natural light. It’s soft, beautiful and, well, FREE! But the truth is, I used natural light exclusively because I didn’t know how to create soft beautiful light with artificial light. And the thought of learning it scared me to death.

I had a lot of misconceptions about strobes and flash. And believing in those misconceptions did more than just keep me from learning to create my own light. Those beliefs hurt my business.

Let me explain.

To have a strong photography business you must have a solid photography brand. And to have a solid brand, your work needs consistency. Your clients expect and deserve to get the look and quality of the images you share in your portfolio and on Instragram. That means that you need to be able to produce the same quality photos every time someone stands in front of your camera.  

When I worked exclusively with natural light I could create beautiful, award winning images, on bright and sunny days. But when the weather turned and that light went away, I couldn’t. Clients who came to me on sunny days got very different photos than clients who came to me on days that were dark. And as someone who lives and works in Seattle, WA, that was a problem. 

Winter months were filled with cancellations, re-shoots a ton of stress, and yes, unhappy clients from time to time.  

I’m sharing this because I know I’m not alone. Many photographers rely exclusively on natural light for the same reasons I did. They have misconceptions about strobes and flash. And those misconceptions keep them from learning a skill that alleviates a lot of problems and stress!

If this sounds like you, it’s okay, you’re not alone.  

Let’s look at what some of the most common misconceptions about strobes and flash are and liberate you from those ideas!

Misconception #1: Artificial Lighting Is Hard

It’s not.

In fact, you already know most of what you need to know to get started.

Why?

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Hi all! Dave Williams here on #TravelTuesday with a little insight for you, as usual. This week, I’ll take a little dive into stock photography.

There have been lots of reports lately, which is of no exception as these reports frequently come up, stating that photographers make very little from stock photography. Headlines quoting earnings as low as $0.01 are usually what hooks the readers in. But, is there actually money in it for us?

The simple answer is: yes. But, obviously, if we shoot and sell through an agency, such as Adobe Stock, Getty Images, Shutterstock etc., we give them their share. Or rather, they take their share!

A wreckage of a DC3 Dakota Skytrain of the US Navy, crashed on 24th November 1973 at Solheimasandur black sand beach in Iceland when it ran out of fuel, lying peacefully on the ice

The key to selling is to be found. I explain fully how to keyword an image in one of my KelbyOne classes, but doing this right and writing an appropriate caption will boost your sales and get you off to a good start.

When thinking about how much money we’ll make in stock photography, it’s important also to consider that once a photo is out there, it’s earning. It could be earning one $1,000 sale or 100 $10 sales, but in either case, it’s putting cash in our wallets.

What about all the negative press surrounding stock photography? The L.A. Times, for instance, reported this week that one photographer has sued Getty Images to the tune of $1,000,000,000.00 having been charged for use of her own photo, to which she, of course, retains copyright. The headline isn’t entirely accurate, as always, but the story remains similar. This is an extreme case, but not one that should perturb someone wishing to make some cash from their photography.

Let’s put it this way: –

If you’ve taken a photo and it has no exclusive usage rights attached, from a commissioned shoot for example, then why not get it on stock earning some money? Whatever amount it makes is more money than you had before you put it up there.

To make a living from stock photography, there’s a different approach. A library of thousands of relevant images needs to be available, which means scouring trending topics and working out what the market is missing, then going out and shooting to fill that gap. Daily! But, should all these bad press examples that float around the internet be putting us off? Really? No, I don’t think they should.

What are your thoughts? Do you shoot stock? Would you like to, but there’s maybe something holding you back?

Whatever the reason, it’s worth a dive into the deep end to see the reality for yourself. Go sign up with an agency and see what residual income your photos can generate for you!

Much love

Dave

Start your week off right by doing something really important. Go Back Up Your Photos, right now.

I get an email or Facebook message on a regular basis with another heartbreaking story from a photographer who didn’t have a back-up of their photos, and they lost every photo they had taken in the last few years, including photos of their family — everything — gone forever.

Stop whatever you’re doing and right this very minute, and take a few minutes to protect the visual history of your life, and back up your images. Just drag them from your computer onto an external hard drive. It takes so much less effort than you’d think.

If you don’t have one: here’s a link to one of the portable drives I use —  it’s a WD 4-terabyte portable USB 3.0 drive for just $89 at B&H Photo. $89! That is incredibly inexpensive, (and it works like a champ).

My Backup and Lightroom Organization Strategy

If you’re a KelbyOne Pro, I have an entire course on backing up and organizing your images on your back-up drive and then in Lightroom. It’s called my 2019 “Simplified Lightroom Image Management System” (or SLIM System for short) and folks have told me so many times how helpful it has been to them and you might find it helpful, too — here’s the link.

Anyway, this is just your friendly reminder that this is, officially, “Back Up Your Photos Monday.” :)

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Houston & LA – I’m Headed Your Way!

The next stops for my full-day “Ultimate Photography Crash Course” seminar are Houston on Monday, March 23, and then Los Angeles on Wednesday, March 25th. Hope you can come out and join me for the day. Tickets and info right here.

Have a good one!

Scott

I want one!

I don’t even know all the specs yet, but between the features that Canon has announced, and the ones that reliable sources have leaked, I’m thinking it’s time for a new body! (Note: Don’t tell my wife. This is just between us. It’s a secret. Etc.).

Now, I don’t know what it costs (if Canon said how much they’re charging, I missed it), so there’s still a big question mark out there, but I’m hoping it’s priced right (so, basically not in the 1Dx III price range).

You had me at two card slots!

Not really (gotcha!). Seriously not a big deal to me whatsoever (I thought all the hand-wringing about the EOS R not having two slots was really overblown), so if it has two slots. great. I’ll probably leave one empty, and I don’t even know what type of cards it supports yet anyway). And the 8K video? I don’t shoot video, so it doesn’t help me one way or the other, but it seems a lot of people are really psyched about that.

What I do like is the very fast frames-per-second rate; the higher megapixels; the good possibility of a sensor with improved dynamic range, the IBIS (In Body Image Stabilization), and there are still more features yet to be announced. OK, I’m in. Ya know, in theory — still doesn’t know what it costs.

Shout to out San Diego and Phoenix

Great turnouts in both cities (thank you guys), with almost 550 photographers coming out for the two days. I met a ton of great folks; really had a lot of fun, had a great dinner with a buddy in San Diego’s Little Italy section, and got to see some more friends in Phoenix. Thanks to everybody that came out spend the day with me. Next stops: Houston then Los Angeles next month. I am having so much fun on this tour — I can’t wait!

Well, that’s it from here in the Delta Sky Club at Phoenix Airport’s Terminal #3. Got a red-eye home tonight at 11:25 am. Zzzzzzzz!

Have a happy Valentine’s Day (don’t forget your sweetie), and a great weekend. :)

-Scott

The Art of Zootography with Steven Gotz

The zoo is a wonderful place to begin or renew your love of photography! Join Steven Gotz at the Oakland Zoo as he takes you through all of the photographic opportunities that can be found at your local zoo. From shooting megafauna like lions and bears to microfauna like reptiles and insects, there’s always something to photograph at a zoo.

In this class you’ll learn about the gear and camera settings you can use, how to shoot through fencing and glass, how to use small flash in surprising ways, how to shoot animals in natural looking habitats, the importance of doing your research before you go, and so much more. As Steven takes you through the zoo he shares many tips and tricks to help you get the most out of your zoo experience.

In Case You Missed It: Moose Peterson’s African Safari Adventure

Moose goes on safari! With a career studying and photographing wildlife for over three decades, Moose has his first African safari and you’ve got a front row seat. Join Moose as he encounters the wide array of wildlife that calls the Mala Mala Game Reserve in South Africa home. Moose shares his take on the gear he brought along with his tips and techniques for capturing images that help tell the story of your trip.

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