Tag Archives Photoshop tricks

Hello, internets! It’s #TravelTuesday again, so I’m here to impart some kind of wisdom onto you, and today it’s all about tweaking colour with Camera Raw’s Hue sliders. But first!

I’m writing this post from a Starbucks just outside of the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park in Scotland, fresh from an overnight stop before I head farther north towards the Isle of Skye. I’m shooting a couple of little projects involving drone photography and Platypod tripods. You can keep up with what I’m doing on this trip by following me on social media (look for @capturewithdave) and by watching the @kelbyonepics Instagram story!

On with the blog!

The HSL  (Hue/Saturation/Luminance) Adjustments panel in Adobe Camera Raw is very useful, but perhaps most confusing are the Hue options. While the Saturation and Luminance sliders enhance the colours, the Hue sliders actually change them. There are some pretty powerful things you can do with the Hue sliders—you can even change the seasons in post if you tweak the colours the right way.

What’s actually happening when you adjust a colour slider in the Hue tab is that you’re moving its position on a colour wheel. In terms of its practical application, I’ll use the Hue sliders to adjust this photo and make the grass greener, whilst maintaining the other colours.

 

 

In this shot, the tones up in the sky are beautiful—the sun lowering in the sky (it’s 9pm) is casting a fabulous orange glow—but I feel like the grass should be just a little bit greener. We can take advantage of the Hue sliders and make this adjustment easily right in Camera Raw.

 

 

Using the Hue sliders to shift the colours within sections of the colour wheel, if we move the Yellows slider (the colour of the grass in this case) towards the green end, and compensate with the Oranges and Greens sliders to maintain the actual green and retain that orange in the sky by moving those sliders away from the yellow ends, we’ve easily achieved our goal! It’s as easy as that!

 

 

 

That grass is now greener, which to me is more realistic and more pleasing, and all it took was an understanding of what’s going on with the Hue tab’s sliders.

Much love

Dave

Hey hey! Welcome to #TravelTuesday, right here on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider. I’m Dave Williams, I’m here every Tuesday, and today I’m coming at you with a quick-fire Photoshop tip on how to sharpen without hitting that Sharpen button!

This technique works across the board, from landscapes to portraits, and can be used to make your images more visually impactive. It’s a clever little technique, which improves contrast across the entire range of tones, particularly within the smaller detailed elements (such as hair in a portrait or plants in a landscape), and it enhances the textures and, of course, the sharpness of the picture.

The reason this technique should be considered in many cases, rather than the Sharpen filter, is because the Sharpen algorithm samples pixels and looks for what it considers an edge, and then it applies some contrast to those edge pixels. This technique uses a different method of contrast-specific blend modes to quickly and easily enhance detail in your shot by using the actual edges, rather than guessing what’s an edge. Here’s how it’s done:

Open your image and duplicate the layer with CMD + J (Windows: CTRL + J).

Next, apply the High Pass filter (found under the Filter menu, under Other) by selecting a Radius value that gives you a clear contour on edge elements in your shot—usually between 1 and 6 px.

Now, we need to set the blend mode to Overlay using the pop-up menu near the top left of the Layers panel.

That’s it! I told you it was easy! The differences between using the Sharpen filter and using this technique give you, in most cases, a fantastic result, bringing your image to life!

Much love

Dave

Hello hello hello! Here I am again, right here on Scott Kelby’s Photoshop Insider, I’m Dave Williams and you’ll find me here every Tuesday – you lucky, lucky people!

This week I’m coming at you hard and fast with a top tip on improving what may otherwise be a ‘bog standard’ sunset shot that uses just one simple process, one layer, and three adjustments. Let’s go!

First off, load up your sunset shot into Adobe Photoshop. I’ve gone for a ‘bog standard’ one that I shot a couple of years ago in London’s Docklands.

Next up, on the Adjustments Panel on the right select the Channel Mixer.

In there you’ll notice that the Layers Panel takes care of itself and you are able to adjust the Red, Green and Blue Channels.

One tip at this point for any future use of this tool is that ideally your Total should add up to 100% with whatever setting you make in order to maintain a balanced colour.

In this panel to give our sunset some oomph we can change the Red to 200%, the Green to -50%, and the Blue to -50%.

That’s it. Literally that is it. The red tones have had a punch and the overall sunsetty feel (definitely the correct professional term) is enhanced enough to have made a positive impact but not so much that it has become unrealistic.

There are of course plenty of other things we can do to make this image more presentable, and now we’ve got the tones right we can get to work on it.

I hope you found the useful, it’s a very quick and easy tip with a great impactive affect! Here’s a side by side for comparison: –

As always, feel free to aim your questions my way and show me how you get on!

Much love

Dave

I saw this Photoshop down & dirty technique in a print ad for the Samsung Galaxy S4 and thought I’d break it down for you, here.

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STEP ONE: Open your background image (in the Samsung Ad I saw, it had a child holding a bunch of balloons, kinda like what you see here (I downloaded this stock photo from dollarphotoclub.com).

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STEP TWO: Open an image of a cell phone (here’s a stock cell phone photo, also from dollarphotoclub). Put a selection around the cell phone (as seen here), and then Copy just the phone into memory (I used the Magic Wand tool to click on the white background, then I pressed Shift-Command-I (PC: Shift-Ctrl-I) to invert the selection (The opposite of the white background is, of course, the phone. It’s an old trick).

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STEP THREE: Now Paste the cell phone image (that you copied into memory in the previous step) onto the balloon photo and position it over the balloons, as seen here.

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STEP FOUR: Now we’re going to remove the center of the phone (where the screen would be). Get the Polygonal Lasso Tool from the toolbar. Click it in the bottom left corner, then move your cursor up to the top corner and it draws a straight line between the tool. Now make your way around the rectangular screen area clicking once in each corner, and then finish the selection by clicking back where you started once you’ve gone all the way around the screen (as seen here).

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STEP FIVE: Once your selection is in place, just hit the Delete key (PC: Backspace key) to knock a hole out where the screen was previously (as seen here).

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STEP SIX: Now click the Layer Mask button at the bottom of the Layers panel (it’s the third button from the left) to add a Layer Mask to this layer. Now get the Brush tool; choose a small hard-edged brush from the Brush Picker up in the Options bar. Set Black as your Foreground color and paint right over the bar on the right side of the photos anywhere it touches the balloons, as seen here (see my brush cursor on the red balloon?). As you paint, it masks away (hides) that part of the phone, making it appear like the balloons are coming out of the phone.

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STEP SEVEN: Lastly, add some type to finishing things off (I tweaked the Samsung headline a bit, and added the KelbyOne.com logo at the bottom right because…well…it’s our logo (and I had it on my laptop).

So, that’s it. A quick and easy masking job – hope you found it helpful (and I hope it showed how easy some of the effects are that we see around us every day).

Have a great Tuesday everybody!

-Scott

P.S. We’re kicking off a brand new Lightroom CC tour with our own RC Concepcion visiting cities all over the USA, starting in Charlotte, NC in just 8-days from now. Here’s where to go for more details. 

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