Category Archives Photography

Hi gang: This weekend I got a chance to take two Canon 7D Mark IIs out for a real world field-test shooting two football games: On Saturday the Tennessee Vols vs. the Florida Gators, and on Sunday the New York Giants vs. the Atlanta Falcons at Met Life stadium in New Jersey. (Note: the two camera bodies I used were overnight loaners from Canon of pre-production demo units â” they are not the final shipping cameras â” so they’re not quite finished yet, but they’re far enough along that I could at least test them and give you, and Canon, feedback).

I’m posting some high resolution samples here (below), but make sure you watch the video above because we tackled all the important stuff you’d want to know about (of course, we talked a lot about high-ISO performance), plus we took loads of questions during the broadcast (I’m joined by RC Concepcion and Brad Moore in the studio). It’s really kind of “three guys sitting around talking about a camera” type of show and I show lots of my photos (not just sports stuff) taken with the 7D Mark II.

Above: Specs: Shot as JPEG image. 640 ISO. 1/1000 of a second at f/5.6. 560mm (400mm with a 1.4 tele-extender). If you click on this low-res preview, it will take you to the full high-resolution image you can download. I cropped-in a tiny bit to fix composition and I brightened the image 1/2 stop, but it’s still a bit under-exposed [I was shooting JPEG and used Exposure Compensation to overcome some highlight clipping I wouldn’t have even worried about if I had been shooting in Raw]. No sharpening, noise reduction, vibrance or any of that type of stuff in post. By the way, it’s killing me to post a non-sharpened image. Just sayin’.

We Covered a Ton!
We covered what worked, what I wish were different, and literally just minutes before we started taping a tech-rep at Canon called in and helped out by showing how to fix my #1 complaint about the camera for shooting sports (which we show how to address during the show above). I still had to whine about a few things (I hope Canon is listening), but I covered the stuff it did right as well. We really tried to cover all the questions we’d been hearing on social and here on the blog as best we could.

Above: Shot in JPEG mode (we explain why on the video). This one’s at 1,000 ISO at 1/1250 of a second. Same lens as above. Cropped in a bit. We also show a large print of this on the show. 

RC Totally Scores!
My favorite part of the broadcast comes around the 2/3 to 3/4 mark when RC absolutely nails why this camera is so important, and he really articulated what I’ve been trying to say about the 7D Mark II since the official announce. You’ll know when it happens because I literally high-fived him for stating it in a way I wish I had, because he really put it all on context.

Above: I used Auto ISO to shoot in the locker room before game time. That image you see above? That’s 16,000 ISO. Click on it to get the high-res version (no noise reduction in post â” and that was shot in JPEG mode). It’s shot at f/2.8 at 1/1000 of a second using a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens. You definitely do see noise on the full res image (heck, you see noise on a 1Dx at 16,000 ISO), but I was still pretty amazed that a crop-sensor camera could get this kind of performance at 16,000 ISO. 

I’ll be around today to try and answer any questions we didn’t cover during the broadcast (if you’re going to ask about noise, please watch the video ’cause we covered it to death), so just leave me a comment here and I’ll do my best (Note: I just did a field test â” not an in-depth lab report, so if you ask me pixel-peeper style in-depth techie stuff I’m probably not the right guy to answer those, but I might be able to find someone at Canon who can answer those types of questions).

Above: I thought I should at least post one image actually taken at 100 ISO, so here ya go. This is uncropped, un-anything; shot in JPEG mode. Again, click on it to see the high-res version. 

Anyway, hope this helps, and here’s wishing you your best Tuesday yet!



P.S. We’re only four days away from my 7th Annual Worldwide Photo Walk. If you haven’t registered to join the local walk in your city this Saturday, it’s not too late. Here’s the link.

Hi Gang: Mia McCormick sits down with one of my all-time heroes of sports photography, the legend himself, Peter Read Miller for his impressions of the recently announced Canon 7D Mark II. If you got a sec, it’s definitely worth checking out.

Also, I shot two games this weekend using the 7D Mark II for my main and secondary bodies (weekend loaners from Canon — just early demo units — not the final shipping version), and I cannot wait to share some shots with you here tomorrow from the Vols/Gators and Falcons/Giants games, so make sure you stop back tomorrow for my field report.

Hope you guys have an fantastic Monday (I know, that’s an oxymoron) even if your team lost this weekend (all my teams lost. Ugh. But there’s still a faint hope for my Fantasy Team â” I’m in third place in our league).



One of the greatest photographers ever made is having his first solo gallery show, opening this week at the Monroe Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico and if you get a chance â” you have to see it in person. Here are the details:

Who: Joe McNally
What: A solo exhibition
Where: The Monroe Gallery: 112 Don Gaspar Ave, Santa Fe, NM (link)
When: October 3rd thru November 23rd
Why:  Because Joe is a photography students will study after we’re all gone.

Here’s a link to the gallery’s site with all the details. Hope you get the chance to see it in person.

I’m off to Orlando for my seminar there tomorrow â” looking forward to meeting a whole bunch of you there.

Have a better than average Tuesday. That’s all I can muster for a Tuesday. ;-)



OK, we’ve had “Backup Tuesday” and now it’s time for “Update Your Portfolio Monday” â” a reminder that it’s time to shake the dust off that portfolio â” see if you have newer, better shots that need to be added. Take a look at the sequence (order) of your images and see if they need changing, see if anything needs to come out, and just make sure everything’s up-to-date.

So far, I’ve only had enough time to update my Sports Photography Portfolio (here’s the link). I actually added a new category for College Football, and updated my NFL port, and made a change or two to my GameDay Detail port, too. Tonight I’m going to update my regular port (hosted by smugmug â” you can use the link at the top right of my blog here).

Hey, if you update your blog today as part of “Update Your Port Monday” leave me a link here, and let me know what you did to update it. If you don’t have an online port, what are ya waitin’ for?

Here’s wishing you an updated kinda Monday!



Hey everyone – RC here. If you have spent any time on this blog or at KelbyOne, you have more often than not come across of Joe McNally.  With over 30 years in the business, he is one of the most sought after photographers out there working today.  He’s shot for Sports Illustrated, Newsweek, LIFE and National Geographic – winning a dizzying amount of awards in over 60 countries.

But the best honor for him yet happens this October 3 – November 23 2014 at the Monroe Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He will have his first solo show!  I figured it would be neat to share why Joe’s one of my photographic idols – and why I cannot wait to make the trek to New Mexico for opening day. (Click on this link for more details on this)

The Tenacity of Being a Photographer

(photo credit - Christopher Morris - VII Agency)

I’ve been a fan of Joe’s work for a long time – long considering him one of my photographic idols. His ability to work with flash has always been second to his tenacity for wanting to get an interesting shot. Here he’s working on a rooftop in Russia photographing a ballerina. Why? Because that’s where the picture was.

I’ve always thought of Joe as one part Ernest Hemingway, one part Hannibal Smith from The A-Team.  When he has an idea – it would seem that there is not much that will get in the way of him getting it. Just yesterday, I saw a location here in St. Lucia (we’re teaching a workshop out here) and thought to myself “Man, this one cave/vine area would be a great location to make a picture. But man, that looks like a bit of a climb. I wonder how dangerous that climb is….”

Telling Joe about the location? “Yeah, I made this picture up there a couple of years ago when I was…”

The next time I get there, you’ll be sure that I won’t hesitate climbing to that location to make a shot. Because that’s where the picture is.

The Storyteller in the Photographer

The quest to tell a story has brought him around the world. This is a picture of a girl in Mumbai in 1999.

This picture was a part of a series he did called “The Panorama of War.” That series won him the Alfred Eisenstaedt Award for Journalistic Impact. Eisenstadt. A giant in the photographic world.

I often look back at my own work and think about how much excess I throw into a picture to try to make a point. To try to help the caption that I have under the picture. I want the effects that I place in the file to help move the reader to the conclusion I want them to see.

I’ll often look back at pictures like this and get inspired to find a story. Forget about the effects and the software. Just walk around and find one picture that doesn’t need a single caption. I’m completely OK with the fact that I am not there yet. This isn’t a race. I just want to make sure that I am on the right track. In this – I see Joe as a beacon.

The Dreamer in the Photographer

Imagine going into a shoot with Michelle Pfeifer. Most people would be freaking out about having to make a picture with an actress of that stature.

Joe’s response? Oh lets make a custom jewelry case, and make a picture with the Hope Diamond.

As a photographer you don’t really need an actress or the Hope Diamond. But – how many pictures have you had in your own head that you’ve never really given yourself permission to create?  How many ideas stay stuck in your head – a victim of “Oh that will never work.”  I think that one of the biggest challenges that one can have as a photographer is to know that sometimes you have to shift from capturing whats in front of you to realizing a concept. I am horrible at that. I relegate my creative experience to making something cool of a situation in front of me. I get extremely timid, however, telling people “Oh… I have this idea in my head… Let me tell you what it is.”  In that, I feel like I don’t move myself along. I should. But I don’t. But looking at Joe’s work makes me want to. In that, he’s my inspiration.

The Monroe Gallery

When it comes to historically important pictures in Photojournalism – you cannot beat The Monroe Gallery in Santa Fe. The gallery features the work of photographers like Alfred Eisenstadt, Margaret Bourke White, Carl Mydans, Arnold Newman, Neil Leifer and many others.

Walking into this place feels like you’re walking into a hallowed hall.  As a photographer, I think it’s so important for you to look back into these founts for inspiration and bearing.   To be surrounded by the work of someone we all admire, is a big call for celebration – and we are all so happy for him because of it.

Hopefully I will see you guys there on opening day!!

(Big thanks to Joe for letting me use your pictures)