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  • Category Archives Photoshop

    Yesterday, in my post about my first football shoot of the year (link), I mentioned that if some of the players wind up in the shade, that I remove the blue tint that appears over anything white (like their jerseys, helmet, the stripes on the ball, and so on) in Lightroom (or Camera Raw). Anyway, I had a few questions about it, so I thought I post a quick tutorial. Here goes: Above: Here's a great illustration of the problem: when the team winds up on a part of the field that's covered in shadows (as seen here), their white jerseys (and anything white for that matter) get a deep blue tint over them. However, you can see from the photo, that in a few seconds part of the team will be running in the daylight in front of them, which puts part of the…

    If you're at Photoshop World in Vegas, the book is being officially launched by Peachpit Press there and we have a limited number for sale at the official bookstore on the Expo floor. It's hitting other bookstores next week (Amazon.com already has the Kindle version available now), and you can preorder the print version from Amazon.com, or Barnes & Noble.com, or pick it up at your local bookstore in just a few days.

    So, yesterday we had four very awesome folks from Adobe's Photoshop Team down at our headquarters for a visit for a couple of days, and among them was Senior Product Manager for Photoshop, Bryan O'Neil Hughes (you might recognize Bryan from his demos on stage during past Photoshop World Conference keynote presentations, or from his Guest Blog post here on my blog) Anyway, since Bryan was here, we thought it would be fun to do a special Bonus episode of "The Grid" and have Bryan on live for what we called "Grill the Photoshop Product Manager." Luckily, Bryan was up for, and grill him we did (in fact, I kinda felt bad a couple of times), but Bryan is such a class act, and such a cool cat under pressure, that he sailed through it all, and provided some really great insights and answers.…

    If you ever wanted some one-on-one time with Adobe's Principal Product Manager for Photoshop, well...today's your day. We're doing a special bonus LIVE episode of 'The Grid" today and Bryan is our in-studio guest, taking your questions on the air about....well...anything! Send your questions now (and during the show) via Twitter---just include the hashtag #grillbryan, or you can just post a question here. Hope you'll join us for a history-making live event, today at 4:00 pm EDT, on "The Grid" Here's the link: http://www.kelbytv.com/thegrid

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    At every seminar we do, at the end of the day we ask the participants to fill out an evaluation form, to let us know how we did, but most importantly what we can do to make the day even better. I know those eval forms are a pain in the butt to fill out, but after the seminar I personally read every single one of them. I want to find out what's resonating with the participants, what they want more of, what they want less of, and what I can add or take away that would make the day better. I take this stuff really seriously In fact, there are four things I changed, tweaked and added in Orlando, Cologne, and Amsterdam that came directly from �the eval forms from my seminars in Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver. In fact, I shot a special…

    ...and In Vancouver, Calgary, and Toronto..and last year in London....and two weeks ago in Orlando...is that: photographers and Photoshop users everywhere are struggling with the exact same things. The same issues. The same hurdles. The same things that stump photographers in San Francisco, are stumping photographers in Germany. (Above: Brad took this shot of my seminar in Amsterdam, just hours before his 27th birthday. Happy Birthday Braddo!) So what is it? It's not just one thing---it's lots of things. Here's five common themes: (1) Power They Didn't Know They Had A lot of people don't realize that the things they want to do are actually in Photoshop or already in Lightroom, but since they're kind of "hidden beneath the surface" (maybe it takes a hidden three-key shortcut, or its buried under a menu they never go under), they think they need to buy some…

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